Unit 2 - Notes on Portraiture

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Unit 2 - Notes on Portraiture

  1. 1. home page objectives and overview: unit 2 this project is intended to help you understand how to represent each of the four facial features (eyes, ears, nose, and lips) have an expressiveness and proportion all on their own. 1. please take notes on each page (including the vocab!) 2. please complete the practice activity. next page • portraiture: a physical likeness of a person and a psychological representation of that person (self portrait applies this to the artist him/herself) • expression: the quality or power of displaying or representing an attitude or emotion • feature: a prominent or conspicuous part or characteristic • foreshortening: representing objects/models in space using perspective (objects closer to the viewer appear larger and recede into space)
  2. 2. landscapes An Article about Chuck Close: Chuck Close was born in Monroe, Wisconsin, in 1940. Close began taking art lessons as a child and at age 14 saw an exhibition of Jackson Pollock's abstract paintings, which helped inspire him to become a painter. Close attended graduate school at Yale University, and received an MFA in 1964. After earning his graduate degree, he gradually rejected the elements of Abstract Expressionism that had initially characterized his work. Close's first solo exhibition included a series of enormous black-and-white portraits that he had painstakingly transformed from small photographs to colossal paintings. To make his paintings, Close superimposed a grid on the photograph and then transferred a proportional grid to his gigantic canvases. He then applied acrylic paint with an airbrush and scraped off the excess with a razor blade to duplicate the exact shadings of each grid in the photo. It is important to note that none of Close's images are created digitally or photo-mechanically. Close’s paintings are labor intensive and time consuming, and his prints are more so. While a painting can occupy Close for many months, it is not unusual for one print to take upward of two years to complete. In 1988 a spinal blood clot left Close almost completely paralyzed and confined to a wheelchair. A brush-holding device strapped to his wrist and forearm, however, allowed him to continue working. In the 1990s he replaced the minute detail of his earlier paintings with a grid of tiles daubed with colorful elliptical and ovoid shapes. Viewed up close, each tile was in itself an abstract painting; when seen from a distance, the tiles came together to form a dynamic deconstruction of the human face. From Chuck Close Biography, article from BigraphyBase, www.biographybase.com and www.chuckclose.coe.uh.edu • portraiture: a physical likeness of a person and a psychological representation of that person (self portrait applies this to the artist him/herself) • expression: the quality or power of displaying or representing an attitude or emotion • feature: a prominent or conspicuous part or characteristic • foreshortening: representing objects/models in space using perspective (objects closer to the viewer appear larger and recede into space)
  3. 3. evolution of landscapes Facial Porportion • Just as we studied proportion and placement in landscape painting, similar rules and guidelines help us master the Human Face. • Perhaps the most emotional and important subject matter represented in art – the human face embodies our ideas of persona, expression, attitude and characteristic. • This is why it is so difficult and so challenging to obtain a “likeness of a person.” Practicing the proportion of the ideal human face will help you become versatile in your skills as artist and ultimately allow you to become successful as a portrait artist. • portraiture: a physical likeness of a person and a psychological representation of that person (self portrait applies this to the artist him/herself) • expression: the quality or power of displaying or representing an attitude or emotion • feature: a prominent or conspicuous part or characteristic • foreshortening: representing objects/models in space using perspective (objects closer to the viewer appear larger and recede into space)
  4. 4. why is it important? understanding the human face Drawing Faces is Simply Drawing Shapes 1. Like drawing a landscape, the individual facial features can be drawn using basic forms. • The eye is based on the sphere • The nose is based on the sphere and cylinder • The lips are based on ovoids (oval-shaped spheres) • The ears are based on interconnecting cylinders 2. Draw the below faces based on shapes: • portraiture: a physical likeness of a person and a psychological representation of that person (self portrait applies this to the artist him/herself) • expression: the quality or power of displaying or representing an attitude or emotion • feature: a prominent or conspicuous part or characteristic • foreshortening: representing objects/models in space using perspective (objects closer to the viewer appear larger and recede into space)

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