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Abstract Book92-9-12

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Abstract Book92-9-12

  1. 1. International Association for Dental Research Iranian Division of IADR IADR www.iadr-iran.com 11-13 Dec 2013 Olympic Hotel -Tehran-Iran WHO Collaborating Center for Training and Research in Dental Public Health, Tehran, I.R. Iran Dorsunteb Pars Abstract Book
  2. 2. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress Abstract Book
  3. 3. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book
  4. 4. 5 Index Organizing Committee Messages .........................................................10 Organizing Committee.................................................................................16 Iranian IADR Officers....................................................................................17 Scientific Committee & Abstract Reviewers....................................17 Sessions Chairs................................................................................................18 Featured Presentations...............................................................................19 Workshops.........................................................................................................27 IADR-WHO Symposium...............................................................................38 Oral & Poster Presentation ......................................................................41 Abstracts in order of ID numbers H. BAGHERI G Biomimetic Synthetic Enamel: A Potential Remineralizing Agent for Enamel Repair............................42 M. BONABI Adherence of Iranian Dentists to Information Technology...........................................................43 A. BAGHALIAN Fracture Resistance of Posts in Full-Coverage Restorations of Primary Incisors..................................44 A. KESHVAD Human and Animal Bone Substitutes for Augmentation before Implant Placement............................45 A. PARHIZ Bone Debris vs. Allografts in Repairing Implant Buccal Bone Dehiscence.........................................46 O. MOGHADDAS Role of Titanium Mesh in Reconstruction of Ridge Deficiencies....................................................47 F. FARSHCHI Reverse Contrast Digital Radiography in Root Fracture Diagnosis..................................................48 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress Abstract Book
  5. 5. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 6 N. NOURBAKHSH The Effect of OTC Bleaching Products on Enamel Microhardness..................................................49 F. FARAJI Effect of GC Tooth Mousse and MI Paste Plus on Dental Plaque Acidity...........................................50 A. DARNAHAL Porcelain Laminate Fracture Resistance on Incisal Reduction less than 2mm....................................51 D. NIKNAM Effect of Fluoride and Chlorhexidine Varnishes on Interproximal Plaque pH.....................................52 A. NAJAFPOUR The Role of HIV Infection on Oral Pigmentation.......................................................................53 H.-. MOOSAVI Clinical Effectiveness of Laser on Postoperative Hypersensitivity...................................................54 T. HOOSHMAND Degree of Conversion of Low-Shrinkage Composites Photo-Activated by LED and Halogen...................55 E. JAFARPOUR Investigation of Implant Width on Distribution of Stress in Adjacent Bone.......................................56 F. NILCHIAN Quality Assessment of the Information Related to Fissure Sealant.................................................57 S. ALIREZAEI Formulation of New Mucoadhesive Containing Phenytoin on Wound Healing..................................58 N. MOHAMMADZADEH AKHLAGHI Residual Root Thickness Evaluation after Pre-Flaring Using Gates Glidden Drills................................59 S. SADEGHI Effects of bonding agent and sealant viscosity  on sealant microleakage.........................................60 A. MESGARANI Accuracy of Two Radiographic Methods in Diagnosis of Root Resorption........................................61 N. RAHSHENAS Relationship between Art (Painting) with Stress, Anxiety, Depression in Dentists...............................62 H. RAHIMI Effect of Stress on Salivary Ion Content in Orthodontic Patients....................................................63 A. PAHLEVAN SEM Evaluation of Intracanal Dentin Changes in Endodontically Treated Teeth: ................................64 S. AZADNIA A Biocompatibility Comparison of Nanosilver Coated Gutta-Percha and Standard Gutta-Percha.............65 L. RANJBAR OMRANI Internal Evaluation of Operative Dentistry Department of Tehran University....................................66 S. KHAZAEI Effects of Different Prosthesis Materials on Stress Distribution of Implant.......................................67 S. ASEFI Introduction of Iranian 3D Dental Cast Simulator.....................................................................68 A. PAKFETRAT Removal of Refractory Erosive Lichen Planus by CO2 Laser .........................................................69 A. SEDIGH NIA Comparison Of Apically Extruded Debris Between Hero And Race Systems......................................70 R. HAMEDI The Effect of Bone Metabolic Alterations on Orthodontic Tooth Movement.....................................71 M. ABBASI Coronal Leackage Of Gutta-percha Or Resilon Using An Intraorifice Barrier......................................72 M. MINA Mathematical Beta Function for Maxillary Arch Form Prediction...................................................73 H. YOUSEFI Interleukin-10 Gene Polymorphisms in Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.........................74
