Uganda's statistical abstract 2009

3,031 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,031
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
33
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Uganda's statistical abstract 2009

  1. 1. UGANDA BUREAU OF STATISTICS 2009STATISTICAL ABSTRACT
  2. 2. FOREWORDThe 2009 Statistical Abstract is this year’s major annual publication from the UgandaBureau of Statistics. The abstract is part of Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS)efforts to support data user needs. The Bureau provides relevant, reliable and timelyofficial statistics needed to support evidence-based policy formulation and monitordevelopment outcomes. Statistical Abstracts present information derived fromsurveys, censuses and administrative records from Ministries, Departments andAgencies (MDAs). The statistics are compiled based on agreed standards,definitions and classifications in accordance with international principles andguidelines.Information contained in this year’s abstract covers socio-economic governmentsectors including, but not limited to, Environment, Population, Education, Health,Agriculture, Labour, Income and Expenditure, Energy, Business, National Accounts,Banking and Currency, Prices, Trade, Migration and Tourism, Transport andCommunication and Government Finance. This year, statistics on Informal Cross-Border Trade (ICBT) are also included. Presentations in this publication are in theform of tables, graphs and charts with explanatory text therein. Detailed tables on allchapters are appended. In addition, data from these tables may also be used forfurther analysis.UBOS appreciates the continued cooperation of MDAs in availing the requisite datain time to produce this publication. Special thanks go to UBOS technical staff whocompiled the 2009 Abstract.Copies of this publication are available at the Statistics House, Plot 9, Colville Street,Kampala. Further information can be obtained from the official UBOS website:www.ubos.orgWe sincerely hope that our stakeholders will find the information in this publicationuseful. UBOS continues to appreciate comments from stakeholders that are aimed atimproving the quality of our future publications.J. B. Male-Mukasa June 2009Executive Director
  3. 3. LIST OF ACRONYMSASL Above Sea LevelBATU British American Tobacco, UgandaBill.Shs Billion ShillingsBOP Balance of PaymentsCAA Civil Aviation AuthorityCBR Crude Birth RateCDO Cotton Development OrganisationCDR Crude Death RateCG Central GovernmentCFR Central Forest ReserveCOMESA Common Market for Eastern and Southern AfricaCPI Consumer Price IndexCSI Construction Sector IndexCY Calendar YearDDA Decentralised District AdministrationDRC Democratic Republic of CongoEAC East African CommunityEEC European Economic CommissionEPS Express Penalty SchemeEU European UnionFY Fiscal YearGDP Gross Domestic ProductGIR Gross Intake RateGO Gross OutputGFS Government Finance StatisticsGWh Giga Watt hoursH/C Health CentreHFO Heavy Fuel OilHSSP Health Sector Strategic PlanIoP Index of ProductionIC Intermediate ConsumptionIHS Integrated Household SurveyIPT Intermittent Presumptive TreatmentISCO International Standard Classification of OccupationISIC International Standard Industrial ClassificationKCC Kampala City CouncilKWh Kilo Watt hoursLFR Local Forest ReserveLPG Liquefied Petroleum GasMAAIF Ministry of Agriculture, Animal Industry and FisheriesMbps Mega bits per secondMFPED Ministry Finance, Planning and Economic Development i
  4. 4. MGLSD Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social DevelopmentMoES Ministry of Education and SportsMOH Ministry of HealthMill.Shs Million shillingsMm MillimetresMRH Mean Relative HumidityMt Metric tonnesMTN Mobile Telephone NetworkMW Mega Wattsn.a Not Availablenes Not elsewhere statedNSDS National Service Delivery SurveyNUSAF Northern Uganda Social Action FundOPI Occupational Permits IssuedPPI Producer Price IndexPPI-M Producer Price Index- ManufacturingPS Plans SubmittedRH Relative HumiditySADC Southern African Development CommunitySACU Southern African Customs UnionShs ShillingsSITC Standard Industrial and Trade ClassificationSq.Kms Square KilometresTFR Total Fertility RateTT TetanusUA Urban AuthoritiesUBI Uganda Business InquiryUBOS Uganda Bureau of StatisticsUCDA Uganda Coffee Development AuthorityUDHS Uganda Demographic and Health SurveyUEDCL Uganda Electricity Distribution Company LimitedUETCL Uganda Electricity Transmission Company LimitedUHSBS Uganda HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioural SurveyUNDP United Nations Development ProgrammeUNEPI Uganda National Expanded Programme on ImmunisationUNHS Uganda National Household SurveyUPE Universal Primary EducationURA Uganda Revenue AuthorityUSE Universal Secondary EducationUTA Uganda Tea AuthorityUTL Uganda Telecommunications LimitedVA Value AddedCommon Symbol“-“ Not Applicable/Nil ii
  5. 5. EXECUTIVE SUMMARYThe Statistical Abstract is an annual publication from Uganda Bureau of Statistics.The abstract gives a statistical summary of socio – economic data for Uganda. Somefigures in this edition may be different from those in the earlier editions due to regularupdates. Note that most of the 2008 data presented in this edition is provisional.The publication is divided into four major chapters which are preceded by a glossaryof definitions and general information on Uganda. It ends with a set of sequentiallyarranged appendix tables for the readers’ information. All the tables in the StatisticalAppendix are serialised using a combination of numbers and alphabets like Table1.1A, Table 2.3 B and so on. The reader should refer to the tables while reading thetext.The number of districts has been increasing due to sub-divisions of some districts.This issue has population data for the 80 districts as of June 2008. Some district datatables however still show data for the original 56 districts, while others show data forthe onetime 76 districts.Chapter one (1) presents Environmental statistics covering land, climate, forestryand rural water supply with the following high lights:Land • Area of Uganda is about 241,550.7 sq. km. • Land area is 199,807.4 sq. km. • Open water and swamps cover about 41,743.2 sq. km.Rainfall • The rainfall trend during 2008 was in line with the long term average for most centres. • Kampala and Jinja recorded rainfall below the long term average after May 2008. • Mbarara recorded a very sharp increase in rainfall between July and September 2008.Humidity • Monthly mean relative humidity at 06.00 and 12.00 hours for 2008 was in line with the long term average for most of the selected centres.Temperature • Maximum and minimum temperatures for all selected centers showed similar patterns with the long term average in 2008.Rural water supply • The largest source of water for the rural population is spring water followed by boreholes. iii
  6. 6. Forestry • Total nominal value for household consumption of firewood and charcoal increased by 81.6 percent from Shs. 18.0 bill to Shs. 32.7 bill. between 1996/97 and 2005/06.Chapter two (2) covers Socio-economic statistics which include Population,Education, Labour Force, Employment and Earning, Income and Expenditure,Prices, Public Health and Crime. Below are the highlights of the Chapter:Population statistics • According to the 2002 census: o 2002 Population was 24.2 million persons. o Annual Population growth rate between 1991 and 2002 censuses was 3.2 percent. o 2002 population density was 123 persons /Sq.Km. o 49 percent of the population was below 15 years. o The overall life expectancy was 50.4 years in 2002. • Total population (2009 mid year projected) is 30.7 million persons. • Total Fertility Rate (UDHS 2006) was 6.7 Births per woman. • Infant Mortality Rate (UDHS 2006) was 75 Per 1,000 Live births.Education • Primary enrollment was 7.4 million in 2008. • The ratios of primary pupils to teachers and pupils to classrooms were 57 and 72 respectively in 2008. • The enrollment of orphans in primary and secondary schools decreased by 4 and 19 percent respectively in 2008. • The secondary school gross enrollment rate was 21 percent in 2008 • Overall literacy rate for 2005/06 was 69 percent among persons aged 10 years and above.Labour force, employment and earnings • Total labour force increased by 11 percent between 2002/03 and 2005/06. • By occupation, 70 percent of the working population was in agriculture. • The average size of civil service increased by 6 percent in 2008. • In real terms, the labour cost index increased by 22 percent in 2008. • Food processing dominated the industry with a 65 percent share of total employment in 2008. • Numbers of employees for selected manufacturing establishments decreased by 2 percent while the wage bill increased by 16 percent in 2008.Income and expenditure • 11 percent increase in monthly Household expenditure was recorded between 2002/03 and 2005/06. • A 10 percent real increase in per capita expenditure was recorded in 2005/06. • 45 percent of the Household expenditure was on food, beverage and tobacco. • Nearly 8.4 million Ugandans lived in poverty in 2005/06. • The proportion of the poor population reduced from 39 percent in 2002/03 to 31 percent in 2005/06. iv
