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Ross Parry, University of Leicester, UK
Doris Ruth Eikhof, CAMEo Research Institute,
University of Leicester, UK
Sally-Ann...
Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales
National Museums Scotland
National Army Museum
Royal Pavilion & Museums Brighton a...

1Digital is increasingly
seen as part of
everyone’s skill set and all
roles have some kind of
digital element

2Digital is becoming
professionalised in the
museum as digital roles
and responsibilities
become standard
practice

3As digital becomes
institutionalised,
museums are
restructuring and
evolving

4Museums are exploring,
learning and demanding
new digital skills as they
innovate and create with
digital

5There is a deeper
understanding by
museums of the digital
skills, knowledge and
expertise needed

6Museums are engaging
increasingly in evidence-
based digital practice

7Currently, there is little
evidence that museums
are systematically
assessing and identifying
digital skills needs

There is little evidence of
in-house formal and
planned training around
digital skills or digital
literacy
8

9There are different
practices in how digital
responsibilities and skills
are distributed managed
and shared across UK
m...
Centralised
Digital Model
Hub & Spoke
Digital Model
Distributive
Digital Model
Centralised
Digital Model
Skills are centralised; it is
difficult to build digital literacies
and to instil confidence in
...
Hub & Spoke
Digital Model
Skills are located in the hub and
across spokes; skills are shared
and there is potential to bui...
Distributive
Digital Model
Skills are shared; individual digital
literacies are built upon, instilling
confidence in other...

10There is evidence of an
assumption in museums
that 'digital skills' relate to
a specific set of technical
competencies
Prioritising specific
technical skills
Recruiting
a particular
set of qualifications
and expertise
Siloed and
traditional
...
Prioritising specific
technical skills
Recruiting
a particular
set of qualifications
and expertise
Siloed and
traditional
...
Prioritising specific
technical skills
Recruiting
a particular
set of qualifications
and expertise
Siloed and
traditional
...
 one-by-one.uk
MW18 Presentation: Development, Supply, Deployment, Demand: Balancing The Museum Digital Skills Ecosystem:First Findings
MW18 Presentation: Development, Supply, Deployment, Demand: Balancing The Museum Digital Skills Ecosystem:First Findings
MW18 Presentation: Development, Supply, Deployment, Demand: Balancing The Museum Digital Skills Ecosystem:First Findings
MW18 Presentation: Development, Supply, Deployment, Demand: Balancing The Museum Digital Skills Ecosystem:First Findings
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MW18 Presentation: Development, Supply, Deployment, Demand: Balancing The Museum Digital Skills Ecosystem:First Findings

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By Ross Parry, University of Leicester, UK, Doris Ruth Eikhof, CAMEo Research Institute, University of Leicester, United Kingdom , Sally-Anne Barnes, Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick, UK, Erika Kispeter, University of Warwick, United KIngdom

Skills matter. The digital literacy of the workforce remains one of the key challenges for the adoption of technology within museums (NMC, 2015; 2016). According to Nesta, the AHRC and ACE (2014; 2015), over a third of museums in England still feel that they do not have the in-house skills to meet their digital aspirations, and rather than improving, some digital skills areas have decreased. The latest findings (Nesta and ACE, 2017) report a "lack of confidence" as a barrier—more so than the cultural sector as a whole.

Addressing this pressing issue, the aim of the UK’s "One by One" national project, is to work over the next two years to understand how to deliver a transformative framework for museum workforce digital literacy. This paper is the first sharing, internationally, of the emerging findings of the initial phase of the "One by One" research.

Combining museology with leading-edge employment studies, the paper attempts to evidence the development, supply, demand, and deployment of digital skills in the UK museum sector, identifying key actors and mapping typical employment patterns and skills policies. The paper shares how digital skills are currently developed and recruited, how demand is articulated, what skills gaps exist, and what challenges impede skill development and deployment.

Furthermore, it explores the shift from "technical skills" to "digital literacies" — what this shift represents, and the facilitators and inhibitors related to this shift that are recognized within the sector.

