Dli Part 1

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Dli Part 1

  1. 2. <ul><li>Defense Language Institute – Foreign Language Center , ( DLIFLC) </li></ul><ul><li>Best and Largest Foreign Language School in the world </li></ul><ul><li>Presidio of Monterey on the central coast of California </li></ul><ul><li>The Army offers students the chance to learn a useful foreign language </li></ul><ul><li>Earn an Associates Degree, while being paid </li></ul>
  2. 3. Army students go to the 229 th Military Intelligence Battalion. The 229 th ’s Companies are grouped by languages.
  3. 4. The DLI is in one of the most popular tourist areas of the USA, and is just 2 hours south of San Francisco.
  4. 5. You can earn an Associates Degree while learning a foreign language <ul><li>The DLIFLC falls under the jurisdiction of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC) of the Western Association of Schools as a specialized post secondary institution. DLIFLC students may obtain an Associate of Arts degree through the joint DLIFLC-Monterey Peninsula College degree program. For more information about this call (831) 242-5825. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Some DLI students attend Monterey Peninsula College or other local colleges off duty, or CLEP classes, so that they can receive their Associates Degree when they receive their language diploma.
  6. 7. Amy completed her language course while also earning her Associates Degree on the side!
  7. 8. <ul><li>Languages in most demand </li></ul><ul><li>Mandarin Chinese (18 months) </li></ul><ul><li>Arabic (18 months) </li></ul><ul><li>Korean (18 months) </li></ul><ul><li>Persian Farsi (12 months) </li></ul>
  8. 9. DLI also teaches… Hebrew Dari German Serian-Croatian Russian Vietnamese Thai Tagalog Japanese Spanish French Italian Portuguese It costs the government between $80,000 to $120,000 to train a student at DLI
  9. 10. Why does the Army do this??? DLI Graduates are in very high demand National Security Agency Drug Enforcement Agency Federal Bureau of Investigation Central Intelligence Agency Defense Intelligence Agency State Department Defense Department Civilian Corporations U.S. Customs
  10. 11. Usually after learning their languages, students will learn to do their various jobs at Fort Huachuca, Arizona.
  11. 12. <ul><li>Two Military Occupational Specialties, or MOSs, in great demand right now are: </li></ul><ul><li>98G Cryptologic Linguists </li></ul><ul><li>97E Human Intelligence Collectors </li></ul>
  12. 13. <ul><li>The Cryptologic Linguist, or 98G is primarily responsible for performing and supervising the detection, acquisition, location and identification of foreign communications using signals equipment. Some of your duties as a Cryptologic Linguist may include: </li></ul><ul><li>Translating, transcribing or producing summaries of foreign language transmissions in English/target languages </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying languages spoken in an assigned geographic area </li></ul><ul><li>Scanning written foreign language material for key words and indictors </li></ul><ul><li>Providing records of foreign intercepted communications </li></ul><ul><li>Operating communication equipment for SIGINT tasking, reporting and coordination </li></ul><ul><li>Translating written and spoken foreign language material to and from English, making sure to preserve the original meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Questioning prisoners of war, enemy deserters and civilian informers in their native languages </li></ul><ul><li>Recording foreign radio transmissions using sensitive communications equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Translating foreign books and articles describing foreign equipment and construction techniques </li></ul>
  13. 14. 98Gs get to play on some of these SIGINT toys in tactical units ….
  14. 15. … and often support Infantry or Armored Divisions . For example, soldiers of the 101 st Military Intelligence Battalion are the eyes and ears of the 1 st Infantry Division
  15. 16. In strategic assignments, 98Gs work in places like the National Security Agency in Fort Meade, Maryland…
  16. 17. … or in other NSA sites overseas like this former base in Bad Aibling, Germany
  17. 18. <ul><li>A Top Secret Security Clearance could be your key to an excellent job after your enlistment </li></ul>Corporations that work on projects for the government actively recruit people with security clearances You could also be offered jobs from government agencies such as the State Department, Customs, CIA, DEA, FBI, and NSA -- especially as a linguist
  18. 19. <ul><li>Don’t break the law. Avoid getting a record. </li></ul><ul><li>Stay away from drugs. If you used them, STOP ! </li></ul><ul><li>Manage your money wisely, don’t write bad </li></ul><ul><li>checks or earn bad credit reports. </li></ul><ul><li>If you did make mistakes in the past, be candid </li></ul><ul><li>about them. Do not lie about them in interviews. </li></ul><ul><li>Get the names, addresses and phone numbers of </li></ul><ul><li>friends that will speak well of you in references. </li></ul>
  19. 20. <ul><li>Having access to the correct information is absolutely necessary to plan for our national defense. Intelligence specialists, such as the 97E Human Intelligence Collector (HUMINT), are integral to providing Army personnel with information about enemy forces and potential battle areas. Intelligence specialists use aerial photographs, electronic monitoring and human observation in order to gather and study information that's required to design defense plans and tactics. The Human Intelligence Collector is primarily responsible for supervising and conducting information collection operations. Some of your duties as a Human Intelligence Collector may include: </li></ul><ul><li>Assisting in the screening of HUMINT sources and documents </li></ul><ul><li>Conducting debriefings and interrogations of HUMINT sources in English and -foreign languages- </li></ul><ul><li>Translating written foreign material and captured documents into English </li></ul><ul><li>Preparing and editing appropriate intelligence and administrative reports </li></ul><ul><li>Utilizing CI/HUMINT reporting and communications equipment </li></ul>
  20. 21. 97E Human Intelligence Collectors spearheaded the efforts to capture Saddam Hussein
  21. 22. This SGT worked as a 98G in Central and South America
  22. 23. Not all students learn a language to be in Military Intelligence…
  23. 24. Serbian-Croatian class SC00303 graduated after 46 weeks in early 2004
  24. 25. Fred (in the middle) was given a special cultural award by his teachers. On his own time, he read over a dozen books about his language region.
  25. 26. Tony received an Army Acheivement Medal for outstanding academic effort and for tutoring other students!
  26. 27. <ul><li>The fact that you finished your DLI language course doesn’t mean that that is all the language training there is. </li></ul><ul><li>Most Army units require their linguists to practice their language skills a few hours a week in some type of a language library. Units often have periodic local language refresher courses, or send linguists on temporary duty for 6-8 weeks to the Foreign Language Training Center Europe (FLTCE) at the foot of the Bavarian Alps in Garmisch-Partenkirschen. </li></ul><ul><li>FLTCE is right in the middle of Germany’s best tourist areas, 5 minutes from the Austrian border. </li></ul>
  27. 30. <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul><ul><li>Please keep questions to me related to the DLI or about my own Army experiences. </li></ul><ul><li>The recruiter with me can answer your general Army questions about benefits for enlisting, pay bonuses, Delayed Entry Programs, single-parent issues, college loan repayments, service requirements, et cetera. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn more about the DLI at the following websites: </li></ul><ul><li>www. dliflc.edu and www. monterey.army.mil </li></ul>

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