First aid basics 2 ppt

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  • Resources needed Lesson presentation. Activity 3: sticky notes (for memory game) Homework task: Baby CPR flowchart 2; Child CPR flowchart 2 or Adult CPR flowchart 2.
  • Using the powerpoint presentation This lesson is designed to allow for flexible planning for lessons between 30 and 90 minutes. Refer to the lesson plan to help select activities. For a 30 minute lesson, for example, follow: the introduction one 10 minute activity from ‘Activity one’ one 10 minute activity from ‘Activity two’ then finish with a five minute plenary.
  • Introduction Ask: “How do you think you could help someone who had stopped breathing?” Students could describe possible responses. More information about the heart and lungs can be found in the Additional resources. (Time needed: 5 minutes)
  • to assess an unconscious person Note - If you are using Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 or earlier, this animation may not function. Remove the box manually to reveal underlying text. Ask: “What do you think is the right thing to do when you first come across someone who’s collapsed?” Challenge students to decide on four priorities and to write these as bullet points. Click the red box onscreen to check the students’ ideas. This is an opportunity to revise the main points of First aid basics lesson 1 . (Time needed: 5 minutes.)
  • to assess an unconscious person Remind pupils of the learning of the recovery position lesson by asking them to explain why Jasmine did what she did. Ask the class what kind of thing could they say to try and get a response. (eg. What happened? Open your eyes” )
  • a. how to perform CPR on an adult
  • b. how to perform CPR on an adult Stress the fact that it is dangerous to give CPR to anyone who is still breathing. Explain that that is why we use a manikin.
  • b. how to perform CPR on an adult Ask students to study the 2 photos shown. Cover a photo and challenge individual students to describe it in detail. Do the same with the second picture. Point out that it is dangerous to practise CPR on someone who hasn’t stopped breathing. Watch the video clip and make notes to show the similarities and differences between adult CPR and child CPR (on the next slide) (Alternative activity. Time needed: 10 minutes)
  • c. how to perform CPR on a child Explain that in first aid a child is someone over the age of one and before puberty. Watch the video clip asking children to spot similarities and differences between adult and child CPR. (Alternative activity. Time needed: 10 minutes)
  • d. how to perform CPR on a baby As students watch the video, encourage them to note down any differences between adult CPR and CPR for a baby. Compare notes and then watch the video again. (Alternative activity. Time needed: 5 minutes)
  • e. how to treat a big bleed Ask students to guess at the figures represented by the question marks. When you click on the slide, they will be revealed.
  • e. how to treat a big bleed
  • e. how to treat a big bleed After viewing the video clip, students could work together to solve the storyboard activity given on the next slide. When students have watched the video clip ask them to write a summary. They can then compare their summary with the next slide. (Time needed: 5 minutes)
  • e. how to treat a big bleed
  • e. how to treat a big bleed Ask students to complete the storyboard. Note - If you are using Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 or earlier, these animations may not function. Remove the boxes manually to reveal underlying text. (Alternative activity. Time needed: 10 minutes)
  • f . how to recognise and treat clinical shock
  • f . how to recognise and treat clinical shock Play a memory game. Allow students 10 seconds to study the screen, then cover each caption with a sticky note. Challenge individuals to recall the hidden information. Reveal each item briefly then cover again, until class members are confident about how to spot shock. (Time needed: 5 minutes) Extra information: Skin becomes cold and clammy as body temperature falls - the result of blood diverting from the body surface to the vital organs. Blueness in skin tone is also the result of the absence of oxygenated blood. Breathlessness, dizziness and restlessness are all reactions to the body’s lack of oxygen and an attempt by the casualty to remedy this.
  • f . how to recognise and treat clinical shock Extra information: A blanket is placed under the casualty to insulate him or her from the ground and conserve body heat. Clothing is loosened to remove constrictions (especially around the neck, chest and waist) and so improve blood flow.
  • f . how to recognise and treat clinical shock Students work in threes to act out an emergency situation. One student plays the casualty of an accident who has a deep cut to the left arm, another plays the role of first aider. The third student is the operator at ambulance control, who responds to the first aider’s emergency call and sends an ambulance. What questions would the operator ask the first aider? e.g. “Can you see anything inside the wound?” . What advice would the operator give? e.g. “Press on the wound and raise the arm above heart level.” When the wound has been treated, the casualty goes into shock. What would the first aider see and describe? What would the operator advise them to do? (If you would like to display these notes, click the ‘activity notes’ button which will take you to slide 24) (Alternative activity. Time needed: 20 minutes)
  • Plenary
  • Plenary
  • Interactive quiz will take around 5 -10 minutes to complete. For questions on CPR go to the “Main Stage ” area. For questions on Bleeding and shock go to the “Small Stage”. Differentiated homework tasks: Less able students – Draw a set of pictures to illustrate a CPR flowchart. (3 charts: Baby CPR flowchart 2, Child CPR flowchart 2 and Adult CPR flowchart 2 are available in the Lesson resources). More able students – Continue the story from the opening given on screen.
  • (Activity notes for slide 19)
  • First aid basics 2 ppt

