Education - Manchester University

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Education - Manchester University

  1. 1. Reaching the Hard to Hear Laura (Mole) Chapman
  2. 2. Welcome <ul><li>Without certain groups represented in the room, we miss out on the voices we need to hear in order to change. </li></ul>
  3. 3. From mindscapes to landscapes <ul><li>We would be foolish to assume that it’s easy to achieve a fairer society. </li></ul><ul><li>If it was easy we would have cracked it, and we would all live in an equitable world. </li></ul><ul><li>It is not. </li></ul><ul><li>We have not. </li></ul><ul><li>We do not. </li></ul><ul><li>Think! </li></ul>
  4. 4. Flowerboxes or landscaping?
  5. 5. Mainstream is not enough <ul><li>Questioning ideology - whose standards? </li></ul><ul><li>Transformation - improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Profound change means bringing in bulldozers … </li></ul><ul><li>Special places or special education? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Perceived Inequality High Inequality Low social mobility Deprivation and poverty Deprivation and poverty Low Inequality High social mobility The wider the perceived inequality - the unhealthier the community <ul><ul><ul><li>“ The first thing to recognise is that we are dealing with the effects of relative rather than absolute deprivation or poverty” Fullan </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Inequality and Wellbeing <ul><li>Inequality affects all of society </li></ul><ul><li>Affluenza - Treadmill culture </li></ul><ul><li>Individualism - materialism culture </li></ul><ul><li>Education Hierarchy - target culture </li></ul><ul><li>Wilkinson, Layard and Oliver </li></ul>
  8. 8. Factors that promote wellbeing Economic Well-being Contribution Enjoy and achieve Health Safety Flourishing Personal Capacity Equality: Social, culture Environment
  9. 9. Equality & Diversity: <ul><li>Equality </li></ul><ul><li>Equal treatment for all: The availability of the same rights, position, and status to all people, regardless of gender, sexual preference, age, race, ethnicity, ability or religion. All individuals need to have equal choices and opportunities regardless of their ability. </li></ul><ul><li>Diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding that each individual is unique, respecting of differences. 
A safe, positive, and nurturing environment; where people go beyond tolerance to embracing and celebrating the dimensions contained within each person. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Population change
  11. 11. Reflective practice: strategies for change <ul><li>Bradford Play Partnership Inclusion Statement: </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Inclusion is a process of identifying and breaking down barriers which can be environmental, attitudinal and institutional. This process eliminates discrimination thus providing all children and young people with equal access to play.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Play Partnership 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Is an ongoing process of reviewing and developing practice in order to adjust and celebrate diversity. It is the journey not the destination!” </li></ul><ul><li>(EQuality Training 2006) </li></ul>
  12. 12. The Facts <ul><li>Visually impaired people are four times more likely to be verbally and physically abused than sighted people </li></ul><ul><li>People with mental health issues are 11 times more likely to be victimised </li></ul><ul><li>90% of adults with a learning difficulty report being 'bullied'. </li></ul>Scope 2008
  13. 13. Equity <ul><li>The principle of equality has to be reinforced and extended by the practice of equity. </li></ul><ul><li>Three broad principles about the nature of social justice: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equality: every human being has an absolute and equal right to common dignity and parity of esteem and entitlement to access the benefits of society on equal terms. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equity: every human being has a right to benefit from the outcomes of society on the basis of fairness and according to need. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social justice: justice requires deliberate and specific intervention to secure equality and equity. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(West-Burnham & Chapman 2009) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Defining wellbeing <ul><li>Wellbeing is more than absence of pain </li></ul><ul><li>Deeper and longer-lasting than pleasure - aspiration and potential </li></ul><ul><li>A measure for wellbeing </li></ul><ul><li>Specific implications for flourishing </li></ul><ul><li>Wellbeing recognises growth and development </li></ul><ul><li>Prioritising wellbeing is fundamental to achieving equity </li></ul><ul><li>Seligman’s 3 lives = not an empty life </li></ul>
  15. 15. The Medical Model of disability <ul><li>Medical approach to the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>Defined by non-disabled professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Equated to illness in terms of research and findings. </li></ul><ul><li>Care and benefits have been awarded to compensate for personal tragedy. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Medical Model thinking Bad image No qualifications Expensive Nothing to bring Victims Only know about disability Networks Difficult behaviour The impairment is the focus The person is perceived as faulty
  17. 17. The Social Model of disability <ul><li>The problem owned by the whole community. </li></ul><ul><li>It defines disability in terms barriers, attitudinal, structural and systemic. </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledges the oppression, and need for action. </li></ul><ul><li>It recognises disabled people’s leadership in finding a solution. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Social Model thinking Disabled people as active members of the community Great P.R expertise Challenges tolerance Diverse skills Social skills Does it differently Feelings Assessment panels
  19. 19. Social model thinking Attitudes, the environment & systems are a problem We participate in change for equality We have an individual & a collective responsibility we are allowed to do what is right for ourselves we have a positive image and are proud of who we are we have expertise and might wish to take risks we are all equal members of the community
  20. 20. Culture Change <ul><ul><li>Compliance -> Commitment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tolerance -> Acceptance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mindscape (me) -> Landscape (us) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Single/Other -> Diverse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deficits -> Assets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Barriers -> Boundaries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rigid Rules -> Flexible Values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve -> Transform </li></ul></ul>EQuality training
