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Community Engagement through User Experience

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By Michael Tedeschi, Interactive Mechanics

User Experience (UX) is how your visitors feel about a product or service, whether you’re designing a website, an exhibit, or a toaster. How do you know if your target audience is having a good or bad experience? Learn to put yourself in your users’ shoes in order to better understand their motivations, so that you can create a welcoming experience and make something that is useful, easy to use, and enjoyable for them.

We’ll cover the fundamentals of user experience, why it matters, and we’ll detail a typical UX journey and common methodologies that are useful for museum professionals, emphasizing ways to engage new and existing communities along the way. We’ll practice research techniques, including interviews and contextual inquiries (observing the way your visitors already interact with your exhibits), that allow you to learn about your visitors’ objectives, rather than designing from assumptions. We’ll develop personas to clarify which new audiences you want to connect with, and what works best for them, asking questions like, Why aren’t they users already? What barriers does your museum present? What needs could you be meeting?

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Community Engagement through User Experience

  1. 1. Community Engagement through User Experience M U S E U M S A N D T H E W E B 2 0 1 8
  2. 2. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Today’s agenda • What is user experience (UX)? • Why does user experience matter? • UX methodologies that engage audiences • Relevant case studies • Resources for further learning
  3. 3. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Introduce yourself! • Your name, role and organization • What are you interested in learning today? • Are you working on a project where this may apply?
  4. 4. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H About Interactive Mechanics Interactive Mechanics is an award-winning interactive design firm that partners with museums and archives on design, development, user experience, and digital strategy to build interactive websites, online collections, mobile applications, and in-gallery digital experiences.
  5. 5. What is user experience?
  6. 6. How do you define user experience? D I S C U S S I O N B R E A K
  7. 7. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What is user experience? User experience (UX) focuses on having a deep understanding of users, what they need, what they value, their business goals and objectives, their abilities, and also their limitations. Usability.gov
  8. 8. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What is user experience? User experience encompasses all aspects of the end- user’s interaction with a company, its services, and its products. Nielsen Norman Group
  9. 9. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What is UX, really? User experience isn’t just testing or research or the tools that we will talk about today. It is a mentality that your users are the priority, and by understanding them (their needs, goals, motivations, and expectations) you can build successful experiences for them.
  10. 10. What is community engagement?
  11. 11. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What is comm. engagement? In an ideal situation, community engagement is a term for connecting people to your organization... Community engagement needs to be about inviting people into the museum community rather than demanding people use the museum the “right way”. Brilliant Idea Studio
  12. 12. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What is comm. engagement? Community engagement is consulting, involving, and collaborating with people outside your museum. It is relationship building, the foundation of which is listening and learning to improve our museums.
  13. 13. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Community engagement + UX The user experience process is inherently based on involving our audiences—it’s a natural fit.
  14. 14. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H So, we want to... • Understand and involve our audiences • Create with our audiences, not for them • Engage our audiences to validate our ideas
  15. 15. We all know bad experiences.
  16. 16. ... so let’s have one together.
  17. 17. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H If you’re the participant • Follow the instructions using the square paper to attempt to build the origami crane. • Speak aloud your thoughts, frustrations, and feelings. If you feel confused or have questions, say them! Start with a square heet of paper. Fold it in half and then in half again. 1 Turn the paper over and repeat the previous step. 6 Place your thumb under the top of the sheet, pulling it to the right to form a square. Crease the fold. 2 Fold right and left corners to center, and crease. Turn the paper over and repeat the step. 7 Fold the right flap to the left, turn the paper over and, once again, fold the right flap to the left. 8 Fold the two lower points up between the two flaps on each side. 9 Swing the top tips out slightly, and crease. Fold one tip downward to form the head. 10 Spread the wings and crease. Blow a little air into the hole underneath to fill out the body. 11 origami crane EASY FOLDING INSTRUCTIONS Turn the paper over and repeat the last step. 3 Fold the right and left corners to the center line, crease the folds, and reopen. 4 Grasp the lower tip and pull up. Fold at the top third of the diamond. Note that the right and left corners will swing to the center. Fold along creases. 5
  18. 18. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H If you’re the moderator • Observe the participant as they complete the activity and note their successes, failures, and areas where you might make improvements. • Do not answer questions or provide help, but stay engaged as they work through the exercise.
  19. 19. What did you learn, observe, or feel?
  20. 20. What is a good user experience?
  21. 21. Apple
  22. 22. Gallery One
  23. 23. Ask Brooklyn Museum
  24. 24. What is a good museum experience you’ve had lately? D I S C U S S I O N B R E A K
  25. 25. Why does user experience matter?