  7. 7. • Nationally, on average, income inequality decreased from 0.428 in 2002/03 to 0.408 in 2005/06.Consumer Prices • High food prices were registered in 2008 resulting to inflation rate of 15.8 percent. • Energy, fuel and utilities’ prices increased by 9.1 percent during 2008. • The annual headline inflation rate for 2008 doubled to 12 percent from 6.1 percent recorded in 2007.Health • Immunization coverage declined over the period 2004 to 2008 for all types of vaccines. • Malaria has remained the leading killer disease over the period 2006-2008. • Latrine coverage at national level improved from 58 percent in 2006 to 63 percent in 2008. • HIV prevalence was reportedly higher among women in the age group 15 – 49 years, at 7.5 percent, compared to their male counterparts in the same age bracket, at 5.0 percent.Crime • The number of cases reported to Police increased by 21 percent in 2008. • Between 2006 and 2008, there was a significant 42 percent decrease in the number of road accidents. • In 2008, serious crimes reported decreased by 17 percent. • There was an 18 percent reduction in the offences reported under the Express Penalty Scheme.Chapter three (3) presents statistics on production, which include Business,Agriculture and Fisheries, Industry, Producer Prices, Energy, Building andConstruction, Transport and Communications, Tourism and Migration. Below are thehighlights of the Chapter:Turnover • Total registered turnover in the business sector was Shs. 4,506 trillion in 2008.Agriculture • Share of agriculture, forestry and fishing to total GDP at current prices is 23.7 percent in 2008/09. • Both beef and milk production increased by 8.0 percent in 2008. • Coffee procured increased by 20.8 percent in 2008. • Banana production increased by 1.5 percent in 2008. v
  8. 8. Industry • Metal production significantly increased by 20.4 percent in 2008 while textiles, clothing and footwear decreased by 19.3 percent.Producer prices • PPI-M (Combined) recorded the highest increase of 21.2 percent in 2008 due to increased prices in all industry groups. • Significant price changes were registered in chemicals, paint, soaps and foam products and metal products.Energy • Trend of petrol sales increased by approximately 31.0 percent in 2008 • Sales of diesel and LPG increased by 10.8 and 13.7 percent respectively in 2008. • Electricity power generation increased by 14.2 percent in 2008. • Electricity units sold in Uganda increased by 30 percent in 2008.Building and construction • Overall, prices in the construction sector rose by 15.2 percent in 2008. • Prices of inputs for both residential and non-residential construction rose by an average of 14.0 percent in 2008. • Domestic cement consumption decreased by 3.3 percent in 2008.Transport and communications • Newly registered vehicles increased by 31.0 percent in 2008. • The volume of cargo handled at Entebbe airport declined by approximately 7.0 percent in 2008. • Total international bandwidth increased by 47.5 percent in 2008. • The volume of both ordinary and registered letters handled by Posta (U) Ltd decreased by 11.0 percent in 2008. • Total number of cellular phone subscribers increased by 65.7 percent in 2008.Tourism and Migration • Generally, tourism contributed 3.7 percent to GDP in 2008. • Total arrivals and departures increased by 32 and 30 percent respectively in 2008. • Tourist arrivals through Entebbe Airport increased by 52 percent in 2008. • National park visitors increased by 9 percent in 2008.Chapter four (4) presents, statistics on Money Related Issues including NationalAccounts, External Trade, Public Finance, Banking and Currency and Insurance.Below are the highlights of the Chapter:National Accounts • GDP annual growth rate for 2008/09 was 7.0 percent. • The GDP per capita annual growth rate for 2008/09 was 3.6 percent. • Private consumption expenditure share of GDP increased to 80.3 percent in 2008/09. • Between 2007/08 and 2008/09 the following sectors registered the indicated growth rates; o Agriculture: 2.6 percent. vi
  9. 9. o Industry: 3.8 percent. o Services: 9.4 percent.External Trade • Trade balance worsened during 2008. • COMESA and the European Union regional blocs were the main destinations for Uganda’s exports in 2008. • The Asian continent remained the main source of Uganda’s imports recording US $ 1,574 mill. in 2008. • Uganda’s informal export earnings increased to US $ 1.3 bill. in 2008. • Sudan was the main final destination for Uganda’s informal exports in 2008.Government Finance • Tax revenue had the largest share of 81.2 percent of total revenue in 2008. • Recurrent expenditure increased to Shs.2,070 bill. in 2007/08 from Shs.1, 820 bill in 2006/07. • The education sector expenditure remained the largest in Local Government recurrent expenditure in 2007/08.Banking and currency • Net foreign assets increased by 33 percent in 2008. • Currency in circulation increased to 1,074 bill. in 2008. • Commercial banks lending rates increased by 0.8 percent. • Commercial banks assets increased by 39.1percent. • Uganda currency deposits in commercial banks increased by 31.6 percent in 2008. • Trade & Commerce sector still takes the largest share of commercial banks’ loans.Insurance • Life insurance policies issued increased by 23.1 percent in 2007. • Life insurance gross premium income increased by 93 percent in 2007. • Insurance companies’ claims paid and outstanding for non life category increased by 25.8 percent in 2007. • Life insurance paid and outstanding claims registered an increase of 79.2 percent in 2007. vii
  10. 10. GLOSSARYAgriculture This term is used to describe crops, livestock, and poultry and fishing activities.Assets Assets are the property of a business. They may be classified as: Current assets; consisting of cash, stock and book debts; Fixed assets; consisting of buildings, plant and machinery; and intangible assets being the value of goodwill or patents.Aviation fuel This is more purified kerosene fuel used in aviation gas-turbine engines.Base period The reference period, to which a series of index numbers relate, this is usually expressed as 100.BCG This is a vaccine against Tuberculosis(Bacillus Camete Guerin)Bio mass – energy This is energy that is obtained from fuel wood, charcoal and crop residues.Broad money – (M2) This consists of currency in circulation, demand, time and savings deposits. The deposits are held by the private sector and exclude those held by the central government.Broad money - (M2) A This is equivalent to (M2) plus certificates of deposit.Broad money - (M3) This is equivalent to (M2) A plus foreign currency deposits.Crime An offence for which one may be punished by lawDiesel fuel This is fuel used for internal combustion in diesel engines and as a burner fuel in heating installations such as furnaces. Another name for this product is automotive gasoil.DMBs It stands for Deposit Money Banks. It refers to commercial banks in our institutional settings.DPT This is a vaccine against three diseases namely: Diphtheria, Pertusis (whooping cough) and Tetanus.Economic activity Covers all market production and certain types of non-market production, including production and processing of primary products for own consumption, own-account construction (owner occupied dwellings) and other production of fixed assets for own use.Employment This includes all wage and salary earners and managers in all businesses, and directors actively working in incorporated businesses. It includes those working full-time or part-time and those who are permanent or temporary.Employed Persons Persons in paid employment who work for wage or salary in cash or in kind or both and have a formal job attachment.Employment status Refers to the status of an economically active person with respect to his/her position at his/her place of work and his/her mode of remuneration.Enterprise This is a single legal entity or a combination of legal entities. It may also be a sole legal unit carrying out one or more activities at one or more locations. It may also be several establishments.Establishment This is an economic unit engaged in one or predominantly one viii
