Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Disaster Planning for Libraries in Montana

Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 18 Ad
1 of 18 Ad

Disaster Planning for Libraries in Montana

Download to read offline

This session takes the knowledge gained by library staff in reacting to the COVID-19 pandemic and directs those lessons learned into improving planning for any type of disaster. Disaster planning is an important administrative function for boards and library staff because it helps the libary to not only mitigate damage or injury at the library, but it clearly defines the role of the library as an essential second responder service agency for the community to improve outcomes for everyone. Libraries may play a critical role in the initial response to a disaster sometimes, but they will always be critical to the recovery phase for their community.

Find the handouts for this presentation here: https://mslservices.mt.gov/ASPeN/Events/Event_Detail.aspx?Event_ID=19820

Attendees will learn about the incident response system that is in place in communities, regions and the nation, and explore how the assets of their library may enhance that response. The presentation will also explore what planning libraries should have in place to keep staff and patrons safe during and following a disaster, how to mitigage damage to collections and facilities, and strategies for providing for continuation/restoration of services. A pocket-sized response plan will be created so that all libraries attending will be ready for when a disaster strikes again.

This session takes the knowledge gained by library staff in reacting to the COVID-19 pandemic and directs those lessons learned into improving planning for any type of disaster. Disaster planning is an important administrative function for boards and library staff because it helps the libary to not only mitigate damage or injury at the library, but it clearly defines the role of the library as an essential second responder service agency for the community to improve outcomes for everyone. Libraries may play a critical role in the initial response to a disaster sometimes, but they will always be critical to the recovery phase for their community.

Find the handouts for this presentation here: https://mslservices.mt.gov/ASPeN/Events/Event_Detail.aspx?Event_ID=19820

Attendees will learn about the incident response system that is in place in communities, regions and the nation, and explore how the assets of their library may enhance that response. The presentation will also explore what planning libraries should have in place to keep staff and patrons safe during and following a disaster, how to mitigage damage to collections and facilities, and strategies for providing for continuation/restoration of services. A pocket-sized response plan will be created so that all libraries attending will be ready for when a disaster strikes again.

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Similar to Disaster Planning for Libraries in Montana (20)

More from Montana State Library (20)

