Metallic bonds

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Metallic bonds

  1. 1. Metallic Bonds
  2. 2. Metallic Bonds  Alloys are the every-day metals that we encounter. They are a mixture of two or more types of metals.  Alloys are generally stronger and less reactive than the pure metals that they are made from.
  3. 3. Metallic Bonds Most metals have only 1,2 or 3 valence electrons.  This means that they always “give up” their electrons (similar to an ionic bond)  When atoms give up electrons, the atom becomes positive. 
  4. 4. Metallic Bonds In metallic bonds, the atoms come together  Once the atoms are together, their valence electrons move around them creating a sea of negativity.  The atoms release their specific electrons and allow them to flow around all of the atoms bonded together. 
  5. 5. Metallic Bonds These metallic bonds are held together by the positive metal ions and the sea of negative electrons around them.  The more valence electrons an atom can add to the “sea” the stronger the metal becomes. 
  6. 6. Metallic Bonds  Because these bonds are not formed through a rigid structure, metals have special properties: Malleability and Ductility  Luster (shiny)  Electrical conductivity  Thermal (heat) conductivity 
  7. 7. Metallic Bonds  Because these bonds are not formed through a rigid structure, metals have special properties: Malleability and Ductility  Luster (shiny)  Electrical conductivity  Thermal (heat) conductivity 

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