Romeo and Juliet strong emotion question

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Romeo and Juliet strong emotion question

  1. 1. How does Shakespeare exploreextreme emotions in the openingscene of Act 1?
  2. 2. Learning ObjectivesWe are learning to...• Select quotes for analysis that show how Shakespeare explores strong emotions from the beginning of the play• Analyse the language of charactersSkills for Life: Commitment to success and Questioning
  3. 3. AO1: Write well with PEE+AO2: discuss layers of meaning to impact upon the audienceAO4: Comment on the time itwas written and how it links to other books, plays etc.
  4. 4. An essay title: Explore the ways that Shakespeare presents strong emotions between parent and child in Romeo & Juliet and Othello to interest the audience.
  5. 5. Emotion Point Evidence Explanation of effect Anger Love Threats Insults Hatred I Humour
  6. 6. Emotion Point Evidence Explanation of effect We learn a great deal of ‘I hate the word / As I This would have been Tybalt’s character when he hate hell, all Montagues, extremely shocking for Hatred enters and sees the and Thee the audience as they were Montagues. religious people and would imply that Tybalt’s hatred is intense. Love Threats In Act 1 Shakespeare ‘’A dog of that house...’ Here Sampson is Insults introduces the audience to revealing his hatred of the hatred of the two the Montague family by families by the insults they referring to them as use towards each other. ‘dogs’. This would have been a derogatory remark about fellow citizens. Anger I Humour
  7. 7. How does Shakespeare present strong emotions at thebeginning of the play? Introduce your line of argument P Point that is relevant to the question.A skilled 1. Put forward a simple answer to the question that dealspoint will… generally with how the emotion is conveyed to the audience.eg. Shakespeare presents strong emotions by immediatelypresenting Tybalt’s hatred in Act 1, scene 1.An excellent 1. Pick out a specific aspect of the way the character is presentedpoint will… 2. Identify the language used to create this presentationeg. Shakespeare presents strong emotions by immediatelypresenting Tybalt’s absolute hatred of the Montagues to theaudience in Act 1, scene 1 through the language he uses.
  8. 8. How does Shakespeare present strong emotions at thebeginning of the play? Select a short quotation from E Evidence the text that supports your argument.Skilled 1. Pick out a quotation from the text that acts as anevidence example of the point you have madewill…eg. ‘...and talk of peace? I hate the word/As I hate hell, allMontagues, and thee.’Excellent 1. Introduce the quotation to show the link to theevidence pointwill…eg. The character of Tybalt is presented as someone full ofhatred, anger and implied violence, ‘...and talk of peace? I hatethe word/As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.’
  9. 9. How does Shakespeare present strong emotions at thebeginning of the play? Directly analyse your E Explanation quotation to demonstrate how it supports your argument.A skilled 1. Give an overview of why your quotation proves yourexplanation pointwill…eg. This implies that Tybalt is angry and full of hatred.An excellent 1. Put forward more than one idea – and those ideasexplanation will be increasingly original (not the obvious ones)will… 2. Refer to specific words within the quotation and explain their impact on the reader (connotations)eg. This implies that Tybalt is totally consumed by his hatred of theMontagues, his reference to ‘hell’ reinforces this and the audience willunderstand from the very beginning of the play that he will not be persuadedto forget the feud between the families.
  10. 10. How does Shakespeare present strong emotions at thebeginning of the play? Link your analysis to other ideas and Further + quotations from the rest of the book or its social/ historical context to explanation conclude your argument.Skilled further 1. Link the explanation very briefly to another part of the text, but without reference to the textexplanation 2. Comment very briefly on what was going on in the world when the book was writtenwill…eg. The audience understand from The Prologue that the two lovers take their lives andit is only with their deaths that the feud ends. And so are prepared for more violenceand tragedy.Excellent further 1. Bring in short quotations from elsewhere in the book to show how the same idea is explored in different placesexplanation 2. Put forward original alternative interpretations of what ideas the characterwill… represents 3. Explain in detail why the writer wrote in this wayeg. Here Shakespeare is foreshadowing the inevitable deaths of some characters asTybalt is unable to abate his hatred. The audience have already been told in thePrologue that it is only with the deaths of Romeo and Juliet they will ,’bury theirparents’ strife’. When Tybalt draws the analogy to ‘hell’ to explain the extent of hishatred of Montagues as, ‘I hate hell, all Montagues. And thee’, the audience would beshocked by his absolute hatred, as an Elizabethan audience was highly religious.
  11. 11. An excellent PEE+ paragraph Topic sentence (Point)Shakespeare prepares the audience from the very beginning of the play forstrong emotions through the characters and the language they use. For examplethe character of Tybalt is revealed in Act 1, scene 1 through the language he uses.Tybalt is presented as someone full of hatred, anger and violence: Evidence‘...and talk of peace? I hate the wordAs I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.’ ExplanationThis implies that Tybalt is totally consumed by his hatred of the Montagues, andfrom this statement the audience will understand from the very beginning of theplay that he will not be persuaded to forget the feud between the families. HereShakespeare is foreshadowing the inevitable deaths of characters as Tybalt isunable to abate his hatred. The audience have already been told in the Prologuethat it is only with the deaths of Romeo and Juliet they will ,’bury their parents’strife’. When Tybalt draws the analogy to ‘hell’ to explain the extent of his hatredof Montagues as, ‘I hate hell, all Montagues. And thee’, the audience would beshocked by his absolute hatred, as an Elizabethan audience was highly religious. Explanation +
  12. 12. Similarly, the audience understands the anger of the Prince in Act 1 when heattempts to stop the feuding. The audience would understand that the feud hasbeen destroying the peace and has done so for a very long time. In the Prince’sspeech Shakespeare uses powerful imagery to express strong emotions andensure that the audience are fully aware of the extent of the feud. The families aredescribed as ‘beasts’ and their fighting as ‘pernicious rage’. This imagerydevelops the idea that the emotions of the families are out of control and that theyare behaving like animals. When The Prince refers to their ‘cankered hate’ we asthe audience are fully aware of how long this feud has been going on. We areprepared for the Prince to remind the families that:If ever you disturb our streets again,Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.Shakespeare is foreshadowing the deaths of members of the families andpreparing the audience for the extreme emotions of hatred and violence tocontinue.
  13. 13. Success CriteriaSkilled Writing 1. Identify and comment on the writers’ usewill of language to contribute to effect. 2. Identify and compare features of writers’ use of language with some explanation. 3. Commentary embeds appropriate quotations to support main ideaExcellent 1. Have a detailed explanation, withWriting appropriate terminology, of how language and structure are used to present emotionwill 2. Comments begin to develop precise, perceptive comparison of presentation of strong emotion 3. Presentation of characters makes detailed reference to the historical context

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