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Internship report

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Internship report

  1. 1. EEN399i (Field): Internship Summer 13-14 at Sawa Lake Electromechanical Internship Report Authored By: Mohammed Ali Sadi —— 1003857 * * Faculty Supervisor: Dr. Muhammad Akmal July 24, 2014 1
  2. 2. Contents 1 Internship data 3 2 Company Information 4 2.1 Business Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.2 Service targets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.3 Primary Customers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 Organizational Chart 4 4 Engineers’ role in the company 4 5 Internship activities 5 6 Weekly schedule outline 6 6.1 week 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6.2 Week 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6.3 Week 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 6.4 Week 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6.5 Week 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6.6 Week 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6.7 RTU: Remote Terminal Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6.8 TRM and QRM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6.8.1 TRM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 6.8.2 QRM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.9 Switchgears and relays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.10 EasyPower 9.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 6.10.1 Short Circuit Analyses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 6.10.2 Relay settings, coordination and graphs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 6.11 Site visit in the first week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 6.12 Second site visit in the second week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 6.13 Pictorial representations of the second site visit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 6.14 Cable testing machinery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 6.15 Streaming of security camera over the internet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 6.15.1 Things involved in port forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 6.16 Third site visit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 7 Assessment of the internship 48 7.1 skills gained from the internship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 7.2 How will this internship effect future career plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 7.3 How were internship activities different from classroom knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 8 Conclusion and acknowledgement 50 List of Figures 1 Organizational chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 The single line diagram that we drew on easy power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3 The short circuit fault currents in the single line diagram that we drew on easy power . . . . 10 4 The LV momentary fault report table generated on Easy Power 9.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5 The HV momentary fault report table generated on Easy Power 9.5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 6 The dialogue box for relay setting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 7 the relay time coordination curve for bus 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 8 the relay time coordination curve for the second bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 2
  3. 3. 9 the relay time coordination curve for the third bus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 10 the TCC Coordination report for bus 1 R-1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 11 the TCC Coordination report for bus 3 R-3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 12 Site visit: Breakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 13 Site visit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 14 site visit: Transformer in the W-10 Substation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 15 site visit: Transformer data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 16 site visit: Name-plate details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 17 site visit: The Insulation resistance test table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 18 site visit: The winding resistance test table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 19 site visit: The turns ratio test table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 20 The nameplate of the transformer at Yas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 21 The connection configuration of the transformer at Yas Mall site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 22 The device for vector group value computation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 23 The thick HV side cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 24 The 3 phases denoted as RYB lodged in the HV side of the transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 25 The Megger device that is used to carry out the insulation resistance test . . . . . . . . . . . 38 26 The Cable testing device used by Sawa Lake for cable testing purposes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 27 Instructions on the cabinet door . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 28 Panel set up on the TRM transformer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 29 Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 30 the details of the equipment on the nameplate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 31 the earth fault indicator panel. This doesn’t have a response to the fault, it only indicates if there is on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 32 some more breaker wirings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 List of Tables 1 Internship data • Intern name: Mohammed Ali Sadi • Date of start of internship: 15th June 2014 • Date of end of internship: 24th July 2014 • Number of days of Internship: 30 • Type of internship: Engineering • Name of company: Sawa Lake Electromechanical Dr. Muhammad Akmal 3