  11. 11. kind of economic activity under single ownership or control and is situated at a single physical location.Exports Outward flows comprising goods leaving the economic territory of a country to the rest of the world.Foreign reserves They consist of those external assets available to and controlled by central banks for direct financing of balance of payments imbalances, for indirectly regulating the magnitude of such imbalances through intervention in exchange markets to affect the currency exchange rate, and/or for other purposes. Included are monetary gold, Special Drawing Rights (SDRs), reserve position in the fund, foreign exchange assets (consisting of currency, deposits and securities) and other claims.Heavy Fuel Oil This is residual fuel obtained after refinery of petroleum products. It is used in ships and industrial large-scale heating installations as a fuel in furnaces or boilers.Gross Domestic Product The value of goods and services produced within the economic territory of the country.Gross Enrolment Rate The ratio of pupils in primary school (regardless of age) to the country total population aged 6-12 years.Gross Intake Rate The ratio of the pupils enrolled in primary one regardless of age to the country total population aged six years.Gross Output The production value as compiled from total receipts from industrial and non industrial goods and services in an economy, adjusted for stock changes but excluding Excise Duty and Indirect Taxes. This is Gross Output at factor cost.Health Centre II Out-patient clinics treating common diseases and offering antenatal care. According to the Ugandan governments health policy, every parish is supposed to have a Health Centre II.Health Centre III Health centres with facilities which include an operation room and a section for minor surgery headed by a clinical officer. Every county should have this facility.Health Centre IV The Health Centre IV is a mini hospital with the kind of services found at Health Centre III. It serves a county or a parliamentary constituency.Imports Inward flows of goods from the rest of the world into the economic territory of a country.Index Number A number that shows relative change in price or volume between the base period and another period.Industry This is an economic activity undertaken by a business establishment as specified in the ISICIntermediate Consumption This is the value of goods and services that are used in the process of production of other goods and services rather than final consumptionKerosene This is fuel used as an illuminant for lighting and in some cases for cooking.Large Business Business establishment employing 100 or more personsLabour force Currently active population aged 14 to 64 years who were “employed” or “unemployed” during the last 7 days ix
  12. 12. Labour force participation Ratio of all economically active persons aged 14-64years to therate total number of persons aged 14-64 yearsLiquid Petroleum Gas Liquid Petroleum Gases (LPG’s) are hydrocarbons, which are gaseous under conditions of normal temperature and pressure but are liquefied by compression or cooling to facilitate storage, handling and transportation.Loan A loan may be money or securities supplied by one party (the lender) to a second party (the borrower) in a transaction in return for a promised future payment by the borrower. Such transactions normally include the payment of interest due to the lender as per agreed repayment schedules between the two parties.Net Enrolment Rate The ratio of pupils in primary school aged 6 – 12 to the country total population aged 6 -12 years.Net Intake Rate The ratio of the pupils aged six in primary one to the country total population aged 6 years.Non-traditional exports Refers to commodities other than traditional exports that have recently featured in Uganda’s export trade.Occupation Refers to the nature of task and duties performed during the reference period preceding the interview by persons in paid employment, unpaid family work or self-employment jobs.Overdraft A type of a short-term loan particularly used to supply short-term working capital to tide over the production cycle or finance for seasonal requirements.Passengers Travellers in a car, bus, train, plane or ship who are not driving or part of the crew. These also include those embarked and disembarked.Petrol This is a light hydrocarbon fuel used in positive ignition engines. Another name used for this type of fuel is premium motor spirit.Prison Place where people are kept as a punishment for crimes they have committed or while awaiting trial.Prisoner A person kept in prison as a punishment for a crime or while waiting for trial.Proportional morbidity ratio This is the proportion attributable to a given cause of illness. It is a proxy for the prevalence of sickness in a population.Residents Persons whose usual residence is Uganda including those whose nationality is not Ugandan.Retained Reserves This is the increase in value of a currency or the increase in value of fixed assets consisting mainly of freehold land and buildings.Revaluation reserves These kinds of reserves arise due to the revaluation of fixed assets but cannot be paid out as dividends because they are not realised profits. They merely restate the value of an asset.Teaching Service Teaching Service comprises of teachers of primary schools, secondary and technical schools, commercial and technical colleges and institutions.Traditional Civil Servants These are employees of line ministries and self accounting government departments.Trade Balance This is the difference in value between the country’s visible imports and exports. x
  13. 13. Traditional Exports Refers to long-term export cash crops introduced to Uganda long time ago. That is Coffee, Cotton, Tea and Tobacco.Treasury Bill These are short-term bearer securities with maturities of 91 days, 182 days, 273 days or 364 days issued by Bank of Uganda.Underemployment Refers to persons who work less than 40 hours per week, but were willing and available to work additional hours within the 7 last seven days.Value Added The value of outcome when factors of production interact to avail goods and services. Value added technically is the difference between the value of gross output and the value of intermediate inputs and comprises the following: (a) Compensation of employees (b) Consumption of fixed capital (depreciation) (c) Licenses (d) Rent (e) Interest (f) Operating surplus (usually) net profit or loss and other small itemsVAT Tax levied on goods and services consumed within a country.Wage Bill All cash payments made by employers in return for labour provided by the employees. The payments include salaries and wages, overtime, holiday pay, bonuses, commissions, sick leave and any other allowances paid in cash to the employees. xi
  14. 14. GENERAL INFORMATION ON UGANDAGeographical IndicatorsLatitude 4o12’N & 1o29’SLongitude 29o34’E & 35o0’WAltitude (minimum ASL) 620 metres (maximum ASL) 5,110 metresTotal surface area 241,550.7 km2Area under land 199,807 km2Area under water and swamps 41,743 km2Temperature 15-31oCRainfall 735 -1863 mm/year2008 Economic IndicatorsGDP at current market prices 28,340 billion ShsPer capita GDP at current market prices 956,081 ShsGDP growth rate at constant (2002) market prices 8.3 percentPer capita GDP growth rate at constant (2002) market prices 4.9 percentContribution of agriculture to GDP at current market prices 21.5 percentBalance of payments surplus 29.0 million US$Inflation rate 12.1 percentBudget deficit as a percentage of GDP (2008/09) 7.2 percentDemographic and socio-economic indicatorsTotal population (2009 mid-year)* 30.7 millionPercentage urban (2009 mid-year)* 14.8 percentPopulation of Kampala district (2009 mid-year)* 1.53 millionSex ratio of total population (2002 census) 95 males per 100 femalesPopulation density (2002 census) 123 persons/km2Infant Mortality rate (2002 census)* 76 per 1000 live birthsLife Expectancy at birth (2002 census)* 50.4 years Male 48.8 years Female 52.0 yearsPupil Teacher ratio (Primary 2008) 57Pupil Classroom ratio (Primary 2008) 72Student Teacher ratio (Secondary 2008) 21Student Classroom ratio (Secondary 2008) 36Note: * Demographic estimates were based on the Census 2002 final results.Only population of gazetted city, municipalities and towns was considered as urban population. xii
