The presidency

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The presidency

  1. 1. The JobSuccessionNominatingElectingTHEPRESIDENCY
  2. 2.  Natural born citizen At least 35 years old JFK (youngest elected);TR (youngest to serve);Reagan (oldest elected) 14 years a resident of USInformal QualificationsWHO CAN BE PRESIDENT?
  3. 3.  Four years, with an option for four more Not codified until 1951…Why? (22nd Amendment) George Washington’s precedent Should the 22nd Amendment be repealed? Would a single, 6 year term be better?THE PRESIDENT’S TERM
  4. 4.  $400,000/year with $50,000 a year expense Perks:HOW’S THE PAY?
  5. 5. WHAT DOES THE PRESIDENT DO?
  6. 6.  ―personal embodiment and representative of their dignity andmajesty‖ – W. H. Tafthttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXuxCqPKflo(Bush throws first pitch_CHIEF OF STATE
  7. 7.  Leader of the executive branch What does this include? 2.7 million employees $2.5 trillion budgetCHIEF EXECUTIVE/CHIEF ADMINISTRATOR
  8. 8.  Architect of foreign policyCHIEF DIPLOMAT
  9. 9.  Leads the armed forces Why has the president’s power in this realm grown?COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF
  10. 10.  Sets the public policy agenda CANNOT write laws Suggests, initiates, insists and demands from CongressCHIEF LEGISLATOR
  11. 11. Chief of PartyChief Citizen ―place of moral leadership‖ -- FDRNON-CONSTITUTIONAL ROLES
  12. 12. THE BULLY PULPIT
  13. 13. What happens if the president dies? VP assumes the office Not a reality until John Tyler came topower after the death of William HenryHarrison Constitution: ―powers andduties…devolve to the vice president.‖ 25th Amendment (1967) lays out theprocess of presidential succession Presidential Succession Act of 1947:Congress fixes the order of successionPRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION
  14. 14. THE CURIOUS CASE OF EDITH GALT
  15. 15. What happens if the president is disabled? Nothing, before the 25th Amendmentprovided for this scenario Office goes to VP if: 1. President informs Congress, inwriting, that he or she cannot dischargethe duties of the office 2. VP and majority of the Cabinet informsCongress, in writing, that the presidentcannot fulfill the duties of the office 1985: Reagan 2002: George W. BushPRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSION
  16. 16.  What are the Constitutional duties of the VP? 9 VPs have succeeded to the PresidencyThe Modern Vice-Presidency Balancing the Ticket A Co-President?THE VICE-PRESIDENT
  17. 17.  "I do not propose to be buried until I am dead." — DanielWebster, turning down the vice presidency in 1839. Being vice president is comparable to "a man in a cataleptic fit; hecannot speak; he cannot move; he suffers no pain; he is perfectlyconscious of all that goes on, but has no part in it." — Thomas R.Marshall, vice president under Woodrow Wilson. "I am vice president. In this I am nothing, but I may be everything." —John Adams "The second office of this government is honorable and easy, the first isbut a splendid misery." — Thomas Jefferson "I would a great deal rather be anything, say professor of history, thanvice president." — Theodore Roosevelt "I go to funerals. I go to earthquakes." — Nelson Rockefeller "The vice president has two duties. One is to inquire daily as to thehealth of the president, and the other is to attend the funerals of ThirdWorld dictators. And neither of those do I find an enjoyable exercise."Presidential candidate John McCain, in 2000
  18. 18. Original Plan Electors from each state cast two ballots, each for a differentcandidate. Who were the electors? Most votes: President Second most votes: VPCHOOSING THE PRESIDENT
  19. 19.  By election of 1796, parties take shape Adams wins; Jefferson his VPElection of 1800 Both political parties nominate Pres & VP candidates &electors Jefferson & Burr tie; House elects Jefferson12th Amendment Electors vote for a Pres & VP candidatePOLITICAL PARTIES:A WRENCH IN THE WORKS
  20. 20. Party Conventions Both major parties using by 1832 Creation of the political parties Each state given a number of delegates Who are these delegates & how are they chosen?NOMINATING THE PRESIDENT
  21. 21.  Most delegates chosen through primaries Process varies from state to state Most states award delegates proportionallyFront-loading New Hampshire has, by state law, held first primary since 1940 States continue to move primaries up on the calendar. Why? How does front-loading impact the process?https:// www.you tu be.c o m/ wa tch? v =X 5OfR i oyK i w(NH prima ry)PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES
  22. 22.  What’s good about New Hampshire being first? What’s bad about New Hampshire being first?NEW HAMPSHIRE PRIMARY
  23. 23. National Primary Pros ConsRegional Primaries Pros ConsREFORMING THE PRIMARIES
  24. 24.  States without a primary choose delegates via caucus Caucus-goers gather, debate, and select a candidate Iowa always the first caucushttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RXie7FJqOA(Iowa)CAUCUSES
  25. 25.  Most decisions made before delegates show up President & VP candidates formally nominated Party platforms decided…candidates not beholden to them Why are conventions still important?NATIONAL CONVENTION
  26. 26.  Be a governor of a large state Be a US Senator Be a WASP Be telegenicHOW TO GETNOMINATED FOR PRESIDENT
  27. 27. What happens if there’s a tie? Decided by the House Each state one vote 1800 & 1824http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ok_VQ8I7g6Ihttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUS9mM8Xbbw(Electoral College CGPGrey )https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wC42HgLA4k(flaws in EC)HomeworkTHE ELECTORAL COLLEGE
  28. 28. THREE FLAWS IN THE SYSTEM
  29. 29.  Popular vote winner does not always win Electoral votes are winner-take-all Small states are over-represented (CA v.WY) 1824; 1876; 1888; 2000 15 presidents have won without amajority (11 plurality) Distorted reflection of popular vote…Isthis bad? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEB9hWYMpA0 (Election 2000)THE AL GORE CONUNDRUM
  30. 30.  Electors not require to vote for the candidate favored by his orher state Has happened, but has never impacted results of an election Faithless electorsTHE ROGUE ELECTOR MALFUNCTION
  31. 31.  Third party candidates could prevent a candidate from gettinga majority Close in 1912, 1924, 1948, 1968 Would throw election to House (Problems?)1.2.3.THE GEORGE WALLACE RECURRENCE
  32. 32. FOUR REFORM PROPOSALS
  33. 33.  Scrap the Electoral College all together Popular vote winner always wins All votes equalCons: Small states opposed Weaken federalism TV CampaignDIRECT POPULAR ELECTION
  34. 34.  Electors chosen in the same way as member of Congress No more winner-take-all More accurate reflection of popular voteCons No guarantee popular vote winner wins Encourage gerrymanderingDISTRICT PLAN
  35. 35.  Candidates get electoral votes proportional to votes received Example: 40% of the vote in a 20 electoral vote state gets: Eliminates winner-take-allCons: Small states over-represented Loser of popular vote could still win election Increased clout of minor partiesPROPORTIONAL PLAN
  36. 36.  Keeps electoral college largely in tact Winner of popular vote also gets 102 electoral votes (321) If no majority, run-off election is held Electors themselves eliminatedCons: Little support Difficult to understand WackyNATIONAL BONUS PLAN
  37. 37.  Known process Has worked well, with few exceptions Identifies winner quickly and certainly Provides winner a mandateSUPPORTING THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE

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