  4. 4. 2 Company Information Sawa Lake Electromechanical is a company that deals with both electrical and mechanical services for important and notable clients. It has been established since 1999. This company is more than just a normal one providing such services. The engineers and employees here see to it that the growth is attained in the country with regards to this important sector. Sawa Lake makes sure that quality services are provided to the necessary clients to meet their requirements in the best possible way [1]. 2.1 Business Structure In technical terms, Sawa Lake happens to be a Limited Liabilities Company. Profit-sharing is a norm among the owners of the firm as per the investment of each individual party. Engineer Hassan Sheikhly is the General Manager of the company who is responsible to supervise all the services and operations in their entirety throughout. Also, there is Engineer Alaa who is the Projects Manager. He makes designations of appropriate people to proper places. 2.2 Service targets Since the company is basically for installation and commissioning of equipment related to the High voltage and Low voltage power at residential and commercial units, contracts are awarded to this company for various such units like villas or malls where testing/commissioning of equipment like transformers is done. The company also deals with clients that require replacement and maintenance of RTU (Remote Terminal Unit) and RMU (Ring Main Unit), switchgears, relays, Incomer control, DMS and other HV and LV systems. 2.3 Primary Customers The primary customers are the companies with which Sawa Lake is bind to via contracts. These contracts are for different things like jointing of cables, their testing, installation of equipment and their commissioning, RTU and DMS related maintenance. Some of the companies that are customers of Sawa Lake include Tabreed to which cables are supplied, Autochim, and Cityscape. Sawa Lake also has a license and the official permit to work from ADDC, making ADDC also a client for Sawa Lake. 3 Organizational Chart 4 Engineers’ role in the company The engineers and people holding technical expertise in the company are responsible for various tasks. Of them, some are: • Testing and installation of units like TRM and QRM (Tri Ring Main and Quad Ring Main respectively) and make proper quality assurance estimations • commissioning and testing of DMS interfaces, switchegears and the likes. • Jointing, commissioning of HV cables and their testing • Installation and maintenance of additional distribution boxes, sub main distribution boxes, poles and light fittings units 4
  5. 5. Figure 1: Organizational chart • maintaining both HV and LV substations • Complete clearance with government entities like Abu Dhabi Distribution Company • Working on all sorts of operations related to the relays of different makes, types and kinds. • Analyses of relay parameters 5
  6. 6. 5 Weekly schedule outline 5.1 week 1 1. Engaged in research about RMUs (Ring Main Units), TRM (Tri Ring Main), and QRM (Quad Ring Main). 2. General Information about how RTUs (Remote terminal units) work. 3. W10 Khalidiyah Site Visit. 4. Feeder Pillars and Substation understanding and practical view. 5. Analyzing two previous company cases including AutoChim and Dhafir. 5.2 Week 2 1. Introduction to EasyPower. 2. Studying AutoCAD drawings from basic to complex systems provided by supervisor. 3. Using Easy Power to build High Voltage (HV) and Low Voltage (LV) systems 4. Yas Mall Site visit for transformer testing and commissioning. 5. Researching the theory behind the vector group test and developing the understanding. 6. Practical vector group test on the transformer. 7. Insulation Resistance Test and Polarization Index formulas and understanding. 8. practically finding out the insulation resistance using the Megger equipment. 9. Performing winding Resistance Test using the Megger’s transformer ohm meter on all three coils and all 5 taps options. 10. Finding out transformer winding ratios test using the Megger’s equipment and verifying it from the nameplate on the transformer. 5.3 Week 3 1. Using Easy Power to analyze the operation of relays. 2. Setting and configuring the relays on Easy Power for optimal simulation. 3. Generating Graphs Time-Current Curves (TCCs) to find the coordination values in case of fault for relays. 4. Generating different reports and understanding them. 5. Simulating the short circuit at different locations on the single line diagram and finding the fault currents at the fault buses. 6. Using short circuit analysis to set the protection relays and other protection equipment. 7. Generating reports of short circuit based on the analysis. 6