  15. 15. MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS, UGANDA COUNTRY PROFILE Goal/Indicator Progress Target 2000 2003 2005/06 2015 Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger1 Poverty head count (P0) 33.8 37.7 31.1 28.02 Poverty gap - (P1) 10.0 11.3 8.73 Underweight moderate and severe 22.8 20.4 12.5 Goal 2: Achieve universal primary education4 Net enrolment ratio in primary education 84.0 90.0 84.0 100.05 Literacy rate of 15-24 year-olds 78.8 80 84.0 Goal 3: Promote gender equality and empower women6 Ratio of girls to boys in primary education 0.99 0.99 0.96 1.07 Ratio of girls to boys in secondary education 0.79 0.82 1.08 Ratio of girls to boys in tertiary education 0.55 1.09 Ratio of literate women to men 15 -24 years. 0.84 0.9 0.92 1.010 Proportion of seats held by women in parliament 19.0 25.0 50.011 Share of women in wage employment in the non-agricultural sector 39.2 28.2 50.0 Goal 4: Reduce child mortality12 Under – five mortality (per 100,00 live births) 152 137 5613 Infant mortality rate 88.4 76.0 31.014 Proportion of 1 year old children immunized against measles 56.8 68.1 90.0 Goal 5: Improve maternal health15 Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births) 505 435 13116 Proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel 39.0 41.1 90.0 Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases17 HIV/AIDS orphans (thousands) 884.018 HIV/AIDS prevalence among 15-24 year pregnant women 4.9*19 Condom use at last higher-risk sex among 15-24 year olds 49.8 55.1 52.9 Male 65.3* Female 27.1*20 Contraceptive prevalence rate among women 15-49 years 23.0 64.5 23.6 Proportion of 15-24 year olds who have comprehensive knowledge of21 28.0 32.1 HIV/AIDS Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability22 Proportion of land area covered by forest 21.3 18.323 Proportion of population with access to improved water source (urban) 87.0 84.0 100.024 Proportion of population with access to improved water source (rural) 57.0 53.5 58.5 62.025 Proportion of population with access to improved sanitation 82.0 87.0 Goal 8: Develop a global partnership for development26 Unemployment rate of 15-24 year olds 6.3 3.427 Debt relief committed under the HIPC initiative $69.7M $86.6M28 Debt service as a percentage of exports of goods and services 20.4 15.8Note: More indicators exist but are not listed above because of absence of data*- The figure is for 2002 Figures in blue are from the HIV/AIDS Sero-Behavioural Survey, 2004-05 Figures in red are from the UDHS 2005/06Source: Indicator; 1,2,4,6,7,8,9,11,23,24,25, 26 –UNHS, Uganda Bureau of Statistics 3,5,12,13,14,15,16,18,19,20 - UDHS, Uganda Bureau of Statistics 27, 28-Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development 10-Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development 22- Uganda Forestry Authority 19- 2006 UDHS, Uganda Bureau of Statistics xiii
  16. 16. xiv
  17. 17. Table of contentsFOREWORD........................................................................................................................................ 2LIST OF ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................ iEXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..................................................................................................................... iiiGLOSSARY ....................................................................................................................................... viiiGENERAL INFORMATION ON UGANDA .......................................................................................... xiiMILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS, UGANDA COUNTRY PROFILE ........................................ xiii1 Environment Statistics ................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 Land ................................................................................................................................... 1 1.2 Rainfall ............................................................................................................................... 2 1.3 Temperature ....................................................................................................................... 3 1.4 Humidity.............................................................................................................................. 4 1.5 Rural Water Supply............................................................................................................. 4 1.6 Forestry .............................................................................................................................. 5 1.6.1 Local and Central Forest Reserves ............................................................................ 5 1.6.3 Wood production ........................................................................................................ 5 1.6.4 Consumption of charcoal and firewood....................................................................... 62 Demographic Statistics ................................................................................................................ 7 2.1 Population........................................................................................................................... 7 2.1.1 Fertility ........................................................................................................................ 7 2.1.2 Mortality ...................................................................................................................... 8 2.1.3 Life Expectancy .......................................................................................................... 9 2.2 Education.......................................................................................................................... 10 2.2.1 Primary School Education ........................................................................................ 10 2.2.2 Secondary School Education.................................................................................... 12 2.2.3 Higher Education Institutions .................................................................................... 14 2.2.4 Literacy ..................................................................................................................... 15 2.3 Labour Force, Employment and Earnings ......................................................................... 16 2.3.1 Key Labour Market Indicators ................................................................................... 16 2.3.2 Demand for labour .................................................................................................... 17 2.3.3 The Civil Service....................................................................................................... 18 2.3.4 Employment and annual wage bill for selected manufacturing establishments ......... 18 2.3.5 The Labour Cost Index ............................................................................................. 19 2.3.6 Employment and earnings survey ............................................................................ 20 2.4 Income, expenditure and poverty rates ............................................................................. 22 2.4.1 Consumption expenditure per household ................................................................. 22 2.4.2 Real Consumption Expenditure Per Capita .............................................................. 22 2.4.3 Share of Household Expenditure by Item Group ...................................................... 23 2.4.4 Poverty Trend Estimates .......................................................................................... 24 2.4.5 Inequality in Household Consumption ...................................................................... 25 2.4.6 Summary of Findings................................................................................................ 26 2.5 Prices ............................................................................................................................... 27 2.5.1 The Headline Consumer Price Index ........................................................................ 27 xv