  26. 26. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Why does it matter? If people don’t enjoy their experience with what you design (whether its an educational program, exhibit, mobile app, or toaster), then the product/service wasn’t successful. Bad user experience can ruin a brand or company, and lose customers.
  27. 27. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Why does it matter? People remember bad experiences. Think about the last time you ate at a bad restaurant—perhaps they messed up your order or the service was bad, or the dinner was simply unmemorable. Will you go back? Probably not.
  28. 28. Common Methodologies
  29. 29. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Qualitative Heuristic evaluation Content audit User stories Persona development Surveying Analytics review A/B Testing Interviews Card sorting Usability testing Contextual inquiry Focus groups Design studiosJourney mapping LowEngagement HighEngagement Quanitative
  30. 30. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Qualitative Heuristic evaluation Content audit User stories Persona development Surveying Analytics review A/B Testing Interviews Card sorting Usability testing Contextual inquiry Focus groups Design studiosJourney mapping LowEngagement HighEngagement Quanitative
  31. 31. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H We’ll focus on... • Developing personas and prioritizing audiences • Conducting design studios / charrettes • Prototyping and evaluating concepts
  32. 32. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Disclaimer! We’re going to practice these methodologies as a group today, and we’ll weave in practices for incorporating communities/audiences throughout with examples and case studies.
  33. 33. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Split into groups of 4-6
  34. 34. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Today’s mock project Improving the Museums and the Web experience.
  35. 35. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Today’s mock project Improving the Museums and the Web experience. We all love Museums and the Web, but how could we make our experience better? The MW18 committee has asked us (well, not really) to help them understand their audiences, brainstorm solutions, and test them with attendees during the conference.
  36. 36. How do we incorporate UX on a limited budget? D I S C U S S I O N B R E A K
  37. 37. Understanding audiences
  38. 38. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Define our audience groups On post-it notes, identify the audiences that experience MW. There are a number of different ways to break down our audiences: title, number of times attended, reason for attending, role at MW, etc. Add these to the “I am...” section of your sheet. You won’t capture everyone today—that’s okay!
  39. 39. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What do they do? On post-it notes, define the actions that these audiences take before, during and after the MW events. What do they do?
  40. 40. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What do they do? What do they want/need? On post-it notes, define the actions that these audiences take before, during and after the MW events. What do they do? On post-it notes, define the wants and needs that people have related to MW. What are the absolutes?
  41. 41. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Next, prioritize your audiences Who are your primary, secondary, and tertiary audiences? Who will be the primary focus of your solutions? Each person in your group gets to vote for one audience to focus on for today’s project.
  42. 42. Persona development
  43. 43. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H What are personas? Personas are a tool (in user experience, marketing, design thinking) to help translate your research and understanding of your audiences and summarize them into well-defined archetypes.
  44. 44. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Personas can... • Help inform decisions (in design, features, priorities) • Distribute your audience research with your team • Consolidate data into a useful format • Create an emotional connection to your users • Identify gaps in information or knowledge
  45. 45. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Personas can’t... • Serve as an alternative to audience or user research • Be static (they should evolve over time) • Capture every piece of data or information you have • Be created in a vacuum or individually
  46. 46. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Personas typically include... • Personal: Name, age, gender, accessibility • Background: Family, professional • Education: Highest level of education, mastery • Technical: Types of tech, familiarity, apps/programs • Motivation: Goals, motivators, wants, needs • Constraints: Limitations, fears, concerns
  47. 47. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Good personas... • Are accurate and realistic • Consider how your personas may grow or develop • Consider both current and aspirational audiences • Tell a believable, compelling story • Paint a picture for the reader
  48. 48. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Community action groups Invite your audiences to community groups to participate in the design process. Collect a diverse group of people to be involved in defining who they are from the get-go and learn about what they want, need, expect, and want to do at your institution.
  49. 49. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H But, how? Look at your audiences and consider how you can reach them. Where are they already? What lateral connections can you make to reach these audiences (other groups, community organizations or centers, schools)? Consider, how can you incentivize them to participate?
  50. 50. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Consider their time/effort Be clear about the investment of their time upfront. Plan your requests or meetings on a schedule that is feasible for them (e.g. after standard work hours), and be sensitive to the amount of effort you’re requiring. Make it easy for them to participate without having to sacrifice.
  51. 51. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H
  52. 52. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H
  53. 53. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H
  54. 54. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H
  55. 55. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Now, we’ll create a persona Which audience group/category did you prioritze? For today’s exercise, we’ll focus on that group and create a persona to represent it. We’ll use them again throughout today’s workshop. While we don’t have real data to use today, we can use our own ancedotal experience to go through the steps.