  7. 7. 5.4 Week 4 1. General research about ETAP software and how to obtain legal license. 2. Familiarization with Abu Dhabi Distribution Company (ADDC) rules and regulations regarding safety at sites and work places. 3. Connecting DVR to local network for local access using the static IP. 4. Getting insight into previous clients of the company. 5.5 Week 5 1. Theoretical understanding and research of VLF cable testing and Practical analyses of the equipment used. 2. Getting to know the official procedure for acquiring ADDC approval for competent person, site access, and other permissions. 3. Configuring the router to perform Port Forwarding so that the local IP packets can be accessed globally using the ISP provided IP address. 4. Making the router’s global IP static using the online services such as ddns and no-ip.com. 5.6 Week 6 1. ADNEC site visit for maintenance 2. Learning about maintenance 3. Concluding report 6 Internship Activities 6.1 RTU: Remote Terminal Unit Since the theoretical world is different than the real one, we realized there were a lot of undiscovered things in the field. One such thing we were advised to research about by the employees was the RTU or the Remote Terminal Unit. It is a computer based on micro-controller that is useful for interfacing a master- system to controls of electrical equipment in remote locations. In the case of power systems, there are different levels, pressures and temperatures of oil inside a transformer, all these have to be kept at certain levels for the transformer to work properly. There are sensors in the transformer to indicate if any irregularity takes place. These sensors sense and send the data acquired to the master system in the RTU. The RTU is connected also to the relays and switchgears that will work as per the command from the RTU. The RTU locates in which transformer at which remote location did the irregularity take place. Based on this, it commands that particular transformer’s control to switchgear or relay to come into action and essentially turn off the said equipment. 6.2 TRM and QRM 6.2.1 TRM Tri Ring Main or TRM is he kind of wiring/connection system in electrical power distribution system in which there are two incomer components as inputs and one transformer as an output. In this system, the placement of these 2 incomer/1 output transformer is in the configuration of a ring. That is, a 7
  8. 8. circular configuration. The combination is placed in the form of the ring at equal intervals and both ends can be connected to incomer supplies. The two incomer components are the input from the ADDC supply and it is still in the HV phase. From these incomers it is stepped down and goes via the transformer to different kinds of units and now it is in the LV stage because this voltage will now be consumed by residential and/or commercial units. A 2-incomer/1-output transformer combination can be added to this ring. In addition, if there is a fault in a part where this combination is placed, the advantage of ring main is that the particular point of fault can be isolated and maintenance can be done without problem as no interruptions would be made except at the affected point because the supply from both incomers is given to both ends of the ring. 6.2.2 QRM Quad ring main, this is the kind of configuration of power distribution where there are as usual, 2 incomers as input components coming from the rot supply from government entities and for the output, there are 2 transformers. This was also seen in the site visit. 6.3 Switchgears and relays On the very first day of our internship, we were given the concept of the use of switchgears and relays in power distribution systems. Switchgears and relays are electrical components used to maximize protection should any kind of fault or short circuit occur. Once a fault in a ring or a bus or any part of the distribution grid occurs, the switchgears/relays come into play and trip or simply, switch off the entire affected part of the circuit so that the effects of that particular fault do not act on the entire system. Also, in transformers, when the parameters like the level, temperature and pressure are said to vary greatly given their set values, the switchgears and relays come into action and trip the system. Circuit breakers are also used as one of the protective components. The purpose of which is to prevent the effects of too many faults at one time. The basic job of the breaker is to interrupt the current flow when a fault occurs. Unlike fuses, that have to be changed every time a fault causes it to melt, circuit breakers only have to be reset after the effects of fault have been properly diminished. The type of switchgears Sawa Lake employs in its operations on site are the the LUCY and PICOM ones. 6.4 EasyPower 9.5 This was one of the most important activity. We were instructed by the General Manager eng. Hassan Sheikhly to download and later on install this software called Easy Power in our laptops with acceptable means. Easy Power is a software in which a variety of things can be done and analyses can be made, reports be generated. It is a software that is similar to the one we had learned about in the theoretical studies which was the DIgSILENT Power Factory. In easy power, however, the options are more visible, user-friendly and the interface is also better. In Easy Power, certain component that are usually used in the power systems and distribution have their icons in the toolbox to the left of the screen in a column. These icons are of different types of circuit breakers, cables, transformers, buses to make busbars, relays and other protection devices. Single Line Diagrams can be conveniently and easily made on this software. With every component, double-clicking it will give the dialogue boxes to set the entire parameters related to that particular component. For instance, double clicking the bus will give the dialogue box that lets us set the base 8