  18. 18. 2.5.2 The Core Index ......................................................................................................... 27 2.5.3 Food-crops Index...................................................................................................... 27 2.5.4 The Energy, Fuel and Utilities (EFU Index) .............................................................. 27 2.5.5 Major Inflation Drivers over the past two years (2007- 2008) .................................... 27 2.6 Health ............................................................................................................................... 29 2.6.1 Health Units .............................................................................................................. 29 2.6.2 Immunisation Coverage ............................................................................................ 29 2.6.3 Morbidity ................................................................................................................... 29 2.6.4 Health Sector performance indicators....................................................................... 30 2.7 Crime ................................................................................................................................ 32 2.7.1 Police cases ............................................................................................................. 323 Production Statistics .................................................................................................................. 38 3.1 Turnover ........................................................................................................................... 38 3.1.1 Number of businesses with turnover by sector ......................................................... 38 3.1.2 Turnover in Businesses ............................................................................................ 39 3.2 Agriculture and fisheries ................................................................................................... 40 3.2.1 Cash crops ............................................................................................................... 40 3.2.2 Food crops ............................................................................................................... 40 3.2.3 Fish catch by water body .......................................................................................... 40 3.2.4 Livestock .................................................................................................................. 40 3.2.5 Production of Livestock products (2005-2008).......................................................... 41 3.3 Industry ............................................................................................................................. 43 3.3.1 Index of Production................................................................................................... 43 3.4 Producer Price Index ........................................................................................................ 45 3.4.1 PPI-M (Combined) Annual Changes......................................................................... 45 3.5 Energy .............................................................................................................................. 47 3.5.1 Petroleum products sales ......................................................................................... 47 3.5.3 Petroleum products imports ...................................................................................... 47 3.5.4 Electricity .................................................................................................................. 48 3.5.5 Lake Victoria Levels ................................................................................................. 49 3.5.6 Number of electricity consumers by type, 2004-2008 ............................................... 50 3.5.7 Electricity tariffs ........................................................................................................ 51 3.6 Building and Construction ................................................................................................. 52 3.6.1 Construction ............................................................................................................. 52 3.6.2 Cement Consumption ............................................................................................... 53 3.6.3 Building Statistics ..................................................................................................... 53 3.7 Transport and Communication .......................................................................................... 56 3.7.1 Transport .................................................................................................................. 56 3.7.2 Communication ........................................................................................................ 57 3.8 Migrations and Tourism .................................................................................................... 59 3.8.1 Total arrivals ............................................................................................................. 59 xvi
  19. 19. 3.8.2 Departures from 2004 - 2008.................................................................................... 59 3.8.3 Tourist arrivals in Uganda ......................................................................................... 60 3.8.4 National Parks ......................................................................................................... 61 3.8.5 Net Migration ............................................................................................................ 62 3.8.6 Accommodation Statistics......................................................................................... 624 Macroeconomic Statistics .......................................................................................................... 63 4.1 National accounts ............................................................................................................. 63 4.1.1 Gross Domestic Product ........................................................................................... 63 4.1.2 Agriculture, forestry and fishing ................................................................................ 63 4.1.3 Industry .................................................................................................................... 64 4.1.4 Services.................................................................................................................... 65 4.1.5 Expenditure on Gross Domestic Product .................................................................. 67 4.1.6 GDP by expenditure at 1 digit level basic heading .................................................... 67 4.1.7 Balance of payments ................................................................................................ 68 4.2 External Trade .................................................................................................................. 69 4.2.1 Trade balance .......................................................................................................... 69 4.2.2 Exports ..................................................................................................................... 70 4.2.3 Imports ..................................................................................................................... 71 4.2.4 The Informal Cross Border Trade Survey (ICBT)...................................................... 72 4.3 Government Finance Statistics ......................................................................................... 76 4.3.1 Introduction............................................................................................................... 76 4.3.2 Coverage .................................................................................................................. 76 4.3.3 Government revenue, 2007/08 ................................................................................. 76 4.3.4 Central Government recurrent expenditure, 2006/07 and 2007/08 ........................... 76 4.3.4 Local Government recurrent expenditure, 2007/08 ................................................... 76 4.4 Banking and currency ....................................................................................................... 77 4.4.1 Monetary Survey.......................................................................................................... 77 4.4.2 Structure of interest rates............................................................................................. 77 4.4.3 Commercial banks’ assets and liabilities ...................................................................... 77 4.4.4 Commercial banks’ outstanding loans and advances .................................................. 77 4.4.5 Annual foreign exchange rates and volumes ............................................................... 78 4.5 Insurance .......................................................................................................................... 79 4.5.1 Policies issued .......................................................................................................... 79 4.5.2 Insurance companies’ income and expenditure ........................................................ 79 4.5.3 Insurance companies’ paid and outstanding claims by class .................................... 80 xvii
