Classicism Vs Romanticism                Classicism vs.                Romanticism01/07/13                         1
Classicism Vs. Romanticism   Classic-defined by          Romantic-from    Aulos Gallius, 2nd           “romance”    cent...
Classicism      Reason prevails in all provinces of thought. The       universe is capable of rational explanation as    ...
Romanticism     Distrust of universal formulae and impatience with      rules of procedure     Development of a sense of...
Romanticism      Nature not as rational and ordered but as a mirror       of unpredictability of human emotion and of the...
Romanticism   Romantic spirit      “Something far off,       legendary, fictitious,       fantastic, and marvelous-     ...
Romanticism                               Traits:                                 Remoteness from                       ...
Romanticism   Traits      Cherishes freedom, passion, and endless pursuit of       the unattainable-a yearning after the...
Music & Words   Instrumental music is dominated by lyrical spirit of    the Lied   Composers were also writers      Car...
Romanticism   As containing contradictions and opposites         The crowd and the individual         Composers sought ...
Science & the Irrational    While the nineteenth     century saw an expansion     of exact knowledge, music     delved in...
Materialism & Idealism                                     A secular, materialistic age                                 ...
Nationalism    A patriotic     movement which     glorified the     heritage of a     country by using     its folk music...
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Classicism vs Romanticism

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Classicism vs Romanticism

  1. 1. Classicism Vs Romanticism Classicism vs. Romanticism01/07/13 1
  2. 2. Classicism Vs. Romanticism Classic-defined by  Romantic-from Aulos Gallius, 2nd “romance” century A.D.  A Medieval tale of grammarian poem treating heroic “A correctness of personages or language and style events written in one for a unique, elite, of the Romance civilized class of languages peopleListen to This 5-2By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  3. 3. Classicism  Reason prevails in all provinces of thought. The universe is capable of rational explanation as orderly, purposive, structured, and regular  Belief in reality, leaving little of validity to emotion. Mystery and miracle are dispelled  Uniform excellence desired in morals, social function, and art  The artist sought to appeal to rational good taste  For the species, not the individual  For seeking what is common to all  For revealing the order and form inherent in a work of art to thinking people of good tasteListen to This 5-3By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  4. 4. Romanticism  Distrust of universal formulae and impatience with rules of procedure  Development of a sense of awe and mystery  Cultivation of individual, national, and racial peculiarities  High value place upon originality  Every person appreciates and understands through his senses  The glorification of self-rebellion & struggle  Strong, Byronic heroes, masculine; later the emphasis shifts to the willful, dominant female idealListen to This 5-4By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  5. 5. Romanticism  Nature not as rational and ordered but as a mirror of unpredictability of human emotion and of the uncertainties of life  Fascination with the remote, the distant past. Revival in interest in Roman Catholicism as a timeless institution rooted in mystery  Life is ever becoming…evolving. Romantic artists express a longing for the unattainable. Death becomes an obsession as the only haven for fulfilling the struggle toward completenessListen to This 5-5By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  6. 6. Romanticism Romantic spirit  “Something far off, legendary, fictitious, fantastic, and marvelous- imaginary and ideal contrasted to the world of the present.”  Implies a freedom of the individual, represents all that man can become, possibilityListen to This 5-6By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  7. 7. Romanticism  Traits:  Remoteness from everyday world  Emphasis on the strange and the fantastic  Boundless: Aspires  To transcend the immediate  To reach backward and forward in time  To range outward to reach the cosmosListen to This 5-7By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  8. 8. Romanticism Traits  Cherishes freedom, passion, and endless pursuit of the unattainable-a yearning after the impossible with longing  The personality of the artists merges with the work of art  The arts themselves merge  Instrumental music seen as the only perfect vehicle for communicating deep emotions, abstract and divorced from the world, it is detached completely from the world and therefore free to work on the mind and heartListen to This 5-8By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  9. 9. Music & Words Instrumental music is dominated by lyrical spirit of the Lied Composers were also writers  Carl Maria von Weber  Robert Schumann  Hector Berlioz  Richard Wagner Program music was the solution to imbuing instrumental music with the poetic & the pictorial Instrumental accompaniment of vocal music is endowed with pictorial qualities itselfListen to This 5-9By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  10. 10. Romanticism As containing contradictions and opposites  The crowd and the individual  Composers sought haven with a few friends, while at the same time writing for a large new audience  Disappearance of patronage system  Composers write for posterity-an “ideal” audience which would appreciate work  Rise of the virtuoso performer-Paganini, Liszt-performer as hero  The composer as prophet, along & struggling heroically against a hostile environment  The simple & complex existing side by side  The Lied & Character piece-small, intimate forms  The Program Symphony & Romantic Opera: enormous works in which the composer creates an entire universeListen to This 5-10By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  11. 11. Science & the Irrational While the nineteenth century saw an expansion of exact knowledge, music delved into the unconscious and the supernatural, into dreams and myth. Nature was seen as fraught with mysterious significance way beyond scientific fact-findingListen to This 5-11By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  12. 12. Materialism & Idealism  A secular, materialistic age  Rise of the Industrial Revolution  A turning away from organized religion, revival of interest in Catholicism was for its tradition & mystery of ritual  The arts were seen as a religion in themselves  Sacred music was often idealistic and of immense proportion, a longing for the eternalListen to This 5-12By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  13. 13. Nationalism A patriotic movement which glorified the heritage of a country by using its folk music and historical subjects in theatrical or program musicListen to This 5-13By Mark Evan Bonds PRENTICE HALL ©2009 Pearson Education, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458

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