Advertisement

Disaster Planning for Libraries in Montana

  1. 1. Disaster Preparedness for Montana Libraries Adapted from a presentation by: Dan Wilson Assoc. Dir. Collections & Library Services Claude Moore Health Sciences Library University of Virginia Reynold’s Fire, Glacier National Park 2015: Jo Flick Joann Fick, CE Coordinator May 15, 2021
  2. 2. Today • Take account of what we’ve learned from COVID • Identify likely disasters that will impact library services • Consider the role of the library in response & recovery • Assess preparedness • Take specific steps from what we know to be better prepared – from response to recovery
  3. 3. Photo: CDC
  4. 4. Source: National Park Service 2017 Earthquake!
  5. 5. Source: Climate Change and the U.S. Energy Sector: Regional Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions, DOE 2015
  6. 6. Photo credit: Northwestern Energy
  7. 7. Lac Megantic, Quebec, 2013 Transportation Safety Board, CA
  8. 8. EMP Cheyenne Mountain Complex
  9. 9. Koppel asks us to imagine a blackout that could last months – where millions of Americans over several states are without running water, refrigeration, light, and a dwindling supply of food and medical supplies. A blackout could shutdown banks, challenge the police as they’ve never been before, and lead to widespread looting. –Forbes, 020716
  10. 10. What’s a Library To Do?
  11. 11. 1. We have a collection of useful print materials available in the event of a long- term power outage. 2. We maintain a response station (first aid kit, flashlights, bullhorn) in a known location. 3. We have thought out our communications strategy to include traditional and social media, and worst-case scenario (i.e., all communication channels are down). 4. We perform at least two drills per year for unplanned incidents and at least one tabletop exercise per year. 5. In the past five years, we have discussed salvage & recovery issues with a preservationist or salvage company (e.g. Munters, Belfor, or BMS) 6. We meet with emergency responders at least once every two years to review our response procedures. We have identified shelter-in-place locations. 7. We have a disaster team for keeping our core services available if the library is closed due to a major service disruption that convenes soon after a service disruption for an After Action Review (AAR). 8. Members of our library staff are aware of the importance of home preparedness. 9. We are familiar with the Stafford Act and have a relocation strategy. 10. We have mutual aid agreements with other libraries for disaster related assistance. How Prepared is Your Library?
  12. 12. 1. Charging Station: Emergency power is available at our library for patrons to charge devices following a major power disruption. 2.Meeting Place: Emergency planners/responders use our space for meetings and training. 3.Disaster Literacy: We work with our Public Health Department on projects such as helping to improve Disaster Literacy in our community. 4.Point of Coordination: Following a disaster, the library is designated as space for actions such as coordinating disaster volunteers or reuniting families. 5.Distribution Site: Our library is a designated site for water/clothing distribution. 6.Warming/Cooling Site: We flex our hours to accommodate the needs of our community following a disaster. 7.Education Site: We maintain a directory of individuals in our community who can provide programming on sustainability. 8.Sense of Normalcy: Our community views our library as a place to get a sense of normalcy following a disaster. 9.POD Site: Our library is designated as a point of distribution (POD) site in the event of a need for mass inoculations. 10. Mobile Response: We are willing to deploy our bookmobile to help our community after a major disaster. Roles for Libraries
  13. 13. 1. Emergency power is available at our library for patrons to charge devices following a major power disruption. 2.Emergency planners/responders use our space for meetings and training. 3.We work with our Public Health Department on projects such as helping to improve Disaster Literacy in our community. 4.Following a disaster, the library is designated as space for actions such as coordinating disaster volunteers or reuniting families. 5.Our library is a designated site for water/clothing/food distribution. 6.We flex our hours to accommodate the needs of our community following a disaster. 7.We maintain a directory of individuals in our community who can provide programming on sustainability. 8.Our community views our library as a place to get a sense of normalcy following a disaster. 9.Our library is designated as a point of distribution (POD) site in the event of a need for mass inoculations. 10. We are willing to deploy our bookmobile or other library vehicles to help our community after a major disaster. Are You Reaching Out to Emergency Planners?
  14. 14. Get Started • Form an emergency preparedness team • Reach out to emergency planners • Complete one page disaster plan • Support a culture of preparedness • Download the App
  15. 15. Questions? Joann Flick – CE Coordinator jflick@mt.gov

Editor's Notes

  • A pandemic is a type of natural disaster – we’ve all experienced this in the past year. Perhaps, you could consider a bioterrorism attack as a similar situation. Montana is at the headwaters of much of the nation’s surface water supplies – the Missouri and

    Terrorism is a constant threat and though we may have some relief because most terrorism targets large city centers for the greatest panic and economic destruction, we have seen terrorists target national treasures such as archeological sites. Our national parks are a potential target too.

    What did you learn from the library’s response to COVID? When it happened 14 months ago, what adjustments did you have to make, what mistakes did you make? Maybe you don’t think you learned anything, but I’m sure, as a group, we’ve got a lot of wisdom to share. Take a few minutes to discuss with a partner just what you learned, what you don’t want to forget for next time so you’ll be better prepared. Pick one or two things to share with the group when we come back together.
  • What is our risk for an earthquake disaster? This map shows Yellowstone’s earthquake activity in 2017. We live in a very seismically active area.

    In fact, the 1959 Earthquake at Hebgen Lake was one of the largest ever recorded in the US – claiming at least 27 lives in a landslide that dammed the Madison River and formed Quake Lake. Frank’s Slide at Turtle Mountain near Crowsnest Pass just north of us in Alberta claimed over 90 lives in 1903. And…then, there’s Yellowstone – the super volcano.

    What other types of disasters might we be victims of here in Montana? Any ideas?
  • WILDFIRE!

    We don’t know yet what our wildfire season will be like this year, but Montana, along with most of the south and west are experiencing increased wildfires. Many of you have lived through a fire event, if not directly, certainly nearby or you’ve experienced smoke events. Just a week ago, there were 2 deaths associated with a smoke event that caused a multi-vehicle crash near Conrad, Montana

    We tend to plan for fire escape from our building, but, what if our community is experiencing a wildfire, but the library is not directly impacted? Let’s ask Mark from the Bitterrroot Library – he knows. Libraries can be vital at these times to the community response.
  • Beyond terrorism, there are other dangerous man-made disasters lurking… like an industrial spill… for which Montana has a significant risk. All kinds of lethal things travel through our state in trucks or on trains…or pipelines. With a leak or a spill, whole towns could require immediate evacuation. This map just shows the natural gas pipeline systems in Montana.
  • Or what about an explosion?

