Tracee M. PearsonCollection Development PlanFRIT 7134- Spring 2009March 4, 2009SCHOOL SITE DESCRIPTION AND LEARNER ANALYSI...
Media Center operates on a flexible schedule with visits being an extension of eachteacher’s classroom learning activities...
that is co-taught by the homeroom and EIP teacher. For Learner Analysis Totals, seeTable 1 below: R.E. McNair Discovery   ...
CURRICULUM REVIEW        Below are the Georgia Performance Standards which represent the specificlearning goals related to...
Fifth       Vocabulary                      ELA5R3            The student will keep a vocabulary                          ...
encyclopedias, almanacs, and dictionaries. The encyclopedias that help make up thecollection include classics such as The ...
Encyclopedia Britannica, and various videos and miscellaneous materials.       For this Collection Development Plan, I cho...
MATERIALS ORDER/CONSIDERATION FILE            Title/Item Number/             Item                   GradeVendor      Descr...
Follett                                  video       Harry J.     All          A look at a               VideoTitlewave   ...
expressions, thisappealing referencebook includes samplesentences, asubstantive cross-referencing index,and amusingillustr...
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Collection Development Plan

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Collection Development Plan

  1. 1. Tracee M. PearsonCollection Development PlanFRIT 7134- Spring 2009March 4, 2009SCHOOL SITE DESCRIPTION AND LEARNER ANALYSIS Welcome! You are entering the doors of the Ronald E. McNair DiscoveryLearning Academy. This Pre-K-5th grade school is located in Decatur, Georgia,approximately ten miles east of downtown Atlanta. It is situated in a low socio-economiccommunity with more than 90% of its 859 students receiving free or reduced lunch.McNair Discovery Learning Academy opened its doors for the first time on August 11,2008, to students. There are sixty-six certified educators, three administrators, two counselors, andthirty support personnel. The school is a Discovery Learning Academy with a communityoriented focus. What this means is that in addition to its daily instructional program, theschool depends on subject matter experts to visit regularly and facilitate classroomdiscussions with students, while maintaining a focus on the Georgia PerformanceStandards. The faculty and staff of the school operate in PLCs (Professional LearningCommunities). Each PLC consists of three grade levels which meet bimonthly. TheMedia Center serves as the hub, or focal point, of the school. It is located near the frontentrance of the building and houses 14, 340 books. It contains two office spaces, onestorage room, one audio/visual room, one media production room, and one conferenceroom. Computers in our library are used for our electronic card catalog, connecting to theInternet and online encyclopedias, and using the Accelerated Reader program. The 1
  2. 2. Media Center operates on a flexible schedule with visits being an extension of eachteacher’s classroom learning activities. This Collection Development Plan focuses on the topic of reading comprehensionand the use of reference materials to locate information for three reasons: 1) this is thesubject area in which students in grades 3 and 5 must meet promotion requirements forthe Criterion Referenced Competency Tests (800+ is a passing score), and 2) this strandof reading (or a similar component) is addressed at least five times in the GeorgiaPerformance Standards for elementary students, and 3) based on current school data, thisis one skill in which students on most grade levels need assistance.The grade levels of focus for this assignment are first, third, and fifth grades. In firstgrade, there are a total of 6 classes and teachers containing 120 students. About 20 ofthese students are served by an EIP teacher. All EIP students are performing below gradelevel expectations in reading/language arts, math, or both, and are served by two EIPteachers. The classes have a total of 10 gifted students. In grade three, there are a total of 7 classes and teachers containing a combinedtotal of 145 students. There is one self-contained Early Intervention Program (EIP) classthat has 16 students. About 24 of the students in third grade are served by EIP teachers,and there are 5 gifted students. As in grade one the EIP students are performing belowgrade level expectations in reading/language arts, math, or both. For fifth grade, there are six classes and homeroom teachers with 125 students.There are two gender-based classes (one all girls, one all boys), each containing 17students. Seven of the 125 students are served in the gifted program (Discovery), and 25students are served by EIP teachers. In addition to these students, there is one model class 2