  20. 20. 1 Environment StatisticsThis section presents statistics on land, climate and rural water supply.1.1 LandUganda has an area of 241,550.7 square kilometres (sq. km) of which 41,743.2 sq km are open water andswamps, and 199,807.4 sq km is land. The altitude above sea level ranges from 620 metres (Albert Nile)to 5,111 metres (Mt. Rwenzori peak). Uganda is located within the Great Lakes region of East andCentral Africa. It shares Lake Victoria with Kenya and Tanzania and Lakes Albert and Edward withthe Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Within its boundaries are lakes Wamala, Bunyonyi, Katwe,Nakivale, Mburo, Kyoga, George and Bisina.The three major rivers in Uganda are Aswa, Kagera and the Nile. There are many other smaller rivers andstreams which drain into wetlands and then lakes or form tributaries and sub-tributaries to the major rivers.The vegetation is mainly composed of savannah grassland, woodland, bush land and tropical highforest.Table 1.1 below shows the national land cover in sq. km. by type. The cultivated land cover being thelargest increased from 84,010 sq. km. in 1990 to 99,018.4 sq. km. in 2005. The second in size are thegrasslands. Those remained constant at 51,152.7 sq km for the same periods. Notably, the bush landsand woodlands decreased from 14,223.9 sq. km. and 39,740.9 sq. km. in 1990 to 11,893.6 and 29,528.1sq. km. in 2005 respectively. Similarly, plantations (hard and soft woods), tropical high forest (depletedand normal) have decreased over the period.Table 1.1: National Land cover statistics (sq km) 1990 2000 2005Built-Up Areas 365.7 365.7 365.7Bushlands 14,223.9 12,624.5 11,893.6Commercial Farmlands 684.5 684.5 684.5Cultivated Lands 84,010.0 94,526.7 99,018.4Grasslands 51,152.7 51,152.7 51,152.7Impediments 37.1 37.1 37.1Plantations - Hardwoods 186.8 153.3 138.8Plantations - Softwoods 163.8 80.0 192.0Tropical High Forest 2,740.6 2,248.2 2,036.3Tropical High Forest Normal 6,501.5 5,333.5 4,830.7Water Bodies 36,902.8 36,902.8 36,902.8Wetlands 4,840.4 4,840.4 4,840.4Woodlands 39,740.9 32,601.4 29,528.1Total 241,550.7 241,550.7 241,550.7Note: The figures indicated in the above table are based on projections. Actual vegetation studies were undertaken in 1994 based on1992 satellite imagery.Source: National Forestry Authority 1
  21. 21. 1.2 RainfallFigure 1.2.1 below shows Long Term Average and Monthly rainfall trends for the year2008 for the selected centres, that is, Gulu, Kampala, Jinja and Mbarara.In the 1st and 2nd quarter of 2008 rainfall was generally below the long term averagetrend while in the 3rd quarter rainfall was above the long term average trend. In the 4thquarter however the rainfall figures for Gulu fell slightly below the long term average trend. In 2008,the lowest rainfall was recorded in February.For Kampala centre, during the 1st half of 2008 the rainfall level was higher for some months thanthe long term average. However, the long term average was higher than the rainfall received in the2nd half of 2008. There was a drop in the December 2008 rainfall as compared to rainfall of theprevious month of November 2008.In Jinja, most months showed minimal differences between the long term average and 2008 rainfalltrends, except for September 2008 which recorded 90 mm of the long term average trendcompared to 13 mm of the rainfall of the same month. It can also be observed that both the longterm average and 2008 rainfall have generally similar movements.The rainfall movements for Mbarara for 2008 were similar to that of the long term average for mostof the months, although the 2008 rainfall was generally higher than the long term average rainfallfor the most months. The highest difference between the long term average (147.7 mm) and the2008 rainfall was recorded in September (298.5 mm). (See Statistical Appendix Table 1.2 A)Figure 1.2.1: Rainfall in selected centres, 2008Monthly Rainfall Gulu in millimeters 2
  22. 22. Monthly Rainfall Kampala in millimetersMonthly Rainfall Jinja in millimetersMonthly Rainfall Mbarara in millimeters1.3 TemperatureFor all the selected centres, mean, maximum and minimum temperature trends showedsimilar patterns to that of the long term average. However, temperature for Arua, Gulu, Kampala,Lira, Masindi and Tororo was slightly higher than the long term average. (See Statistical AppendixTable 1.3A). 3
  23. 23. 1.4 HumidityMonthly mean relative humidity at 06.00 and 12.00 hours was generally in line with the long termaverage for all the selected centres (Gulu, Jinja, Kampala and Mbarara), except for Mbararawhere the patterns differ.1.5 Rural Water SupplyThe Directorate of Water Development has the responsibility of supplying water to the ruralpopulation. Table 1.5.1 shows that above 50 percent of the rural population is served withwater although there was a slight decline of 2.3 percent in 2006 compared to 2005.Table 1.5.1: Rural water supply by source, 2003-2006 (Type and number of sources)Source 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006Spring 20,224 21,477 22,869 23,696 23,327Borehole 17,846 18,873 19,001 19,717 19,054Shallow Well 5,998 7,432 8,721 9,872 8,420Gravity Flow System 138 183 238 257 naGravity Flow System (Taps) 4,233 4,803 5,768 6,182 7,765Rural Population % coverage 51.2 53.5 56.9 60.8 58.5Source: Directorate of Water Development 4
  24. 24. 1.6 ForestryThis section presents statistics on forestry which include area on Local and Central ForestReserves, production of forestry products and values of the output for the period 2003 to 2007.Forestry products are of extremely high economic importance to Uganda due to their household,small and medium scale industrial uses. The energy sector is characterised by heavy dependenceon bio-mass resources which provide more than 90 percent of the national total energy needs. Bio-mass is the dominant energy resource for households, small and medium scale industries such aslime, brick and tile making and a number of agro-based industries.1.6.1 Local and Central Forest ReservesIn Table 1.6.1, the area in hectares under forests for both the Central Forest Reserve(CFR) and Local Forest Reserve (LFR) was determined under the National Bio-mass Study(1995). In all the regions, the proportion of land under Central Forest Reserves (CFR) was higherthan the Local Forest Reserves. Of the four regions, Eastern had the largest proportion (2.6percent) under Local Forest Reserves, followed by Central (0.5 percent), Northern (0.3 percent)and Western (0.1 percent). For more information on Local and Central Forest Reserves seeTable 1.6 A in the Statistical Appendix.Table 1.6.1: Share of total area under forests by region, 1995 CFR Percent of LFR Percent of Total Forest Reserve Region CFR (1) Hectares Total LFR (2) Hectares Total AreaCentral 303,358 99.5 1,576 0.5 304,934Eastern 56,479 97.4 1,531 2.6 58,010Northern 556,825 99.7 1,447 0.3 558,272Western 356,037 99.9 431 0.1 356,468Uganda 1,272,699 99.6 4,985 0.4 1,277,684Note: (1) CFR – Central Forest Reserve (2) LFR – Local Forest ReserveSource: National Forestry Authority.1.6.3 Wood productionUganda has been registering a steady increase in the total wood production over the last five yearsand this trend is likely to continue into the future. The booming construction industry andinadequate supply of the alternative sources of fuel has pushed up the demand for woodconsumption in commercial, industrial and other use sectors which in 2007 surpassed woodused as fuel by households as shown in Table 1.6.2 below.Table 1.6.2: Wood fuel and other wood uses by percentage of total, 2003 - 2007Category 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007Wood used as fuel by Households 60.8 60.5 60.2 59.8 45.0Wood for other uses 39.2 39.5 39.8 40.2 55.0Total 100 100 100 100 100Source: National Forestry Authority 5
  25. 25. 1.6.4 Consumption of charcoal and firewoodTable 1.6.3 shows the value of household expenditure on firewood and charcoal in both monetaryand non-monetary terms as reported in the Household Expenditure Surveys. For a period ofabout 10 years, the total nominal value increased by 81.6 percent, from Shs. 18.0 billion in 1996/97to Shs 32.7 billion in 2005/06. The value of charcoal consumption more than doubled, whilethe value of firewood consumption increased by 67.7 percent for the same period.Table 1.6.3: Household consumption of firewood and charcoal (million Shillings)Item 1996/97 2002/03 2005/06Charcoal 4,076 6,936 9,345Firewood 13,967 20,677 23,425Total 18,043 27,613 32,770Source: Uganda Bureau of Statistics 6
