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Pri app sci_std_file_y1_s2

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Pri app sci_std_file_y1_s2

  1. 1. 1 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAPP primary science standardsfile: Emma (Year 1 secure level 2)Child profileEmma is a Year 1 child with an autumn birthday and so is relatively old for her year group. The evidencehere shows her making good progress from level 1 to secure level 2.The evidence1. Describing and sorting materials2. Investigating waterproof materials3. Investigating magnetic materials4. Investigating absorbent materials5. Light and dark6. Investigating reflective materials7. Looking at rainbowsQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  2. 2. 2 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science1 Describing and sorting materialsAssessment focusesAF1, AF3ContextThe evidence here is from the start of a materials topic. The children used a computer game to help them tobecome familiar with words that might be new, such as ‘rigid’, ‘magnetic’, and so on. The vocabulary wasalso made available on a classroom display.They chose some objects from around the classroom including fabrics, metals, plastics and woods, andused the new terms to describe them to a friend, writing some of them down.They then each chose a small selection of materials and decided how to sort them. Each child made adisplay of their categories.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  3. 3. 3 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  4. 4. 4 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesEmma could describe a pencil as ‘rigid’, ‘hard’ and ‘non-magnetic’, and with guidance she could write theseterms and copy a picture of a pencil. She could use the same terms for a magnifying glass, adding‘transparent’, and drawing her own picture.Emma sorted the materials independently, choosing her own criteria for grouping. She was confident insaying that all materials could go in the hoops because they were either rough or smooth. She explainedthat it was necessary to feel the materials in order to sort them.Next steps Pooling of the children’s ideas, looking at the different ways in which they have chosen to classify the materials, first of all working in small groups and then in discussion involving the whole class. Looking at further properties of materials that cannot necessarily be examined by direct observation, and require further investigation.Assessment commentaryEmma can answers questions by drawing on her observations and can make comparisons betweenfeatures of materials. She is beginning to use simple scientific vocabulary to describe observed propertiesand uses a simple graphic form of display based on a format provided.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  5. 5. 5 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science2 Investigating waterproof materialsAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe teacher set the scene for the investigation, telling the children that the class bear would like to go outfor a walk in the rain. The children decided he would need a coat, and that it would have to be waterproof.The children were provided with different samples of materials, small pots of water, paper towels, anddropper pipettes.They spent some time talking with their partners, thinking about how they could investigate the bestmaterials to make a coat. Emma then wrote her own independent plan and carried out her investigation.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  6. 6. 6 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  7. 7. 7 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesEmma placed the paper towel on the table with the test material on top of it (although she had stated thatshe would put the paper towel on the material). She measured the same volume of water for each testmaterial. She also suggested that she would need to wait for a minute before checking the paper towel, ‘togive it time to run through’.She could relate the visible holes in the sponge to the leakage of water through it.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  8. 8. 8 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Discussion of practical problems when carrying out investigations to consider different ways in which things could be done. Researching non-waterproof materials to see if they all have holes in them.Assessment commentaryEmma draws on evidence to think about why the sponge let water through, and uses her direct observationof the sponge to answer this question. Her simple table shows an appropriate presentation of observations.She suggests how to find out about waterproof materials (although her written statement does not matchher actual procedure) and she uses her senses and the equipment to make observations. She shows thatshe is able to provide a clear report of her observations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  9. 9. 9 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science3 Investigating magnetic materialsAssessment focusesAF1, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children had the chance to play with magnets, and were set the task of finding out which materialswere magnetic from a selection provided. They talked about this in groups, and were asked to then recordwhat they intended to do, independently, in words and with a simple diagram.A table format for recording their observations was suggested to them. They were then asked to recordwhat they had found out from their observations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  10. 10. 10 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  11. 11. 11 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesEmma talked confidently within her group, sharing her ideas with others. She told the group that shethought the metal things would stick to the magnet.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  12. 12. 12 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceShe wrote her plan in clear steps and carried out her investigation on her own, using the equipmentcorrectly and safely.She noticed that a penny didn’t stick to her magnet at first, and she stated that that ‘couldn’t be right’, soshe tried again with another magnet.Next steps Identifying other questions about materials that can be investigated by simple experimentation. Researching to find out which metals are magnetic and finding out why some pennies are magnetic and some others are not.Assessment commentaryEmma compares the materials available. She can present her observations appropriately, produce a simplewritten plan and identify observations that can help her to answer a question. She reports on what shesees, making predictions and providing explanations in the process, and she can respond to unexpectedobservations.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  13. 13. 