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MW18 Presentation: Development, Supply, Deployment, Demand: Balancing The Museum Digital Skills Ecosystem:First Findings

  1. 1. Ross Parry, University of Leicester, UK Doris Ruth Eikhof, CAMEo Research Institute, University of Leicester, UK Sally-Anne Barnes, Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick, UK, Erika Kispeter, University of Warwick, UK Development, supply, deployment, demand: Balancing the museum digital skills ecosystem  one-by-one.uk
  2. 2. Amgueddfa Cymru - National Museum Wales National Museums Scotland National Army Museum Royal Pavilion & Museums Brighton and Hove Derby Museums Trust Museum of London Museums Association Association of Independent Museums Arts Council England Museum Development Network Culture24 School of Museum Studies, and CAMEo (Research Institute for Cultural and Media Economies),University of Leicester Institute for Employment Research, University of Warwick Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, US Faculty of Art Design & Architecture, Monash University, Australia Heritage Lottery Fund National Museums Directors Conference Collections Trust Nesta FutureLearn
  3. 3.  1Digital is increasingly seen as part of everyone’s skill set and all roles have some kind of digital element
  4. 4.  2Digital is becoming professionalised in the museum as digital roles and responsibilities become standard practice
  5. 5.  3As digital becomes institutionalised, museums are restructuring and evolving
  6. 6.  4Museums are exploring, learning and demanding new digital skills as they innovate and create with digital
  7. 7.  5There is a deeper understanding by museums of the digital skills, knowledge and expertise needed
  8. 8.  6Museums are engaging increasingly in evidence- based digital practice
  9. 9.  7Currently, there is little evidence that museums are systematically assessing and identifying digital skills needs
  10. 10.  There is little evidence of in-house formal and planned training around digital skills or digital literacy 8
  11. 11.  9There are different practices in how digital responsibilities and skills are distributed managed and shared across UK museums
  12. 12. Centralised Digital Model Hub & Spoke Digital Model Distributive Digital Model
  13. 13. Centralised Digital Model Skills are centralised; it is difficult to build digital literacies and to instil confidence in others. Digital activity is co-ordinated and consistent. Consequently, there can be a lack of innovation and creativity, a slowness to adopt digital, and digital is not integral to thinking.
  14. 14. Hub & Spoke Digital Model Skills are located in the hub and across spokes; skills are shared and there is potential to build on individual digital literacies and to instil confidence. Digital skills can be developed more easily as a sense of shared digital learning, test and learn ethos accepted There is a need to have digitally confident people in place, and a need to allow people to test and learn.
  15. 15. Distributive Digital Model Skills are shared; individual digital literacies are built upon, instilling confidence in others. When fully distributed, there is a strong learning culture, easily able to develop digital literacy amongst workforce. There is a need to have a shared understanding across organisation, clear strategy, where not fully distributed then at risk of learning/ideas not shared.
  16. 16.  10There is evidence of an assumption in museums that 'digital skills' relate to a specific set of technical competencies
  17. 17. Prioritising specific technical skills Recruiting a particular set of qualifications and expertise Siloed and traditional forms of training Limitations in how finite technical competencies can be used demand deployment supply development The museum digital skills ecosystem
  18. 18. Prioritising specific technical skills Recruiting a particular set of qualifications and expertise Siloed and traditional forms of training Limitations in how finite technical competencies can be used Prioritising a wider digital literacy Recruiting varied forms of competence and confidence Flexibility in how adaptable workforce can have influence An agile and responsive learning culture The museum digital skills ecosystem development deployment supply demand
  19. 19. Prioritising specific technical skills Recruiting a particular set of qualifications and expertise Siloed and traditional forms of training Limitations in how finite technical competencies can be used Prioritising a wider digital literacy Recruiting varied forms of competence and confidence Flexibility in how adaptable workforce can have influence An agile and responsive learning culture adapting demand adapting deployment adaptingsupply adaptingdevelopment The museum digital skills ecosystem
  20. 20.  one-by-one.uk

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