  26. 26. 2 Demographic Statistics2.1 PopulationUganda’s population has continued to grow over a period of time from 9.5 millions in 1969 to 24.2millions in 2002. Population increased at an average annual growth rate of 3.2 percent between1991 and 2002. The projected 2009 mid-year population stands at 30.7 millions as shown in figure2.1.1. More than half of Uganda’s population (51 percent) are females. The general population isincreasingly becoming younger with a proportion of the children (under 18 years) having increasedfrom 51 percent in 1969 to 56 percent in 2002. The proportion of the elderly persons (60 years andabove) on the other hand decreased from 5.9 percent in 1969 to 4.6 percent in 2002.Figure 2.1.1: Census population, 1969, 1980, 1991 and 2002 and mid year (2009) projection 35 30.7 30 24.2 25 20 Million 16.7 15 12.6 9.5 10 5 0 1969 1980 1991 2002 2009 Year2.1.1 FertilityThe fertility levels have remained high over the past 3 decades, with the Total Fertility Rate (TFR)of about 7 children per woman. According to the 2006 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey,the TFR has slightly reduced to 6.7 children per woman. The TFR is higher in the rural compared tothe urban areas. Figure 2.1.2 below shows the trend of TFR over the period 1991 to 2006. 7
  27. 27. Figure 2.1.2: Fertility Trends, 1991- 2006 7.2 7.1 7.1 7.0 Births per 1000 6.9 6.9 6.9 6.9 6.8 6.7 6.7 6.6 6.5 1991* 1995 2000 2002* 2006 YearNote: 1991 and 2002 data is from population and housing censuses while data for 1995, 2000 and 2006 is from UDHS2.1.2 MortalityThere has been a general improvement in mortality levels. The infant mortality rate declined from122 to 75 deaths per 1,000 live births between 1991 and 2006 while the under five mortalitydeclined from 203 to 137 deaths per 1,000 live births over the same period. Figure 2.1.3 showsthe trend of IMR and Under Five Mortality over the period 1991 to 2006Figure 2.1.3: Infant and Under Five Mortality Trends, 1991- 2006 250 203 200 162 152 156 Deaths per 1000 150 137 122 97 100 89 87 76 50 0 1991* 1995 2000 2002* 2006 Year Infant Under FiveNote: 1991 and 2002 data is from population and housing censuses while data for 1995, 2000 and 2006 is from UDHS 8
  28. 28. 2.1.3 Life ExpectancyLife expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years a person is expected to liveif a particular pattern of mortality is maintained. Table 2.1.1 shows that the over-all life expectancyat birth from 2002 Census was 50.4 years for both sexes. Males registered a lower life expectancyof 48.8 years compared to their female counterparts at 52 years. There was a gain of 2.3 years inlife expectancy between 1991 and 2002 for both sexes.Table 2.1.1: Life Expectancy at Birth by Census Year 1969- 2002Census Year Male Female Total1969 46.0 47.0 46.51991 45.7 50.5 48.12002 48.8 52.0 50.4 9
  29. 29. 2.2 EducationEducation is perhaps the most important component in any country’s development. It empowersthe population with necessary skills, widens their knowledge of the general public and enlightensthem about their wellbeing. Proper and evidence-based planning for Education is vital forimprovement of the sector. The main source of Education statistics are the returns from schools,submitted to Ministry of Education and Sports. However, not all schools submit regularly, and thismay cause some inconsistencies in data published in this Statistical Abstract. The response ratetherefore determines the data available.The statistics presented in this section include total number of education institutions, enrolment inthose institutions, orphans, students with special needs, levels of adult literacy and the number ofpersons in the teaching profession.2.2.1 Primary School EducationThe introduction of the Universal Primary Education (UPE) programme in 1997 has improvedaccess to primary education for a large proportion of the population particularly in the rural areas.The implementation of this programme has caused tremendous changes in primary enrolmentwhich has grew from 3.1 millions in 1996 to 7.4 millions in 2008.Table 2.2.1 indicates that there was a 0.9 percentage decrease in the number of pupils enrolledbetween 2007 and 2008. (Details of enrolment by class and sex can be found in Appendix Table2.2A). Between 2007 and 2008, there was a 3.7 percentage decrease in the number of primaryschools. It is significant that the number of primary teachers reduced by 13.8 percent between2007 and 2008.This was as a result of streamlining the teachers’ ceiling.The pupil-teacher andpupil-class room ratios remained the same at 57 and 72 respectively between 2007 and 2008.(Details are in Appendix 2.2 C).Table 2.2.1: Primary School Education Indicators in Uganda 2003 – 2007Year 2005 2006 2007 2008Enrolment (‘000) 7,224 7,362 7537 7,471Number of Primary Teachers (‘000s) 145 150 152 131Number of Primary Schools 13,576 14,385 14,728 14,179% Annual change in Enrolment -2 1.9 2 -1Pupil Teacher Ratio 50 48 57 57Pupil Classroom Ratio 74 72 72 72GER 107 114 113 108GIR 152.8 129 129 128NER 93 92 93 89NIR 66 56 57 55Source: Planning Unit, Ministry of Education and Sports.The Gross Intake Rate (GIR) in 2007 and 2008 was 129 and 128 respectively. Since the GIR isslightly more than 100, this means that more pupils enrolled in primary school before the age of 6years or lasted beyond 12 years in primary school. Details of the GIR and other primary educationaccessibility indictors are shown in Appendix Table 2.2 B. 10
  30. 30. 2.2.1.1 Primary School OrphansOrphans refer to children who have lost either one or both of their parents. Table 2.2.2 shows thatthe number of orphans enrolled in primary schools reduced from 1.33 to 1.27 million childrenbetween 2007 and 2008, giving a 4 percentage point decrease. Among the orphans enrolled in2008, males had a higher percentage, of 51, compared to the females.On average, a comparison of the percentage of ophans to the total enrolment indicates thatorphans have remained within the same range of about 17 percent since 2004.Table 2.2.2: Primary school orphans by sex (2002 - 2008) Year/Sex 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Male 636,284 641,930 642,088 677,867 644,974 Female 616,294 619,623 628,980 657,062 629,025 Total 1,252,578 1,261,553 1,271,068 1,334,929 1,273,999 % to total enrollment 17 17.5 17.3 17.7 17.1Source: Ministry of Education and Sports2.2.1.2 Primary School Pupils with disabilitiesPrimary school pupils with disabilities decreased by 5.8 percent in 2008 and their percentage tototal enrollment also decreased from 24.3 in 2007 to 23.1 in 2008. Details on number of disabledpupils by class are shown in the table below.Table 2.2.3: Primary school pupils with special needs, 2007- 2008 Class 2007 2008 Male Female Total Male Female Total P1 21,982 17,858 39,840 19,713 15,565 35,278 P2 15,349 13,617 28,966 14,235 12,391 26,626 P3 16,262 14,590 30,852 15,281 13,564 28,845 P4 14,754 13,768 28,522 14,495 13,409 27,904 P5 12,706 11,651 24,357 11,965 11,634 23,599 P6 9,756 3,143 18,899 9,491 9,228 18,719 P7 6,332 5,310 11,642 6,385 5,071 11,456 Total 97,141 85,937 183,078 91,565 80,862 172,427Source: Ministry of Education and Sports.2.2.1.3 Primary school education facilitiesAt the national level, about three in every five pupils enrolled in primary school had adequate sittingspace. Provision of adequate infrastructure for the children enroled in primary school is key andremains a challenge to the Education sector.Table 2.2.4 shows that a lower proportion of pupils inlower classes had adequate space compared to those in upper classes for the period 2007 to2008. Pupils in lower classes are at a disadvantage compared to those in upper classes. 11
  31. 31. Table 2.2.4: Primary school pupils with adequate sitting space by class (2007-2008) Class 2007 2008 Pupils with Pupils with adequate % to total adequate % to total Enrolment space Enrolment Enrolment space Enrolment P1 1,832,129 880,304 48 1,767,399 874,483 49.5 P2 1,213,486 678,050 56 1,234,443 701,644 56.8 P3 1,224,812 774,757 63 1,200,289 777,113 64.7 P4 1,096,256 755,357 69 1,096,760 762,496 69.5 P5 939,804 699,225 74 936,924 697,200 74.4 P6 761,212 606,210 80 749,733 599,742 80.0 P7 470,272 414,068 88 485,726 430,197 88.6 Total 7,537,971 4,807,971 64 7,471,274 4,842,875 64.8Note: Adequate sitting space refers to three pupils per standard deskSource: Ministry of Education and Sport2.2.1.4 Primary School CompletionThe Uganda National Household Survey (UNHS), 2006 collected information on the completionrates to establish the number of pupils who had continous primary education from Primary 1 toPrimary 7. Comparing the number of pupils enrolled to Primary 1 in 2000 and those enroled inPrimary 7 in 2006, Table 2.2.5 shows that one in every three children who started Primary 1 in2000 was likely not to complete Primary 7 in 2006.Table 2.2.5: Primary school completion 2000-2006 (‘000)Currently attending Attending P.1 in 2000 Attending P.7 in 2006Region Male Female Uganda Male Female UgandaKampala 53 39 92 16 15 31Central, Excluding Kampala 251 226 477 80 85 165Eastern 177 187 364 94 74 168Northern 176 203 379 90 47 137Western 251 244 496 98 86 184Uganda 908 899 1,808 378 307 685Source: UNHS, 2006, Uganda Bureau of Statistics2.2.2 Secondary School EducationFollowing the introduction of UPE in 2006, the number of pupils enrolling in secondary school hasbeen on the increase, leading to an increase in the demand for more secondary schools. Table2.2.6.shows that between 2007 and 2008, secondary school enrolment declined by 13 percentwhich, explains the reduction in the student teacher ratio from 39 to 21 over the same period.Detailed breakdown on these indicators are in Appendix Tables 2.2 H and 2.2 I 12