  56. 56. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H
  57. 57. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Personas typically include... • Personal: Name, age, gender, accessibility • Background: Family, professional • Education: Highest level of education, mastery • Technical: Types of tech, familiarity, apps/programs • Motivation: Goals, motivators, wants, needs • Constraints: Limitations, fears, concerns
  58. 58. Case Study
  59. 59. Interviewing Users: How to Uncover Compelling Insights Steve Portigal
  60. 60. Journey Mapping
  61. 61. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Journey mapping Journey mapping expands on your personas and outlines the pathways that your users can take through an experience.
  62. 62. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Journey mapping It is a way to visualize these pathways by exploring what people do, how they feel, and what they’re thinking each step of the way. It’s a great way to identify where people might struggle and also opportunities for improvement.
  63. 63. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H B E F O R E D O I N G touchpoints actions needs, wants expectations mood F E E L I N G T H I N K I N G D U R I N G A F T E R
  64. 64. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Journey mapping tips Start with observation Conduct observations and interviews with audiences to understand the steps they take, potential frustrations or pain points, and other outstanding moments.
  65. 65. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Journey mapping tips Invite back your community action group Survey or inteview your community action group to help understand their journey. If they’re not current going to the museum, understand where on the journey they drop off (or, if they don’t even start the journey, why?).
  66. 66. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Journey mapping tips Acknowledge your assumptions As you go through this process, you may run into steps where you assume. Challenge those assumptions by inviting in different perspectives from your institution or conducting additional research.
  67. 67. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Journey mapping tips Validate your journey maps Once you’ve created them, share back the journey map to your audiences to gather feedback. Where does it deviate from the individual’s experience? What additional information (pain points or areas of opportunity) can you identify?
  68. 68. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Create a journey map In your group, follow the journey for your persona through the steps of their experience: from considering attending Museums and the Web through attending the conference to post-event follow-up. Identify the major actions/touchpoints, how they feel, and what they are thinking. Use your “I am doing” and “I want/need” to inform your journey map.
  69. 69. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Create a journey map Next, using stickers, identify areas of opportunity (green) and pain points (red). In the next exercise, we’ll explore solutions to these challenge areas.
  70. 70. Design studios
  71. 71. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio Sometimes called “participatory design”. A design studio is an opportunity to engage your audiences directly in the design process, allowing you to co-create with your audiences and invite new perspectives.
  72. 72. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio tips Start by introducing the challenge Make sure that everyone involved is on the same page about the challenge you’re trying to solve. Introduce the idea of the session and format.
  73. 73. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio tips Combine individual and group brainstorming Some people work well in groups, while some people work better individually. To get a variety of ideas, use a combination of individual and group brainstorming activities so everyone can have a voice.
  74. 74. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio tips Explore different participant’s ideas Use activities that promote collaboration and include opportunities to provide feedback on each other’s ideas.
  75. 75. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio tips Use “rules” for brainstorming Defer judgment - don’t judge ideas until it’s time to do so Encourage wild ideas - be broad in your thinking Build on the ideas of others - use each other to further your thinking Stay focused on the topic (and on time) Be visual - if you can draw, sketch, or prototype the idea, go for it
  76. 76. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio tips Bring in your Community Action Groups Invite in your Community Groups to participate in your design studio. Invite them to bring a guest to expand the participants and get different perspectives. Have your participants vote on the ideas they are most interested in or excited by.
  77. 77. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Design studio tips Set up the design studio in a rest area If you want to involve people as they go through your museum, set up your studio in an rest area (nearby the cafe or common seating areas) to attract people that need a place to relax and sit.
  78. 78. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Conduct a design studio In your group, pick an area of opportunity or pain point from your journey map to use to brainstorm. Over ten minutes, each person in the group will individually write down ideas for how to address this challenge. At the end, share back all ideas and then vote on the ideas you think resonate the most with your audience.
  79. 79. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Conduct a design studio Next, take one idea (or two, if you’re really torn) to expand on. At this point, sketch and draw ideas—they don’t need to be beautiful, they just need to get your point across. At the end of ten minutes, be prepared to share back the concept(s) to the group.
  80. 80. Gamestorming Dave Gray, Sunni Brown, James Macanufo
  81. 81. Case Study
  82. 82. User testing
  83. 83. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H User testing User testing is the key to ensure we’re building something people will enjoy and actually use. User testing doesn’t need to be expensive or time- consuming: small batches of regular testing are better than conducting one large, expensive test.
  84. 84. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H User testing tips Explain what you’re doing Be transparent about what you’re testing, the testing process, and what you’re trying to accomplish.
  85. 85. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H User testing tips Make your user tester feel comfortable Be sure to explain that user testing isn’t testing them—it’s testing what you built. Offer refreshments, be thankful.