    This is the tourist town of Lac Megantic, QC in the summer of 2013 after a rail cars containing crude oil were not braked properly for the grade overnight. When the engine was shut down so the engineer could get some required rest, the hydraulic brakes loosened, the handset brakes failed and the consist rolled down a hill into town where the oil cars derailed and exploded. 47 people died and the downtown was obliterated.
  • How about an electromagnetic burst? Foreign enemies of the US could disrupt power with a device detonated over our country. We’ve recently experienced cyber attacks (try to get gas in Virginia this weekend) that have impacted essential services. Just a strain on the power grid caused by storms in Texas put homes in the dark for weeks.
  • An even larger scale failure of our power grid is not unlikely. If you want to read a well-researched account of our very real risk…read Ted Koppel’s book.

    This would make a great read for a library-led discussion group, btw. You could invite your local emergency planners.

    And, that’s a nice segue into thinking about what libraries can do to help communities be resilient in the time of a disaster.
  • Use the chat to list a few assets that your library has that could benefit your community during a disaster. I’ll suggest a classic – BOOKS. If there is no power or Internet for an extended period of time, local doctors would be glad to know that your library has a copy of some common reference works that are mostly accessed via an app these days. You might consider keeping a small collection of books that would provide essential info after an apocalypse, just in case. What else?
  • We can always improve our preparedness…but how prepared are you, RIGHT NOW?

    Let’s take a test… take a look at these 10 questions for your library… no one expects a library to have all 10 items prepared. But, make a mental note of the level of your library’s preparedness RIGHT NOW.
  • And…here are some real life things that libraries have done recently when disaster has struck.
  • Libraries can work with emergency planners as a resource. When you meet with them, bring a list of assets with you. Libraries are often considered “second responders” that can help move a community quickly into recovery.
  • Emergency Planners in our communities, our state, and our nation are planning for and responding to disasters all the time. You don’t have to do this work alone – you should do it in collaboration with others in your community. Emergency planners use an ALL HAZARDS approach to planning. They do this because it’s impossible to know the type of disaster that will happen next. So, we plan for any disaster…we will always need to communicate, to assess risk, to know our resources and assets to help with recovery. Every disaster is different, no two floods are the same.

    This is the disaster cycle – for COVID-19, we are well into the response and maybe even entering the recovery phase. For the upcoming wildfire season, we’re preparing or mitigating. Every time we make a turn around this cycle, our preparedness for the next disaster should improve.
  • This one-page template disaster plan folds neatly into about a credit-card size – every member of your library staff could have this in their wallet or purse next week. It covers the minimum basics to keep library staff, patrons, and collections safe. It’s designed to use at the spur of the moment – as a reference tool and guide.
  • Here’s the back side – with a floor plan that shows where critical items are and safe places to shelter-in-place. A template for creating your own plan is posted with this event in the ASPeN events calendar. I got a call on a Sunday at the start of the COVID shutdowns in Montana. A library director called me to say he had just pulled his out of his wallet so that he could call staff, the security and cleaning crew for his library and tell them all to go home and stay home. Maybe, it saved a life that day.
  • So, what can you do right now? Have a safety team at your library. Make a date with your emergency planner. Plan a library event for September (Preparedness Month), October (Fire Prevention Month) or the Shakeout held the 3rd Thursday of October and takes just one minute. Share a safety/awareness tip at every staff meeting, encourage staff to practice preparedness at home, check and update your library’s first aid kit, add a blanket and flashlight at the information desk, check your supply of batteries, purchase a solar charger, replenish your mask supplies, put a roll of duck tape into an interior room where you can wait out a haz mat event, check your fire extinguishers, add one to your home or car.

    Say what you plan to do next week in the chat.

    And… right now… download the FEMA App.
  • Anyone who wants to work with me to create your pocket response plan, let me know and I will schedule a meet-up in a couple weeks, I need to update the State Library’s plan anyway. We can work on them together.

×