13 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science4 Investigating absorbent materialsAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children watched a video to set the scene for an investigation. Discovery Dog* has a puddle to cleanup and he tries to use a plastic bag to do it. Emma was asked to work with three other children to plan andcarry out an investigation to find a better material. For the first part of their discussion the teacher acted asscribe, capturing the ideas of the group. These are shown on the Discovery Dog template.* Published by Millgate House Education Ltd. Created by Kate Blacklock, Jan Childe, Debbie Eccles and Peter Atkinson (and produced by LancashireCounty Council) for children age 5–7.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  14. 14. 14 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidence happens.‘Discovery Dog’ published by Millgate House Education Ltd. Created by K. Blacklock, J. Childe, D. Eccles and P. Atkinson Copyright ©Lancashire County Council. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  15. 15. 15 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesEmma verbally contributed to the discussion, talking about mopping up a spill at home.She listened to the ideas of others and responded to their suggestions. She made sure that everyone madea contribution, suggesting to one child that they could do the timing as they were wearing a watch.She knew that she had to wait a minute and look at the puddle to see if it had been soaked up.She demonstrated an understanding of controlling variables, insisting to her group that they needed a timerso that they could leave every piece of material for the same length of time. Once she had been shown thepipettes she suggested using the same amount of water for each puddle.See the audio clip of a teacher talking about Emma’s work available on the National Strategies web area(go to www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies and browse the primary standards files or searchfor ‘APP science standards file: Emma’).Next steps Comparison of different approaches used by different groups, so that the children learn about different ideas, and find out what works well and what does not. Consideration of different ways that results from investigations can be presented.Assessment commentaryEmma links her work in science with familiar contexts and previous work. She shows that she canrecognise the contributions of another child when working together and makes suggestions about how toinvestigate the problem.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  16. 16. 16 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science5 Light and darkAssessment focusesAF2, AF3, AF4, AF5ContextThe children carried out a series of activities: Pictures of light sources – working in pairs, children looked for light sources around the school, making observations with photographic records to compare them. Seeing inside a dark box – again in pairs, children chose appropriate equipment to look inside a dark box. Ideas about light and dark – children worked individually to mind-map their ideas about light and dark.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  17. 17. 17 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidencePictures of light sourcesTeacher’s notesAs well as identifying that the common features were glass and electricity, Emma could identify the roles ofdifferent lights – outside security light for scaring away burglars and to light up the car park at night,spotlights for the wall display, and strip lights for the whole hall.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  18. 18. 18 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceSeeing inside a dark boxTeacher’s notesEmma understood how a friend could help in an investigation, saying that she needed help to shine thetorch and look into the other end of the dark box.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  19. 19. 19 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceIdeas about light and darkNext steps Research into different light sources used in historical times before the discovery of electricity. Consideration of the disadvantages of excessive use of electrical light sources.Assessment commentaryEmma discusses the helpfulness of light sources inside and outside the school, and she illustrates herpersonal responses to light and dark. She uses appropriate scientific language in talking and writing abouther ideas about light sources and in explaining the importance of the Sun. She selects and uses the torchto see detail inside the dark box, and she reports on what she has done and seen.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  20. 20. 20 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science6 Investigating reflective materialsAssessment focusesAF1, AF4, AF5ContextThe children worked in groups to find out about reflection from the surfaces of different materials. TheDiscovery Dog template was used to introduce the investigation and provide a structure. They were toldthat a dog had been lost at night and needed a new collar so that she could be found more easily if ithappened again.Discovery Dog, published by Millgate House Education Ltd. Created by K. Blacklock, J. Childe, D. Eccles and P. Atkinson Copyright © LancashireCounty Council. Used with kind permission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  21. 21. 21 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceSee the video clip of Emma talking about working together on reflecting light, available on theNational Strategies web area (go to www.standards.dcsf.gov.uk/nationalstrategies andbrowse the primary standards files or search for ‘APP science standards file: Emma’).Teacher’s notesEmma did not make a prediction but she participated fully in the shared activity. She recorded the findingsusing ticks and crosses, as she had done for previous activities, to show whether she thought that thematerial did or did not reflect. She used the word ‘reflect’ without prompting.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  22. 22. 22 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceNext steps Observation and exploration of the idea that surfaces always reflect some light to varying degrees, rather than simply being reflective or non-reflective. Introduction of simple ideas about how light travels and how the direction it travels can be represented in diagrams by arrows.Assessment commentaryEmma works effectively in the group, and is able to state her own contribution and that of others, and sherecords the findings in a simple table. She uses the torch in making her observations and she reports whathappened.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  23. 23. 23 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science7 Looking at rainbowsAssessment focusesAF1, AF2, AF3ContextThe class were thinking about rainbows, looking at pictures and using a Primary Upd8 activity, ‘SeeingRainbows’ (www.primaryupd8.org.uk), to consider the conditions needed for seeing them. They wereasked to say why the conditions on each of the five Upd8 images would or would not produce a rainbow,and to draw their own picture to show what the requirements are.Seeing Rainbows Primary Upd8 www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  24. 