  9. 9. voltage and all the related things. Double-clicking the transformer will generate a dialogue box that will let us set the parameters for the transformer like its MVA ratings and the winding ratio. A typical single line diagram was made by us interns as per the case file given to us by the secretary Ms Lynie Escober and the General Manager Engineer Hassan. 6.4.1 Short Circuit Analyses The below given single line diagram was drawn by us upon a similar drawing made on a similar software was given to us. The file that was given was basically of relay calculation and a part of it was related to the single line diagram. That was the one that we drew. For the cables, parameters like the cable length, the size have to be particularly set, for buses, the base voltage has to be set, for the transformers the windings, the ratings and the impedance to be set for only when these parameters are set according to the given specifications in the file given will the results be correct. This also means that if the parameters are set close to the set value, the result will be as close to the accurate one. Figure 2: The single line diagram that we drew on easy power As you can see in the above picture screenshot, the toolbox to the left of the screen gives a complete diagrammatic list of all the components used in the system. We used all of these to make a complplete single line diagram as seen in the above figure. We then used the Short circuit analysis as one of the analyses techniques given in the tab on top of the software. This creates probable short circuit faults in each bus to see the effects of it and then gives us the data that like the short circuit current that may have resulted as a result of that short circuit. 9
  10. 10. After selecting that, we clicked on the icon that meant it would make a quick illustrative interpretation of the short circuit. Figure 3: The short circuit fault currents in the single line diagram that we drew on easy power It was found from our results of this short circuit analyses that they were almost the same as the results of the short circuit analyses of the given case file. Easy Power also generated automatic reports for this short circuit analyses. 10
  11. 11. Figure 4: The LV momentary fault report table generated on Easy Power 9.5 11
  12. 12. Figure 5: The HV momentary fault report table generated on Easy Power 9.5 6.4.2 Relay settings, coordination and graphs While working with the software and the same single line diagram, we were also to do the relay coordination on Easy Power. Relay coordination required certain predefined user settings that are decided by users when the dialogue box is displayed. These settings are then entered there and we get the results. Since we have 3 main buses with cables involved, we get the time coordination curve for relay for these 3 buses. 12
  13. 13. Figure 6: The dialogue box for relay setting 13
  14. 14. Once we have made these, for every bus, we acquire the current time graph for each bus which has normal Easy Power cables. Time coordinaton curve for the first bus, thus, would be Figure 7: the relay time coordination curve for bus 1 14
  15. 15. Relay coordination curve for the second bus: Figure 8: the relay time coordination curve for the second bus Relay coordination curve for the third bus: 15
  16. 16. Figure 9: the relay time coordination curve for the third bus 16
  17. 17. After we had done this, we generated reports for the relay coordination calculations on Easy Power. Some of these coordination reports were as follows. The generated reports below are of the buses R-1 and R-3 in our single line diagram. Figure 10: the TCC Coordination report for bus 1 R-1 17
  18. 18. Figure 11: the TCC Coordination report for bus 3 R-3 18
  19. 19. 6.5 Site visit in the first week On the first Saturday of the first week, we were taken for a site visit. This site was the W-10 sector located in the Khalidiya area of Abu Dhabi. Engineer Naseer an employee at Sawa Lake who works as a general electrical engineer was the supervisor on-site. The scope of work at W-10 was the changing the streetlights that were already there and installing the new ones. Sawa Lake Electro Mechanical overlooked this operation in its entirety. Since the day’s operation was in its concluding stages by the time we reached the site, we were able to learn about the substation rooms and the feeder pillars In one of the substation rooms located in the W-10 Khalidiyah area, like any other substation in an urban locality, there was a compartment visible to the eye and an another compartment which was behind it and it was inaccessible to the naked eye. In the one that is to the front and visible, there are 2 transformers with the normal primary and secondary sides. The low voltage side, which is the secondary side since this is a step-down transformer, has thicker wires because there is normal amount of current coming with the a comparatively lesser force. The high voltage side has thinner wires. (We related this to a water gushing example. If the same amount of water is coming with a greater force, the pipeline is narrow and thin, if the same amount is coming with a lesser force, the pipeline is thick) 19
