Pri app sci_std_file_y3_s3

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Pri app sci_std_file_y3_s3

  1. 1. 1 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Manushree (Year 3 securelevel 3)Child profileManushree is a thoughtful child and a confident communicator. The work here is at secure level 3, but herprogress has been quite rapid and she is expected to move onwards to level 4 well within a year.The evidence1. Investigating different types of teeth2. Investigating pulse rate3. Investigating opaque materials4. Investigating sound levels5. PlantsQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  2. 2. 2 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Investigating different types of teethAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children had been discussing what makes them healthy. They had a visit from the local dental nursewho discussed how to clean their teeth and used disclosing tablets to demonstrate this. The childrenlabelled diagrams of teeth and explored their different functions by eating biscuits.The children were asked to investigate which types of teeth are best for breaking up food. Each pair wasgiven different tools to represent different kinds of teeth and then asked to break up a banana using them.The children had to decide which teeth were represented by the different tools and to observe and describethe action of each.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  3. 3. 3 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidence© Astra Zeneca Science Teaching TrustQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  4. 4. 4 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesWhen asked what the pair had done, Manushree said: ‘We used the scissors to cut the banana and pretended they were incisors.’ ‘Next we used the plastic tweezers to tear the banana but the tweezers mushed the bananas instead. (They were meant to be canines!)’ ‘Then we used the cubes which were meant to be our molars and they mushed all the banana.’When asked what was good and not good about their activity she said: ‘The thing that was not good about the test was that one of the tools wasn’t doing what it had to do because the tweezer was meant to tear the banana but it mushed it up instead. We could have had a different tool instead of a tweezer – we could have used two forks instead.’ ‘Different teeth are best at different things.’QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  5. 5. 5 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Exploring why models are useful to help describe different scientific ideas. Exploring the materials used in the dental profession, such as fillings and braces, and the reasons for their use.Assessment commentaryManushree and her partner use scissors, tweezers and cubes to model different types of teeth and theiractions, and correctly match the models to the different types. Manushree can identify differences betweenthe action of three different types of teeth and can link their function to their property. She responds toquestions given to her in order to suggest solutions. She uses appropriate scientific vocabulary to explainthe key ideas. She uses the equipment carefully and can make a meaningful assessment of how itperforms. She can also suggest how she could improve the investigation, suggesting an alternative modelto simulate the action of canine teeth.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  6. 6. 6 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Investigating pulse rateAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextChildren had been studying the topic ‘Ourselves’ and in the previous few lessons had been looking at therole of the heart.They were asked to plan an investigation to find out whether pulse rate changes with exercise. The term‘fair testing’ was reviewed. Children share-wrote a method using suggestions from the class.The investigation was then performed in small table groups where their results were compiled into a tableprovided.The children were then asked to construct a bar graph, using pre-drawn axes but working individually withthe data. The children wrote conclusions based on the graph and table of results by continuing a sentencestem: ‘From my results I have learnt…’.The evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  7. 7. 7 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript of main written text:To plan an experiment to test whether exercise affects your heartMethod:1. First rest for 2 minutes.2. Secondly measure your pulse rate for 1 minute.3. Afterwards exercise for 2 minutes.4. Then measure your pulse rate again for 1 minute.5. After, exercise again for 2 minutes.6. Measure your pulse rate once again for 1 minute.7. Next rest again for 2 minutes.8. Once again measure your pulse for 1 minute.Prediction:I think that when I am resting my pulse rate will be slower because my heart can have a rest.I think that when I am doing exercise my pulse rate will be faster because my heart has to work harder.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  8. 8. 8 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  9. 9. 9 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTranscript of conclusionConclusion:From my results I have learnt that when you exercise your pulse rate beats faster because my heart has topump my blood and my oxygen around my body. I have also learnt from my results that when you rest yourheart does not work as hard as it does when you exercise.Some people in my class, 3H, had very funny results because they had not counted their pulse rateproperly, stopped half way through when they were jogging and many more.When I rest my pulse rate is slower because … your heart is not working that hard.(Bold text written by teacher.)QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  10. 10. 10 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Data logging activity on heart rate data when resting, exercising and recovering from exercise to explore how quantitative data can be represented in line graphs. Consideration of evidence obtained and whether it supports a selection of true and false statements, such as: — ‘Everybody’s heart beats faster when they exercise.’ — ‘Heart rate goes back to normal as soon as you stop exercising.’ — ‘Your heart rate slows down as you grow from child to adult.’Assessment commentaryAlthough the formats for the table and bar chart are provided to Manushree, her observations andmeasurements are accurate. She records her pulse rate at regular intervals using a stop clock, and givesreasons for unexpected results. She uses appropriate scientific forms of language when discussing herfindings. She can identify a straightforward pattern in data, and she refers to her knowledge of the heart’sfunction to support this.