  3. 3. that is co-taught by the homeroom and EIP teacher. For Learner Analysis Totals, seeTable 1 below: R.E. McNair Discovery First Third Fifth Total Grade Grade Grade Learning AcademyStudents 120 145 125 390Girls 45 61 74 180Boys 75 84 51 210African American 118 142 125 385Hispanic 2 3 0 5Asian 0 0 0 0Caucasian 0 0 0 0EIP Class 20 24 25 69ESOL 2 3 0 5Gifted 10 5 7 22Learning/Cognitive Disability 3 10 8 21Below Grade Reading 17 15 20 52Previously Retained 4 11 15 30McNair Discovery Learning Academy is a Targeted Assisted school, which means thatthis school year it is receiving a total allocation of $186, 175.00 in government funds toimprove instructional services and/or aid in staff development programs. One area inwhich these funds are spent is through the Afterschool Tutorial Program. The programserves to give additional instruction to those students who scored below grade level inreading and/or math the previous school year on the CRCT (Criterion ReferenceCompetency Test). Test scores are based on the following: Key Reading/Math Level I: Below 799 Reading Only Level I: Below 799 Reading/Math Low Level II: 800-810 Reading Only Low Level II: 800-810 3
  4. 4. CURRICULUM REVIEW Below are the Georgia Performance Standards which represent the specificlearning goals related to reading comprehension and using reference materials:Grade 1- COMPREHENSION ELA1R6 The student uses a variety of strategies tounderstand and gain meaning from grade-level text. The studentk. Begins to use dictionary and glossary skills to determine word meanings.Grade 3- COMPREHENSION ELA3R3 The student uses a variety of strategies to gainmeaning from grade-level text. The studentr. Applies dictionary, thesaurus, and glossary skills to determine word meanings.Grade 5- ELA5R3 The student understands and acquires new vocabulary and uses itcorrectly in reading and writing. The studentd. Determines pronunciations, meanings, alternate word choices, and parts ofspeech of words using dictionaries and thesauruses.See Table 2 below for performance tasks for each standard and grade level: Reading Comprehension- Reference SkillsGrade Content Standards Performance TaskFirst Concepts of Print, ELA1R1 The student will read to research facts and produce a report. Vocabulary, and ELA1R5 The student may complete an outline or Comprehension ELA1R6 graphic organizer designed by the teacher while researching previously selected books and materials. The student may contribute his/her research to a class big book (continents, landforms, and city, county, state). (Sample books may include Me on the Map by Joan Sweeny and Annette Cable.) The student may orally share information with the class.Third Vocabulary and ELA3R2 The student will correctly use multiple meaning words by developing a book Listening/Speaking/Viewing ELA3LSV1 that ELA3R3 demonstrates evidence of understanding, and s/he will present the book to the class or another class. For example: F Flip book F Fold out book F Personal dictionary F Journal writing 4
  5. 5. Fifth Vocabulary ELA5R3 The student will keep a vocabulary journal documenting interesting and/or unusual words encountered during independent reading, guided reading, or a teacher read-aloud. In the vocabulary journal the student will list the word, its meaning, write a brief response describing their initial encounter with the word (their thoughts on the word, the strategies they used to pronounce the word and to gain meaning, etc.), and use it in a sentence. The student may add his/her word(s) to the word wall. Students may participate in peer conferences and/or the author’s chair to discuss and share newly acquired vocabulary.COLLECTION EVALUATIONTo determine the condition of the reference collection at Ronald E. McNair DiscoveryLearning Academy, the following collection evaluation techniques were used:  Checking Lists (copies obtained from Media Specialist)  Scanning Shelves (It was a quick process that provided data instantly)  Comparing Statistics (It was used to compare the number of reference materials to other materials available in the Media Center)My techniques were mainly collection-centered because I looked at actual materials.I began my evaluation by speaking with the Media Specialist. She and I decided to do ateam teaching activity with a group of third graders using dictionaries to examine thedegree of difficulty in which students had with this skill. Students were placed in groups,and at each group, there were dictionaries and worksheets that gave directions forlocating specific words. During this activity, about 7 of the 21 students needed assistancelocating words, and were instructed on the use of guide words in their search for answers.Upon completing this lesson, I perused the entire Reference collection in the MediaCenter. The Dewey Reference section (000) is comprised of 623 titles. This includes 5