  20. 20. Figure 12: Site visit: Breakers 20
  21. 21. Figure 13: Site visit 21
  22. 22. Figure 14: site visit: Transformer in the W-10 Substation 22
  23. 23. Figure 15: site visit: Transformer data 23
  24. 24. 6.6 Second site visit in the second week In the second week of our internship, we were taken to the site of Yas Retail mall. We went with Mr. Kalam and other two workers. That day, they were to do the testing of the 22kV/0.4kV transformer located at the site. This was a long and hard task as many parameters had to be properly and accurately tested. Apart from that, the issue here was that an authorized person had the key and access to open the transformer room and this took time as the person had not reached the place by the time the Sawa Lake workers had reached. Also, a complete summary of the ”Nameplate details” is acquired by simply looking at the nameplate on the transformer and then recording it on the sheet of the Sawa Lake transformer test report. 24
  25. 25. Figure 16: site visit: Name-plate details 25
  26. 26. The parameters involved in the calculation while the testing of the transformer is being performed were: – Nameplate details – Insulation resistance test This test is carried out to ensure that the windings inside the transformer is properly insulated without fail. Also, thermal deterioration is also checked for here. This test is very important as it is key for commissioning and other stuff. For this test, in the winding category we have 3 divisions, which are the HV to earth, HV to LV and LV to earth. For the forst one the standared voltage is 5kV, for HV to LV, the standard voltage is 2.5kV and for the last one the voltage is 1kV. For each of these standard voltage divisions, the resistance is checked first at 15 seconds and then at 60 seconds. The resistance values are recorded in the report. Figure 17: site visit: The Insulation resistance test table 26
  27. 27. – Winding Resistance This is the test where the resistance of the winding is tested. The taps are the ratios of the windings internally set inside a transformer. These taps are set to certain combinations with which the transformers are made to operate. These combinations could be as follows: ∗ 5-6 ∗ 4-6 ∗ 4-7 ∗ 3-7 ∗ 3-8 In the windings resistance test, for the High voltage side, for each of the tap combination, there are 3 phases which are: ∗ 1U-1V ∗ 1V-1W ∗ 1W-1U Therefore, the resistance for every phase in a single tap combination is checked using the multi- meter OR the megger testing instrument. Once the values are acquired, these values are recorded in the test report that was with Mr. Kalam doing all these tests. On the LV side however, the tap is just one which is 03 and the different phases are namely: ∗ 2u-2v ∗ 2v-2w ∗ 2w-2u ∗ 2u-n ∗ 2v-n ∗ 2w-n 27
  28. 28. for each of these phases the resistance is checked for and is put in the report. Figure 18: site visit: The winding resistance test table 28
  29. 29. – Turns Ratio Test This test was done using a sophisticated hand-held megger device where a cable that is divided in 2 is first connected to the device and one end of it is connected to the LV side while the other end is connected to the HV side. On either of these sides the connections of this cable is done based on the phases that are color coded. The cables are connected to these color coded phases with certain combinations. These combinations for the HV phase connection are: ∗ Red-Yellow ∗ Yellow-Blue ∗ Blue-Red These combinations for the LV phase connections are: ∗ Red-neutral ∗ Yellow-neutral ∗ Blue-neutral The taps combinations of the transformer for the turns ratio test is the same as the previous one. For every tap, there exist these 3 phase connection configurations for both, LV and HV. And thus, for each of these phase combinations (in LV and HV), for each of the tap combinations, the turns ratio is acquired through the sophisticated hand-held Megger device. The ratios are recorded in the report. 29
  30. 30. Figure 19: site visit: The turns ratio test table 30
  31. 31. – Vector Group Test The vector group configuration and the such miscellaneous details are given in a way that can be interpreted on the name plate: ∗ First letter in upper-case, in our case: D which implies Delta ∗ small letter denoting low voltage, in our case ”y” ∗ The angle of phase denoted by the hours in a clock It is vital for the transformers to be connected in parallel in order for them to have the same phase shift because if this is not the case, the transformer will inevitably act as a supplier of current to the next one almost all the time. A typical transformer consists of primary and secondary windings on the same core made of iron. 6.7 Pictorial representations of the second site visit 31
  32. 32. Figure 20: The nameplate of the transformer at Yas 32
  33. 33. Figure 21: The connection configuration of the transformer at Yas Mall site 33
  34. 34. Figure 22: The device for vector group value computation 34