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  11. 11. 11 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating opaque materialsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children had been learning about sources of light, reflectors, how shadows are formed, and what ismeant by the term opaque.The class received a ‘letter from the Queen’ reporting recent burglaries at Buckingham Palace. The letterexplained to the children how the security guard, Larry, goes to bed during the day to be awake at night, butcannot sleep because his curtains let in the daylight. As a result he keeps falling asleep while at work,preventing him from catching the robbers.The Queen goes on to ask them for their help in investigating a selection of different materials that wouldbe suitable for curtains to improve Larry’s sleep. The children were told that this was a matter of nationalimportance and they would be presenting their results in the form of a television news report.The children were given different samples of materials, analysed them and made some predictions. Theycarried out tests, using torches and a screen. As a secondary activity, some of the children, includingManushree, were asked to comment on the use of multiple layers of material as well as single layers.After further class discussion, the children worked in mixed-ability pairs, using a question and answertemplate to prepare and make the presentations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  12. 12. 12 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  13. 13. 13 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  14. 14. 14 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesManushree mentioned how the depth of colour of the shadow changed in the sample of a material.See the video clip of Manushree and another pupil presenting a news report discussing opaqueand transparent materials. This is available on the National Strategies web area (go towww.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse the primary standards files orsearch for ‘APP science standards file: Manushree’).QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  15. 15. 15 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Comparison of the different uses of opaque and transparent materials, with consideration of other material properties and other factors. Data logging activity to obtain quantitative data for this investigation.Assessment commentaryManushree can respond to the problem of light coming in through the bedroom window and makessuggestions on choice of materials for curtains that will solve the problem. She uses a torch, materials anda light box to represent sunlight, curtains and a bedroom. Manushree presents data in a prepared table andmakes some use of scientific vocabulary. She shows good observational skills, identifying the depth ofcolour in the shadow. She describes which were the most and least opaque materials from the selection,although she identifies C and D rather than either D and F or C, D and F as would be suggested by herrecorded results. She links opacity to their suitability for effective curtains.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  16. 16. 16 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Investigating sound levelsAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextDuring a topic on sound, children explored the sensed properties of different sounds – loudness and pitch.They started by sorting some sounds of different loudness and pitch, and, in pairs, went on to a simpleinvestigation of loudness. They were encouraged to discuss their conclusions before writing them. Duringthese discussions, the teacher demonstrated the use of a data logger for measuring sound levels.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  17. 17. 17 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTranscript of main text:Conclusion:I found out that the bottle with the most amount of rice was the quietest because there wasn’t much roomfor the vibration and so only the top of the rice vibration. The loudest was the one with the least amount ofrice because there was lots of room for the vibration and so all of the rice can vibrate. The bottle with themiddle amount of rice was the second loudest as there wasn’t as much room to vibrate. My results didmatch my predictions. To improve the test we could have used a data logger.We could have used a data logger instead because our ears aren’t accurate and data loggers are.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  18. 18. 18 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Data logging activity to investigate sound levels in different environments around the school. Discussion of the benefits of working in small groups rather than individually.Assessment commentaryManushree identifies a variety of scenarios in which different sounds can be heard, and sorts the soundsaccording to their effects on the senses. She can use a selection of scientific vocabulary, and she makesobservations that are relevant to the volume of sound. In her conclusion, she identifies a cause and effectlink between the vibrations and the volume. She also suggests the use of a data logger to improveassessment of the volume.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  19. 19. 19 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 PlantsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF4ContextThe children visited Kew Gardens and took part in a tour and workshop, learning about plant growth andnurture. Back in school they looked further at the life cycles of plants and kept a diary for the growing ofcress seeds, observing and recording changes taking place as the seeds germinated and grew.They then took part in a themed day during which ‘Charles Darwin’ visited the school. The children weregiven the opportunity to learn about his life and work and how this has changed our understanding ofplants, and to apply their current learning to the real world. Manushree meets Charles DarwinAs an opportunity to apply their knowledge and observe plants in an everyday environment, the childrenwent into the school grounds to compare and record different kinds of plants.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  20. 20. 