  6. 6. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 7 M. NEJADKARIM Stress Distribution at the Internal Surface of Dental Implants......................................................75 N. MOHEBBIAN Debonding of Ceramic Brackets Using Er-YAG Laser...................................................................76 J. ORANGI Enhance Socket Preservation with Combination of Bio-Oss with Silk .............................................77 L. KHEIRI The Osteoregenerative Effects of PDGF-BB with MSCs Loaded on FDBA..........................................78 S.R. HABIB ABADI Implant Location Influence on Stress Distribution in Implant Assisted RPDs.....................................79 S. SEYEDZADEH SABOUNCHI Search for Evidence Behavior among Dental Faculty Members in Iran............................................80 A. ALBUJEER HIV/AIDS Awareness Among Iraqi Medical and Dental Students...................................................81 A. EBN AHMADY Designing an Oral Health Surveillance System in Iran.................................................................82 S. SHAHRABI FARD Evaluation of Zirconia Post and Zirconia Coated FRC Post............................................................83 S. ARAGHI PH Changes of Intracanal Materials in Simulated Root Surface Defects...........................................84 G. NAHVI Apical Transportation of Waveone File with Full-Rotation versus Reciprocation Movement..................85 M.T. BAGHANI Mesenchymal Stem Cells Delivery in Maxillofacial Bone Regeneration: Systematic Review...................86 M. SHABANI Laser Assisted Monitoring of Dental Caries in Early Childhood Caries Prevention...............................87 S.S. HASHEMI KAMANGAR Effect of Bleaching on the Microhardness and Color of Composites...............................................88 S. ETEHADIEH KOOCHAK The Effect of Firing on Marginal Integrity of Zirconia Core...........................................................89 N.S. MATINI Invisible Dental Injuries (Cracks) due to General Anesthesia Intubation..........................................90 B. TAHANI Attitude and Practice of Dentists regarding Tobacco Cessation in Iran.............................................91 B. DADRESANFAR Effectiveness of Reciproc and iRace on Canal Wall Cleanliness (SEM).............................................92 A. AHADI Histocompatibility and Setting Time of Endodontic Cement........................................................93 A. ZIADLOU Endodontic Cements Influence on Odontogenic Differentiation of Pulp Stem Cells.............................94 M. MOJAHEDI Laser Assisted Pain Reduction after Vital Pulp Therapy...............................................................95 M. GHASEMI Association of Periodontal Condition with Serum PSA Level........................................................96 H. BAHRAMIAN Is Anxiety Affecting Iranians’ Oral Health Behavior?..................................................................97 P. MEHRIAR Effect of Magnesium on Bonding Strength of MTA Based Cement.................................................98 G. AZARBAKHSH Evaluation of Oral Medicine New Lesson Plan, Requirement and Questionnaire................................99 A. FARZAN A New Grading System for Orthodontic Treatment Quality Assessment.........................................100
  7. 7. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 8 S. TOOPCHI Effect of Enoxolone on Dental Plaque, Gingival Inflammation, and Bleeding....................................101 P. MEHRVARZFAR Antimicrobial Comparison of Green Tea Extract and Calcium Hydroxide.........................................102 H. BAKHTIAR Regenerative Endodontic Treatment of Immature Permanent Teeth by Using PRP............................103 M. KARCHED Real-Time PCR Quantification of Periodontal Pathogens in Diabetic Kuwaiti Children.........................104 L. ATASH BIZ YEGANEH CBCT and Periapical Radiography in Diagnosis of Strip Root Perforations........................................105 D.S. MAHOUTCHI Diagnosis of Gingival Biotype by Probing Technique vs. Visual Method..........................................106 M. BOSKABADY Fissure-Sealants Microleakage Based on the Type of Solvent in Bonding-Agents...............................107 M. AZARIAN The Influence of Implant Dimension on Stress Frequency Responses............................................108 R. BARDAL Accuracy of Different Image Modalities in Detection of Bone Lesions............................................109 N. JAMEI Evaluation of One Iranian Probiotic Yogurt’s Effect on Salivary S. Mutans Count...............................110 M.T. BAGHANI Evaluation of Silicone Effect on Implant Abutment Interface Microbial Leakage...............................111 Y. REZVANI The Effect of Intranasal Midazolam with/without  N2O/O2 on Children’s Behavior............................112 M. KARIMI Knowledge of Dentists About Stepwise Excavation and Pulp Capping............................................113 J. MEHRANI SABET Selective Alveolar Decortication Technique for Facilitating Orthodontic Tooth Movement...................114 Z. SHAKIBAEI Accuracy of Two Radiographic Techniques in Diagnosis of Root Fractures.......................................115 M. MALEKI GORJI SEM Evaluation of Etching Pattern of 18%HCL: A Pilot Study.......................................................116 G. RADAFSHAR Placebo Medication for Pain Relief During Scaling and Root Planning............................................117 A. FAYAZ Determining Depth and Radius of Curve of Spee: A Pilot Study...................................................118 N. NAGHAVI Evaluation of Genotoxic Effects of Two Endodontic Cements......................................................119 G. RADAFSHAR Long Term Survival Rate of teeth Requiring Multiple Treatment Procedure.....................................120 N. SOLTANIAN Osteoblast Survival during Different Bone Harvesting Techniques: An Animal Study..........................121 F. SARLATI Periodontal Flap and Osseous Resective Surgery Techniques: Computer Assisted Learning..................122 S. ALIJANI Comparison of Single and Double Jaw Surgery in ClII Patients.....................................................123 H. SHEKARCHIZADEH Self-perceived Oral Health of Addicts in Rehabilitation in Tehran, Iran...........................................124 M. KASHKULI Home Bleaching Relapse in Patients with and without Recall Treatment........................................125 N. DABIRI Frequency of Oral Connective Tissue Lesions in Children...........................................................126