  35. 35. Figure 23: The thick HV side cable 35
  36. 36. Figure 24: The 3 phases denoted as RYB lodged in the HV side of the transformer 36
  37. 37. Figure 25: The Megger device that is used to carry out the insulation resistance test 37
  38. 38. 6.8 Cable testing machinery On the Wednesday of the third week, the huge device that is used for cable testing purposes was brought to the office as it was not being used and was not kept in the store. We were told by Engineer Hassan, the General Manager, about the mechanism of the device and how it us used also as a fault detector and how that detection is used to verify that the cable is doing fine and if its is not, then the requirement for a better and more usable cable is given. 38
  39. 39. Figure 26: The Cable testing device used by Sawa Lake for cable testing purposes 39
  40. 40. 6.9 Streaming of security camera over the internet A new set of security Closed-circuit TV Cameras had been installed and a task was given to us which was to stream the view over the internet. Within the network it was used only as local access but for it to be able to be viewed from outside as much as being in a different company, it had to be globally streamed. The initial thing to be done was to acquire the Network system information from the digital video recorder installed in the office of the general manager. The Local Area Network option is available in many DVRs. This meant that we can access the stream from the local computers in the company using the local IP address which goes like 192.168 so and so. The issue arrived when the talk of accessing it from outside the network came as it wasn’t easy. We did intense research on the subject and found that one way to access the security camera stream from outside was to employ the method of port forwarding Port forwarding is a method that permits pockets belonging to any protocol to be forwarded. The local network had a global access from anywhere but the camera did not have it. Therefore port forwarding was used to forward all the local ports of the local network to a pre-assigned global IP address (that will represent the local address accessed from outside) such that when this global IP address is entered in the browser with the specific port of the camera, the camera port will be forwarded and the IP address of the local network will be accessed. 6.9.1 Things involved in port forwarding ∗ Port Map ∗ DMZ enabling/disabling ∗ rules to be made and applied ∗ starting port and ending port to be specified ∗ Protocol: either TCP or UDP or both at the same time It was important to make the setting changes from the default settings so that the router could be perfectly configured. There were many problems in this as sometimes a particular port was not open. A few times even after all the port forwarding parameters were met, the camera IP could not be accessed and some error was shown. Also, there were other issues faced like when the streaming software app was downloaded on the iPad of the general manager, no stream was showing up. After much trial and error methodology, the DMZ was finally enabled and port forwarding was done and the camera could be accessed globally over the internet with the catch that it could be done on Internet Explorer. 6.10 Third site visit In the sixth week of the internship there was a site visit. This time the work was of maintenance in the transformer. The site was near the roundabout of ADNEC. Since it was just maintenance, not much was done as everything seemed proper and the transformer was not yet energized. It was tested by one of the Sawa Lake employees back in August 2013. 40
  41. 41. Figure 27: Instructions on the cabinet door (3).jpg 41
  42. 42. Figure 28: Panel set up on the TRM transformer The maintenance of this TRM transformer didn’t take a very long time as it was already tested before 42
  43. 43. Figure 29: Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) panel 43
  44. 44. Figure 30: the details of the equipment on the nameplate 44
  45. 45. Figure 31: the earth fault indicator panel. This doesn’t have a response to the fault, it only indicates if there is on 45
  46. 46. Figure 32: some more breaker wirings 46
  47. 47. 7 Assessment of the internship 7.1 skills gained from the internship The skills gained from the internship were positive to a substantial extent. From this internship, we got to have valuable experience and this experience is the kind we will cherish for he rest of our lives. Working on field, observing the engineers gave us a hands-on training as to how we are supposed to conduct ourselves while on duty. It also taught us punctuality on site. Another thing this internship taught us was the on-site rules and regulation that one has to follow as an engineer. These rules are strict as they pertain to safety and security of life and property. We were taught the importance of this as we were told to wear proper gears to work on-site like the proper shoes and florescent jacket. Applying these gave us a real feel of what it is like to be an engineer and to work on field. We also gained quite some technical knowledge in the office and as well as on site. We observed the engineers who tested the transformers and had our queries and questions answered on-site. We closely saw how all the tests were being done and what all equipment was used in these tests. The