  86. 86. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Make your user tester feel comfortable Be sure to explain that user testing isn’t testing them—it’s testing what you built. Offer refreshments, be thankful. “We’re not testing you, we’re testing the system.” — U S E F U L P H R A S E —
  87. 87. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Make your user tester feel comfortable Be sure to explain that user testing isn’t testing them—it’s testing what you built. Offer refreshments, be thankful. “There are no right right or wrong answers.” — U S E F U L P H R A S E —
  88. 88. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Make your user tester feel comfortable Be sure to explain that user testing isn’t testing them—it’s testing what you built. Offer refreshments, be thankful.“There is no ego involved here, we want to hear both positive and negative comments.” — U S E F U L P H R A S E —
  89. 89. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H User testing tips Stage engaged! Acknowledge and provide feedback to your participants as they ask questions or give feedback throughout the test.
  90. 90. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Stage engaged! Acknowledge and provide feedback to your participants as they ask questions or give feedback throughout the test. “Mmhmm. Interesting! Okay. Right.” — U S E F U L P H R A S E —
  91. 91. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H User testing tips Ask for clarification. If you need to know more, ask the participant. Remember that this is your time to get answers to your questions!
  92. 92. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Ask for clarification. If you need to know more, ask the participant. Remember that this is your time to get answers to your questions! “Talk me through what happened or why you did that.” — U S E F U L P H R A S E —
  93. 93. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Ask for clarification. If you need to know more, ask the participant. Remember that this is your time to get answers to your questions! “If you have to give this a letter grade, what would you rate it?” — U S E F U L P H R A S E —
  94. 94. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H The testing process Ask for clarification. If you need to know more, ask the participant. Remember that this is your time to get answers to your questions!
  95. 95. Common questions
  96. 96. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “How many participants?”
  97. 97. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “What do I need to prepare?” • How much time will it take? When? Where? • Why are you doing the test? • What are your trying to answer? • Who do you represent? • What are you offering participants? • Is this anonymous? Will you use the information?
  98. 98. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “How do I recruit people?” • Invite your communite action group(s). • Utilize people already in your space. • Work with marketing or development to recruit specific types of users (they know the people!).
  99. 99. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “Do I need a consent form?” • Best practice is to have one, even if as just a means to explain the tests. • If you have a consent form, explain it and have the participant fill it out with you. Provide them with a copy to take home and one for you to keep. • If you’re recording video, audio, or taking photos, be clear about how you will use those materials.
  100. 100. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “What kind of incentives?” • Do you need an incentive or gift? • Give something that is easy to cash in on, especially if you can give it out on the spot (like a gift card to your cafe, a return ticket to the museum, or a small gift from the gift shop).
  101. 101. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “Remote vs. in-person testing?” • Being present is always better than remote. • But there are really good user testing tools out there for conducting testing remotely or without being present. • Skype, Google Hangouts, or GoToMeeting • http://zurb.com/notable • http://www.userzoom.com/
  102. 102. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H “But... what do I test?” • Usability, bugs, or other issues • Competitive or comparative testing • Preference • Validation
  103. 103. Case Study
  104. 104. Additional Resources
  105. 105. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Free webinars • Interactive Mechanics http://www.interactivemechanics.com/workshops • UX Professionals Association https://uxpa.org/event/webinars
  106. 106. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Online training • Lynda.com on User Experience http://lynda.com • Susan Weinschenk’s Online Courses http://courses.theteamw.com • Interaction Design Foundation https://interaction-design.org
  107. 107. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Books • Just Enough Research by Erika Hall • User Experience Team of One by Leah Buley • 100 Things Every Designer... by Susan Weinschenk • Lean UX: Applying Lean Principles... by Jeff Gothelf • Designing for Emotion by Aarron Walter • Don’t Make Me Think by Steve Krug
  108. 108. Questions? Comments?
  109. 109. Thank you! M I K E @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H A N I C S . C O M
  110. 110. Community Engagement through User Experience I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H A N I C S . C O M / W O R K S H O P S F R E E W E B I N A R / M A Y 2 3 , 2 0 1 8 / 3 : 0 0 P M E T
  111. 111. Card sorting
  112. 112. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Card sorting An activity that allows users to organize or classify items into logical groupings, most useful for information architecture (like website structure or navigation) or workflows (exhibit flow, interactive content). It can be completed individually or collaboratively in small groups.
  113. 113. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Card sorting tips Create your content cards in advance Using index cards, write out your content (which can include terms, phrases, or functions). Aim for somewhere between 30 to 50 cards in a single sort.
  114. 114. Community Engagement through User Experience A P R I L 1 8 , 2 0 1 8 / @ I N T E R A C T I V E M E C H Card sorting tips Determine which type of card sort Choose between an open card sort (you predetermine the content, and users define those categories and order) or a closed card sort (you provide the categories and order, and users determine what content fits in those buckets).
  115. 115. Case Study

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