24. 24 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceThe evidenceTaken from Primary Upd8 www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kind permissionQCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  25. 25. 25 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceTeacher’s notesIn the class discussion, Emma showed that she knew that sunlight and rain were needed to see a rainbow.Next steps Work in a group to produce a rainbow effect on paper using a glass of water in sunlight.Assessment commentaryEmma correctly states the conditions needed to make a rainbow and then uses this to answer thequestions and draw a pictorial representation. She records ticks and crosses on the Upd8 sheet and alsoprovides some written notes to explain her thinking. Her pictorial representation shows some good scientificideas with light being represented by arrows.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  26. 26. 26 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAssessment summaryAF1 Thinking scientificallyEmma can use observations and ideas to answer questions. She can develop her own criteria forcomparing features of materials, and sort them on the basis of her observations. She is able to identifyevidence needed to answer a question.AF2 Understanding the applications and implications of scienceShe can express personal opinions on the importance of light sources, and about the experiences of lightand dark, and she recognises that ‘glass’ and ‘electricity’ are features shared by useful light sources in herschool.AF3 Communicating and collaborating in scienceEmma uses simple tables to present information she has collected, and shows a developing vocabulary ofscientific terms. She can present sequenced ideas using words and images. In pairs and in larger groups,Emma shows that she can work well with others.AF4 Using investigative approachesEmma can choose her own methods in her testing of materials, using equipment correctly to make relevantobservations.AF5 Working critically with evidenceEmma makes predictions and compares them with actual observations. She can report on her observationsverbally and in writing. In the event of an outcome that she does not expect, she makes further observation.Overall assessment judgementThe work was carried out over two terms. Emma had already made good progress to level 1 at the start ofthis period, and the evidence here shows that she is working at secure level 2 across all assessmentfocuses. Further progress could be made through carrying out investigative work that involves working withnumerical data. Over the the rest of the year Emma should also be provided with further opportunities todemonstrate her skills and understanding, particularly within attainment target 2.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  27. 27. 27 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary science APP primary science assessment guidelines: levels 1 and 2 AF1 – Thinking scientifically AF2 – Understanding the applications AF3 – Communicating and AF4 – Using investigative AF5 – Working critically and implications of science collaborating in science approaches with evidence L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 2 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Draw on their observations and  Express personal feelings or opinions about  Present their ideas and evidence in  Make some suggestions about how  Say what happened in their ideas to offer answers to scientific or technological phenomena appropriate ways to find things out or how to collect experiment or investigation questions data to answer a question or idea  Describe, in familiar contexts, how science  Respond to prompts by using simple texts  Say whether what happened they are investigating  Make comparisons between basic helps people do things and electronic media to find information was what they expected, features or components of  Identify things to measure or acknowledging any  Identify people who use science to help  Use simple scientific vocabulary to describe objects, living things or events observe that are relevant to the unexpected outcomes others their ideas and observations question or idea they are  Sort and group objects, living  Respond to prompts to suggest  Identify scientific or technological  Work together on an experiment or investigating things or events on the basis of different ways they could have phenomena and say whether or not they are investigation and recognise contributions what they have observed  Correctly use equipment provided to done things helpful made by others make observations and  Respond to suggestions to measurements identify some evidence (in the form of information, observations  Make measurements, using or measurements) needed to standard or non-standard units as answer a question appropriate     L Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and practical Across a range of contexts and Across a range of contexts and 1 practical situations pupils: situations pupils: situations pupils: practical situations pupils: practical situations pupils:  Ask questions stimulated by their  Identify a link to science in familiar objects  Use everyday terms to describe simple  Respond to prompts by making  Respond to prompts to say exploration of their world or contexts features or actions of objects, living things some simple suggestions about how what happened or events they observe to find an answer or make  Recognise basic features of  Recognise scientific and technological  Say what has changed when observations objects, living things or events developments that help us  Present evidence they have collected in observing objects, living things simple templates provided for them  Use their senses and simple or events  Draw on their everyday equipment to make observations experience to help answer  Communicate simple features or questions components of objects, living things or events they have observed in appropriate  Respond to suggestions to forms identify some evidence (in the form of information, observations  Share their own ideas and listen to the ideas or measurements) that has been of others used to answer a question BL IEOverall assessment (tick one box only) Low 1 Secure 1  High 1 Low 2 Secure 2  High 2 QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009
  28. 28. 28 of 28 The National Strategies  Primary Assessing Pupils’ Progress in primary scienceAcknowledgements‘Discovery Dog’ published by Millgate House Education Ltd. Created by K. Blacklock, J. Childe,D. Eccles and P. Atkinson Copyright © Lancashire County Council. Used with kind permission.Primary Upd8, www.primaryupd8.org.uk © Association for Science Education. Used with kindpermission.QCDA 01063-2009PDF-EN-05 © Crown copyright 2009

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