special equipment used was vastly different than what was used while in academics and theory. This difference made us believe that other things will also be quite different on field than what we learn in theory. This difference helped us to gain knowledge of how different equipment works, for instance, the megger make for testing, and how these equipment help us in getting the required result. The knowledge of technical details of different kind of equipment was acquired, also we got the know how of the test document that the testing engineer has to fill while testing. We saw the different fields in tables that were empty and had to be filled every time a test was done. Another thing we learned was the way things are managed and handles in the company. Every employee knows his and her proper job role and does all that he or she can to make sure that the job is done in the right way. Coordination techniques and how we will have to work in sync in the future was one thing of which the knowledge we acquired. We also gained immense knowledge of the softwares that are used to generate, simulate and test power systems and the most important of them was Easy Power. Knowledge of how to work with easy power gave us command over it and we were able to design single line diagrams as per the provided case files with significant ease over time. Knowledge of Easy Power made us generate reports with ease too. We were also able to carry out different kind of tests and analyses including short circuit, power stability and flow, relay coordination. We could also interpret the different analyses result data and make conclusions based on it. 47
  48. 48. 7.2 How will this internship effect future career plans This internship was really helpful in determining the road map for my future career plans. We got to learn things that will pave way for advancing our career in the set field. The site visits were also very beneficial for us as they taught us of the equipment that were used in the field. We had witnessed what it is to be working with competent people on field and we also witnessed the use of different equipment and how they are stored in different places. We also learned about the coordination between different people to carry out the task. All this will prove to be helpful in our career and we already would have been exposed to different things put to use on field. 7.3 How were internship activities different from classroom knowledge During our internship, we realized that what we saw in our internship time was quite different from what we have learned in the classroom. On our very first day when we were given the task to engage in general research about the Ring Main Units and then to further it to Tri-Ring Main and Quad-Ring Main, we realized that these were somethings we had not yet taken or even heard of while gaining theoretical knowledge in the University. While the engagement in general research was going on, this realization was even more as we found out that there were more vocabularies and abbreviations that we were not aware of. These included the details of devices and systems like DMS and Remote Terminal Unit (RTU), the details and information about which are mentioned in the Internship Activities part of the report. There was also the aspect of usage of entirely different verbs and vocabulary when describing what competent people did while testing, maintaining and commissioning equipment at different sites. Vocabularies and usage of words in sentences like ”shutdown”, ”earthing” were a few of the new usage learned. Apart from that, the whole business element og such electrical operations was a somewhat new concept and how different inquiries were received by the company and how the company responded to those inquiries with a quotation based on a pre-decided price arrangement was something we as students had seldom thought of The vital relation between the skill of an engineer and the whole business element to it makes a complete package and both go hand in hand. As students, we are taught of the theory in entirety but when it comes to practical, hands-on training the monetary benefits and losses pertaining to an engineer’s skill is also equally important. 48
  49. 49. 8 Conclusion and acknowledgement To conclude, with this internship we take loads of needed experience and have a practical insight into what it is like to be in the shoes of an engineer on field. We would like to extend our heartfelt gratitude for all the extensive help, assistance, knowledge, hands-on learning, experience, verbal and physical training provided to us while our momentary professional stay at this vibrant company. It is pertinent to say that from the very first day, we were treated very well. We are thankful to the General Manager Eng. Hassan, who guided us throughout and provided us with worthy and challenging assignments and introduced us to key software, the Projects Manager Eng. Alaa who was keen to groom us professionally, Mr. Naseer, Mr. Kalam, Eng. Waqas, Mr. Riyas, and Mr. Zahid who have been seeing to it that we get proper hands-on experience on site and Ms. Lynie who helped us gain insight into their company operations. 49
  50. 50. References [1] Company profile of Sawa Lake Electro Mechanical LLC 50
  51. 51. Here-in the document of the internship report for EEN399 (Field) ends. 51

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