20 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceSee the video clip of Manushree exploring plant growth in the school environmental area. This isavailable on the National Strategies web area (go towww.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse the primary standards files orsearch for ‘APP science standards file: Manushree’).Teacher’s notesAt Kew, Manushree saw scientific work about pollination and confidently asked about bees and butterfliesand why scientists need to help particular plants in their hothouses.Quotes from Manushree’s cress diary:Manushree recorded on Day 1: ‘The seeds are miniature and are a nice rusty brown. They are shaped a bit like raindrops.’On Day 2 she recorded: ‘The cress looks really healthy and it has turned to a rich green. The cress has grown to 1.8 cm.’In the school grounds, Manushree spotted different kinds of plants and asked questions about theirsimilarities and differences. She made some sketches and wrote down some of her questions, which werelater discussed in class.Next steps Investigation of the effects of water, warmth and light on plant growth.Assessment commentaryThe evidence here shows Manushree using her accurate observational skills, identifyingsimilarities, differences and changes, and asking relevant questions. She considers how the workof scientists at Kew helps plants.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  21. 21. 21 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyManushree asks thoughtful questions relating to her observations and measurements, and appliesstraightforward evidence to these and to other questions. She is confident with identifying differences,similarities or changes, and using simple physical models.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceShe recognises application of specific ideas such as aided pollination and can link properties such asopacity to applications. Manushree can relate science to everyday life and work.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceManushree uses appropriate forms of scientific language through her work. Given guidance here, shepresents simple data in tables and in a bar chart.AF4 Using investigative approachesAlthough much of the evidence here is investigative work, most of it involves qualitative rather thanquantitative data. She does, however, show good observational skill in all the work.AF5 Working critically with evidenceManushree is beginning to specify the evidence that she uses to reach a conclusion, and to suggestimprovements to an investigation, giving reasons. She can identify patterns and link cause to effect.Overall assessment judgementManushree is working at secure level 3 having made good progress during Year 3. The evidence here isdrawn from two terms’ work. She is beginning to satisfy level 4 criteria in some assessment focuses, albeittentatively, and it will not be long before she is at low level 4, particularly if she is encouraged to work withqualitative data whenever possible.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  22. 22. 22 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 3 and 4 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically with applications and implications of collaborating in science approaches evidence science L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 4 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Use scientific ideas when describing  Describe some simple positive  Select appropriate ways of  Decide when it is appropriate to carry  Identify patterns in data presented simple processes or phenomena and negative consequences of presenting scientific data out fair tests in investigations in various formats, including line  Use simple models to describe scientific and technological  Use appropriate scientific forms of  Select appropriate equipment or graphs scientific ideas developments language to communicate information sources to address  Draw straightforward conclusions  Identify scientific evidence that is  Recognise applications of specific scientific ideas, processes or specific questions or ideas under from data presented in various being used to support or refute scientific ideas phenomena investigation formats ideas or arguments  Identify aspects of science used  Use scientific and mathematical  Make sets of observations or  Identify scientific evidence they within particular jobs or roles conventions when communicating measurements, identifying the ranges have used in drawing conclusions information or ideas and intervals used  Suggest improvements to their  Identify possible risks to themselves working methods, giving reasons and others  L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 3 practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Identify differences, similarities or  Explain the purposes of a variety  Present simple scientific data in  Identify one or more control variables  Identify straightforward patterns in changes related to simple scientific of scientific or technological more than one way, including in investigations from those provided observations or in data presented ideas, processes or phenomena developments tables and bar charts  Select equipment or information in various formats, including  Respond to ideas given to them to  Link applications to specific  Use scientific forms of language sources from those provided to tables, pie and bar charts answer questions or suggest characteristics or properties when communicating simple address a question or idea under  Describe what they have found out solutions to problems  Identify aspects of our lives, or of scientific ideas, processes or investigation in experiments or investigations,  Represent things in the real world the work that people do, which are phenomena  Make some accurate observations or linking cause and effect using simple physical models based on scientific ideas  Identify simple advantages of whole number measurements  Suggest improvements to their  Use straightforward scientific working together on experiments relevant to questions or ideas under working methods evidence to answer questions, or to or investigations investigation support their findings  Recognise obvious risks when prompted    BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 3 Secure 3  High 3 Low 4 Secure 4 High 4 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009
  23. 23. 23 of 23 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgementsAstra Zeneca assessment materials © Astra Zeneca Science Teaching Trust.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-08 © Crown copyright 2009

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