  32. 32. Table 2.2.6: Trend of key secondary school education indicators 2004– 2008 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008Enrolment 697,507 728,393 814,087 954,328 827,504Number of Schools 3,645 1,961 2,286 2,644 1,907Number of Teachers 37,313 37,607 42,673 24,548 40,352Student teacher ratio 19 19 19 39 21Gross Enrolment rate n.a. 18.6 22.1 25.0 21Net Enrolment rate n.a. 15.4 18.6 21.3 17.9Source: Ministry of Education and Sports.2.2.1.5 Education facilities in secondary schoolsAdequate sitting space refers to three students per standard desk. Table 2.2.7 shows that studentswho lacked adequate writing and sitting space were reducing as the classes advanced. However,in 2008, the total number of students without adequate sitting space increased by about 93 percentcountrywide.Table 2.2.7: Secondary school students who lack adequate space Year/Class 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 S.1 30,781 23,927 26,153 33,892 30,566 S.2 22,141 19,461 18,299 12,870 28,787 S.3 17,468 15,400 16,193 10,239 12,446 S.4 11,881 9,501 9,286 4,434 7,262 S.5 6,101 3,453 2,450 847 4,202 S.6 4,430 3,325 278 512 3,014 Total 92,802 51,140 46,506 28,902 55,711Source: Ministry of Education and Sports2.2.1.6 Secondary school students with Special NeedsTable 2.2.8 indicates a reduction in the number of disabled students who enrolled in differentclasses in 2008, right from Senior One to Six. Overall, the number of secondary school studentswith Special Needs declined by 25 percent between 2007 and 2008.Table 2.2.8: Secondary school students with special needs Year/Class 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 S.1 2,667 2,057 2,364 2,990 2,245 S.2 2,555 2,028 2,283 2,555 2,135 S.3 2,402 1,949 2,130 2,533 1,794 S.4 1,894 1,752 1,931 2,125 1,405 S.5 666 878 859 1,054 726 S.6 709 813 669 846 783 Total 10,893 9,477 10,236 12,103 9,088Source: Ministry of Education and Sports. 13
  33. 33. 2.2.1.7 Secondary school Orphans by classTable 2.2.9, indicates that the number of orphaned students has been increasing steadily over theyears with the exception of 2008 where a decline was realised. The total number of secondaryschool orphans reduced by 19 percent between 2007 and 2008.Table 2.2.9: Secondary school orphan students by class, 2004 - 2008Class/Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008S.1 42,903 43,355 51,366 68,757 51,215S.2 36,825 38,658 43,096 50,793 46,984S.3 31,822 33,721 38,811 43,775 34,642S.4 27,333 29,937 33951 39,647 30,387S.5 10,565 11,218 12,590 14,983 12,306S.6 9,410 10,693 11334 13,808 11,568Total 158,858 167,582 191,148 231,763 187,102Source: Ministry of Education and Sports2.2.3 Higher Education InstitutionsThe government policy to liberalise the education system has led to an increase in the number ofprivate higher learning institutions. The number of universities has been increasing in the last fewdecades and, in addition, more courses have been introduced, hence widening the labour market.Table 2.2.10 below indicates that 67 percent of the tertiary enrolment in 2006 was fromuniversities. Male students’ enrolment was the highest, with 58 percent, compared to the females.See details in Appendix Table 2.2.ITable 2.2.10: Higher Institutions Enrollment, 2006 EnrolmentInstitutions Number Male Female TotalUniversities 26 52,507 40,098 92,605National Teachers Colleges 9 7,316 3,681 10,997Technical Colleges 6 1,848 132 1,980Commercial Colleges 48 9,348 8,832 18,180Co-operative Colleges 209 119 328Management Institutions 8 2,000 2,156 4,156Health/ Medical Institutions 15 2,108 1,024 3,132Agricultural & Forestry Institutions 6 1,370 281 1,651Theological Colleges 2 850 248 1,098Media & Communication Institutions 2 900 576 1,476Hotels & Tourism institutions 1 81 62 143Law Dev. Centre 1 500 300 800Study Centres 2 416 188 604Grand Total 79,453 57,697 137,150Source: Ministry of education and sports 14
  34. 34. 2.2.4 LiteracyLiteracy is defined as the ability to write meaningfully and read with understanding in any language.The 2005/06 Uganda National Household Survey revealed an overall literacy rate of 69 percentamong persons aged 10 years and above. Table 2.2.11 indicates that more men were found to beliterate (76 percent) than women (63 percent). Among regions, in 2005/06, the Central regionexcluding Kampala had the highest literacy rate (80 percent), while the Northern had the lowest (59percent). Kampala had a total literacy rate of 91 percent, bearing in mind its special characteristics.The literacy rates were higher for urban dwellers (86 percent) than their rural counter parts (66percent).Table 2.2.11: Literacy rates for population aged 10 years and above 1999/00 2002/03 2005/06 Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female TotalUganda 74 57 65 77 63 70 76 63 69ResidenceUrban 92 82 86 90 84 87 89 83 86Rural 72 54 62 74 60 67 74 58 66RegionCentral exc. 81 74 77 82 74 79 82 78 80KampalaEastern 72 52 62 72 54 63 71 56 64Northern 64 33 47 72 42 56 74 45 59Western 74 61 67 79 69 74 74 60 67Kampala - - - 94 91 92 92 90 91Source: UNHS 2005/06, Uganda Bureau of Statistics 15
  35. 35. 2.3 Labour Force, Employment and EarningsEmployment generates incomes, which enable individuals and their dependants to purchase goodsand services necessary to meet their basic needs. Availability of productive employmentopportunities greatly reduces poverty.Data on labour market (jobs, job seekers, employment levels, desired skills etc) in both public andprivate sectors is important in order to have accurate information about the quantitative andqualitative aspects of the labour force. This section presents information on key labour marketindicators, employment in the civil service, employment and the wage bill for selectedmanufacturing establishments. In addition, the information on jobs advertised in newspapers givesan insight on the most demanded occupations in the country.2.3.1 Key Labour Market IndicatorsThe Labourforce Market Indicators in Uganda are based on the population in the working agebracket of 14 to 64 years. These are presented in Table 2.3.1.The total labour force in Uganda increased from 9.8 million persons in 2002/03 to 10.9 millionpersons in 2005/06. The labour force participation rate was 82 percent. The rate was slightly higherfor males than for their female counterparts during 2005/06.The unemployement rate was about 2per cent in 2005/06 while the total urban unemployment rate was about 7 percent. The time relatedunderemployment rate was about 12 percent. Thus underemployment and unemploymentaccounted for 14 percent of the labour force and 16 percent of the urban labour force.Table 2.3.1: Selected Labour Market Indicators 2002/03 2005/06Indicator Male Female Total Male Female TotalUganda labour force (Millions) 4.6 5.1 9.8 5.3 5.6 10.9Labour force participation rate 80.3 79.9 80.1 83.5 80.9 82.0Employment to population ratio 78.2 76.6 77.4 82.0 79.0 80.0Uunemployment rate 2.6 4.2 3.5 1.7 2.1 1.9Urban unemployment rate 7.6 17.0 12.2 3.5 9.5 6.9Time related underemployment rate 18.9 15.1 16.9 n.a n.a 12.1Urban time related underemployment rate 9.7 11.1 10.4 9.0 7.3 8.7Median monthly wages 60,000 32,000 54,000 48,000 20,000 36,000Source: Uganda National Household Surveys 2002/03 and 2005/06In 2005/06, the majority of the working population (70 percent) was engaged in agriculture andmainly as self-employed. By industry, agriculture employed 73 percent of the working population,while by occupation, 70 percent of the working population were agriculture and fishery workers.(Appendix Tables 2.3 A, 2.3 B and 2.3 C).Among the paid employees, the majority were temporary (mainly casual) constituting 12 percent ofthe working population. Only about 5 percent of the working population was in permanent paidemployment. 16

×