    1. 1. Learning objectives You will learn: a. to assess an unconscious person b. how to perform CPR on an adult c. how to perform CPR on a child d. how to perform CPR on a baby e. how to treat a big bleed f. how to recognise and treat clinical shock.
    2. 2. The lungs carry oxygen into the blood when you breathe. The heart pumps the blood to every part of the body. Every part of the body needs oxygen. Without it, the body dies. That person is in big trouble. Could you save them? If someone’s breathing stops…. …or if someone’s heart stops beating… …no oxygen gets through. Introduction
    3. 3. > check for danger > try to get a response > open the airway > check for breathing Jasmine’s story “Me and my mates were in the park when this jogger collapsed. He was running along one moment and the next he was lying on the ground…” What was the right thing to do? Click here to see. a. to assess an unconscious person
    4. 4. Jasmine’s story “It was a scary situation. But I just concentrated on doing the right thing and that kept me calm…” “It seemed safe enough and I was with my mates. I tried shaking the man’s shoulders and spoke to him, but got no reaction so I knew he was unconscious, so we shouted for help. I tilted his head back and lifted his chin to open the airway so I could check to see if he was breathing…” a. to assess an unconscious person
    5. 5. If someone is not breathing, you have to act fast! And stay calm… Call 999 for an ambulance. Then, it’s time for CPR…. b. how to perform CPR on an adult He’s not breathing! Stay calm…
    6. 6. Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation – CPR for short. It sounds complicated - but it’s not that tricky. You press on someone’s chest and breathe into someone’s mouth to keep them alive. The chest compressions do the job of the heart – pushing blood around the body, the breathing gets oxygen into their lungs. b. how to perform CPR on an adult
    7. 7. CPR – How do I do it? Call 999 before you start! This video clip shows you more! 30 chest compressions 2 rescue breaths b. how to perform CPR on an adult
    8. 8. If a child is unconscious you have to be more gentle. Tap shoulders gently to try to get a response. This video shows you more! c. how to perform CPR on a child
    9. 9. If a baby stops breathing, you have to be a lot more gentle. This video clip shows you what to do. d. how to perform CPR on a baby
    10. 10. ? e. how to treat a big bleed If someone is losing a lot of blood, you need to act. Blood carries oxygen to every body part – without it the body dies. Adults each have about 6 litres of blood. If an adult loses more than 1.5 litres, his or her life is in danger. Children have much less blood, so it’s even more important to act quickly. ? ?
    11. 11. “I dropped a glass and cut my arm really badly clearing it up. There was so much blood! It was all over the kitchen floor. I started to panic, but my girlfriend was there and she knew what to do…” e. how to treat a big bleed
    12. 12. When you can see a lot of blood, you have to act fast… Click on the button to see what to do. How do you treat a big bleed? To answer this question… > Watch the video clip. e. how to treat a big bleed
    13. 13. How do you treat a big bleed? 1. Press on the wound 2. Raise the wound above heart level 3. Bandage the wound 4. Call 999 for an ambulance. e. how to treat a big bleed
    14. 14. e. how to treat a big bleed Do you know how to treat a deep wound to the arm? Put the pictures in the right order… The right order is: Click for answers H D B G E A C F
    15. 15. If you lose too much blood, you go into shock. This is not the kind of shock you get at a sudden surprise. This is clinical shock, where your body starts to shut down… Vital organs like the heart, lungs and brain cannot get enough oxygen from the blood that is left. They start to pack up. You have to act fast. Left untreated, shock can kill. f. how to recognise and treat clinical shock
    16. 16. how to spot shock pale, cold clammy skin fast, shallow breathing restlessness blueness around lips or ear lobesfeels weak and dizzy thirst feels like throwing up f. how to recognise and treat clinical shock
    17. 17. f. how to recognise and treat clinical shock Internal bleeding can also lead to shock. Both problems are caused by a lack of blood flowing to the vital organs. So you deal with both problems in the same way…
    18. 18. > Treat any big bleeds. > Help casualty to lie down. > Raise casualty’s legs above heart level, so the blood runs to the vital organs where it is most needed. > Loosen casualty’s clothing. > Call 999 for an ambulance. > Keep casualty warm – lie them on a blanket or coat and cover them with another one. > Do not let casualty eat, drink or smoke. Activity notes f. how to recognise and treat clinical shock I’ll keep talking to her and checking her breathing until the ambulance comes.
    19. 19. Plenary The main points again… > check for danger > try to get a response > open the airway > check for breathing > give chest compressions. Remember it all like this….
    20. 20. Big bleed > Press on the wound. > Raise it above heart level. > Bandage the wound. Shock > Lie casualty down. > Raise casualty’s feet above heart level. > Keep casualty warm. Call 999 as soon as you can Plenary
    21. 21. You’ve now completed this lesson about first aid basics. Test your knowledge in our interactive quiz or find out more with one of these activities… Interactive quiz Read a CPR flowchart. Draw a set of pictures for it. “Lee stumbled towards me, blood trickling down his arm…” Finish the story. Find out more
    22. 22. Back to presentation > Work in threes to act out an emergency situation. > In your groups of three decide who will be: – the casualty of an accident who has a deep cut to the left arm. – the role of first-aider. – the operator at ambulance control. > What questions would the operator ask the first-aider? e.g. “Can you see anything inside the wound?”. > What advice would the operator give? e.g. “Press on the wound and raise the arm above heart level.” > When the wound has been treated, the casualty goes into shock. > What would the first-aider see and describe? What would the operator advise them to do?

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