  21. 21. Equity and Commitment <ul><li>The principle of equality has to be reinforced and extended by the practice of equity. Three broad principles about the nature of social justice: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equality: every human being has an absolute and equal right to common dignity and parity of esteem and entitlement to access the benefits of society on equal terms. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Equity: every human being has a right to benefit from the outcomes of society on the basis of fairness and according to need. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership activity require ethical practice: deliberate and specific intervention to secure equality and equity. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li> (West-Burnham & Chapman 2010) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Reflective Practice <ul><li>Enlightenment ( understanding ) </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding why things have come to be as they are in terms of frustrating self’s realisation of desirable practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Empowerment </li></ul><ul><li>Creating the necessary conditions within self whereby action to realize desirable practice can be undertaken. </li></ul><ul><li>Emancipation ( transformation ) </li></ul><ul><li>A stable shift in practice congruent with the realisation of desirable practice </li></ul>
  23. 23. Reflective Practice Plan Do Review What do you know? What can we learn? What has changed?
  24. 24. Plan Do Review New ideas New practice New outcomes Reflective Practice
  25. 25. Seeking Congruence <ul><li>Head </li></ul><ul><li>Theory, vision, understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Heart </li></ul><ul><li>Feeling, reflection, response </li></ul><ul><li>Hand </li></ul><ul><li>Action, practice, learning </li></ul>
  26. 26. From Compliance to Commitment: the implications of ethical practice <ul><li>How far do your daily activities translate the aspirations of vision into ethical practice? </li></ul><ul><li>To what extent do strategies for monitoring, reviewing and evaluating practice focus on a commitment to equity? </li></ul><ul><li>How might the wider community be involved in creating the vision? </li></ul>
  27. 27. Defining happiness <ul><li>Flourishing is more than absence of pain or suffering. </li></ul><ul><li>Not to be confused with pleasure. </li></ul><ul><li>A measure for wellbeing and lifechances. </li></ul><ul><li>Specific implications for development. </li></ul><ul><li>Positive: permanent and pervasive. </li></ul><ul><li>3 lives = not an empty life </li></ul><ul><li>Layard, Seligman, and Deiner </li></ul>
  28. 28. ‘ The pleasant life’ <ul><li>Broaden-and-Build </li></ul><ul><ul><li>- Positive emotions and feelings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexible, creative and clearer thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Skills and interest </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Plasticity of intelligence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ Opportunity cost’ </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Fredrickson </li></ul>
  29. 29. Intelligence portfolio
  30. 30. ‘ The pleasant life’ <ul><li>Choice & option </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Free play and creativity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choice and control </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resilience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive emotion = positive feelings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtuous cycle </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. ‘ The good life’ <ul><li>Barriers to engagement and boundaries for safety </li></ul><ul><li>Need for change or complexity </li></ul><ul><li>(Mike) Csíkszentmihályi - ‘Flow’ </li></ul><ul><li>Risk not hazard </li></ul><ul><li>The right choice to suit interest </li></ul>
  32. 32. ‘ The Meaningful Life’ Core purpose <ul><li>People who drift become unhappy </li></ul><ul><li>No moral or value judgement </li></ul><ul><li>Happiness is a skill - time </li></ul><ul><li>Other people’s experience and Personal feelings </li></ul>
  33. 33. Inclusive Practice <ul><li>A commitment to ethical practice </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrate growth and effort </li></ul><ul><li>A change in culture: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture of belonging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture of acceptance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture of possibility </li></ul></ul>EQuality training
  34. 34. The pleasant life - participation <ul><li>Broaden-and-build (Fredrickson): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive feelings and emotions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexible, creative and clearer thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Development of skill </li></ul><ul><li>Choice & option </li></ul><ul><ul><li>control </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resilience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Positive emotion = positive feelings </li></ul></ul>
  35. 35. Meaningful relationships <ul><li>Contradicts: </li></ul><ul><li>Marginalisation </li></ul><ul><li>Negative attitudes </li></ul><ul><li>Alienation and exclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Stereotypes and prejudice </li></ul><ul><li>Promotes : </li></ul><ul><li>Safety and Belonging </li></ul><ul><li>Information Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Liberation </li></ul><ul><li>Capacity and resilience </li></ul>
  36. 37. The Good Life - Engagement <ul><li>Balance – Barriers and Boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>Level of engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Need for change or complexity </li></ul><ul><li>Flow </li></ul><ul><li>Risk not hazard </li></ul><ul><li>Unlike pleasure, lack of feeling </li></ul>
  37. 38. Meaningful Life - contribution <ul><li>Positive purpose and deeper belief </li></ul><ul><li>People who drift become unhappy </li></ul><ul><li>No moral or value judgement </li></ul><ul><li>Happiness is a skill so needs time </li></ul><ul><li>Other people’ experience and personal feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Present quality </li></ul><ul><li>Value based purpose </li></ul>
  38. 39. Summary <ul><li>To enable the development of strategies to increase wellbeing strategies may include the following aspects: </li></ul><ul><li>Participation: Friendships and pleasant activity </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement: Association with other young people and adults </li></ul><ul><li>Meaning: from community activity to enrich life and add to sustainability </li></ul>
  39. 40. Implications for personal and shared practice? <ul><li>Personal meaning </li></ul><ul><li>What do I understand by inequality? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I promote wellbeing and health and happiness? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I strengthen my own understanding? </li></ul><ul><li>How do I enable others to grow? </li></ul><ul><li>What can I do to take more responsibility? </li></ul><ul><li>Shared understanding </li></ul><ul><li>How do we work together? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we value others? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we address common language? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we enable our children? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we involve parents and other groups? </li></ul><ul><li>How do we share action? </li></ul>

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