  6. 6. encyclopedias, almanacs, and dictionaries. The encyclopedias that help make up thecollection include classics such as The World Book and Encyclopedia Britannica. Inaddition to these, there are also online reference materials (i.e. Galileo, EncyclopediaBritannica Online, and Compton’s). The entire collection of encyclopedias looked nearlynew, whereas dictionaries looked a little older, one published in 1986. I was impressedwith the various types of dictionaries available to students: English and Spanish,Swedish, Japanese, French, World Book, picture, biographical). I saw a Junior PictureDictionary that was published in 1978, and was a bit concerned since we are a newschool. Our Media Specialist explained that some books in the collection are olderbecause before moving into McNair Discovery Learning Academy, she and her assistanthad to weed the collection of books from three schools that were closing to create part ofthe collection for our school. She stated that they couldn’t weed everything. Per ourdiscussion, it was noted that students utilized the encyclopedias more than thedictionaries because teachers placed a lot of emphasis on projects. However, use of theinternet greatly outweighs the use of either of these books due to ease of use, volume ofinformation, and popularity. Also, unlike other available materials in the Media Center,some of the reference materials may not be checked out. When the Media Specialist wasasked if she could add to any collection in the Media Center, which area it would be, shestated it would be literature- Easy section. In total, only 77 reference materials have beenchecked out this year. Our Media Specialist states that this is primarily due to a late start-up in the Media Center because she and her assistant were busy shelving and cataloguingbooks at the beginning of the school year. In our school’s reference collection, there are67 dictionaries, 41 children’s encyclopedias, 291 World Book materials, 1 set of 6
  7. 7. Encyclopedia Britannica, and various videos and miscellaneous materials. For this Collection Development Plan, I chose to focus on the use of dictionariesand other reference materials because a dictionary is one of the most useful tools that achild can have access to. It not only helps them with spelling, definitions, andpronunciations, it serves as a valuable language learning tool for reading and writing. Useof these types of materials allows children to expand their vocabularies. 7
  8. 8. MATERIALS ORDER/CONSIDERATION FILE Title/Item Number/ Item GradeVendor Description Type Author Level Review Publisher PriceFollett Childrens And Young Adult Book- various K-3 This Set/Series LibrariesTitlewave Literature Reference HRD Contains 24 Titles Unlimited $1,603.68 relating to various genres.Follett Hardcover N/A K-5 The major reference OceanoTitlewave Great Encyclopedic Set/Series encyclopedia meets the dictionary in this $648.44 Dictionary-Spanish- unique work. (#L178XX0) Essential knowledge areas are scrupulously covered through a variety of resources, including 300,000 words and definitions in the Spanish language, more than 10,000 full-color illustrations, a complete and current universal atlas, and an extensive chronology.Follett Hardcover N/A 3-6 This innovative series CrabtreeTitlewave Crabtree Visual Dictionaries Set/Series is designed to introduce historic Pub. $79.80 [set/series] (#R963XX1) communities in a thematic way. Each theme is featured in a two-page spread and covers such topics as homes, clothing, transportation, tools, etc. 8
  9. 9. Follett video Harry J. All A look at a VideoTitlewave Dictionaries and their recording Karabel; variety of English Tutor $29.95 meanings. : Part one written by dictionaries, with (#40A6CV9) Edward B. an emphasis on Jenkinson, pronunciation Michael J. Griffin. guides.Follett Dictionaries and their video Harry J. All A look at a VideoTitlewave meanings. : Part two recording Karabel; variety of English Tutor $29.95 (#40B39V3) written by dictionaries, with Edward B. an emphasis on Jenkinson, pronunciation Michael J. Griffin. guides.Library ABC Pronunciary: American DVD N/A Grades 5 This American N/AVideo.Com English Pronunciation to Adults English $34.95 pronunciation Dictionary (Full Screen)- dictionary teaches the V9671 sounds of the alphabet, including vowels, consonants, digraphs, blends and silent letters. The program includes a full description of the mouth formation, with word examples for each sound, as well as contrasts and practice sentences.Scholastic Reference N/A Grades 4-7 Vocabulary, N/ABooks Scholastic Childrens Spelling, Word $15.96 Dictionary Origins and Usage, Parts of SpeechScholastic Reference N/A Grades 3 & With definitions and N/ABooks Scholastic Dictionary of - Up origins for over 600 $8.95 Paperback everyday American Idioms sayings and 9
  10. 10. expressions, thisappealing referencebook includes samplesentences, asubstantive cross-referencing index,and amusingillustrations. $2, 451.64 10

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