  8. 8. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 9 S. ZOKANI Effect of Coffee on Discoloration of Three Nano Composites......................................................127 F. SHIRBAN En-Mass Distalization of Maxillary Posterior Teeth with Mini-Screw Supported Hyrax........................128 N. MAHINFAR The Effect of Bleaching on the Microleakage of Silorane-Based Composite.....................................129 S. RAZEGHI Medical Emergency Management Among Iranian Dentists.........................................................130 F. BASTAMI Demographic Factors Affecting the Survival Rate of Dental Implants.............................................131 P. MOHEBBI Mineral Trioxide Aggregate X-Ray Diffraction Analysis at Different pH Values...................................132 N. BAYATI Effect of Zeolite on Sealing Ability of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate .................................................133 P. OMIDSALAR Anticariogenic Effect of Some Herbs....................................................................................134 S. RABIEI Primary Care Nurses’ Perspective on Children’s Oral Health.......................................................135 P. VARES Correlation between the Gingival Embrasure Space and Interdental Papilla....................................136 N. YOUSSEFI Influence of Cavity Size Modification on Microleakage of Bulk-Cured Composites.............................137 R. POURABBAS Effects of Plasma Rich in Growth Factors in Extraction Sockets....................................................138 M. NOURBAKHSH Effect of Polishing and Glazing on Color Stability of Porcelain......................................................139 S. ASHNAGAR Prevalence of Oral Lesions in AIDS and HIV Positive Patients.......................................................140 N. MOHAMMADZADEH REZAEI Green Tea Mouthwash in Postoperative Pain Following Third-Molar Extraction................................141 S. JAFARNIA Effect of Lip Line on Anterior Teeth Proportion Preference.........................................................142 M. BROOKHIM Evaluation of Ki-67 and PCNA in Subtypes of Amelonlastoma.....................................................143 Z. TEHRANI Low-Level Laser Effect on Pain after BSSO Surgery...................................................................144 A. HASSANI Implant Placement Simultaneous Alveolar Ridge Augmentation with Block Bone Graft......................145 S. BABAZADEH Social Capital and Self-Perceived Oral Health, Urban HEART Study...............................................146 T. SAFAIE Effect of CPP-ACPF on Oral Symptoms of Patients under Chemotherapy........................................147 A. ORUMCHI Double Taper and Simple Taper Fiber Posts...........................................................................148 M. SHIRYAN Comparison of Two Adhesive Systems on FRC Post Bond Strength...............................................149 Z. MOMENI Dental Pain and Self Perceived Oral Health, Urban HEART..........................................................150 N. BAHROLOLUMI Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Four Intracanal Medicaments on L929 Fibroblasts...................................151 M. SAFAIE YAZDI Stepwise Excavation Using MTA: A Randomized Clinical Trial......................................................152
  9. 9. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 10 S. SABBAGH Influence of Spatial Resolution on Detection of Non-Cavitated Proximal Lesions..............................153 S.S. FAKHR TABATABAIE Assessment of the Electromyographic Activity and Vertical Dimension (VDR)..................................154 A.H. NEJAT Dental Bleaching Induced Redox Perturbation........................................................................155 N. PAHLAVAN Five Years Epidemiology Study on Oral Cancers in Tehran (2001-2006)..........................................156 M. GHOLAMI Assessment of Adults’ Periodontal Knowledge Following a Mass Media Campaign...........................157 S. NEMATI ANARAKI Effect of Fluoride on Enamel Roughness after Home Bleaching...................................................158 M. DEHGHANI Effect of Combined Fluoride-Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse on Orthodontic Patients’ Oral Health..............159 M. HAJIHASANI Effect of Irradiation Time and Distance on Nano-Hybrid Composites Microhardness..........................160 S. MARANDI Assessing the Knowledge of Senior Dental Students towards Antibiotic Prescription.........................161 F. AFKHAMI Radiographic Localization of Mandibular Foramen in an Iranian Population....................................162 S. BANAVA Comparison of CalciumHydroxide, MTA, and CEM Cement in Stepwise Excavation: Final Results...........163 E. KOSARIEH Comparison of Penetration Depth of Two Different  Photosensitizers in Root Canal Wall....................164 N. KOOHESTANIAN Assessment of Retentive Strength Orthodontic Bands Cemented with ACP-Modified GI.....................165 A.S. MOSTAFAVI Internal Connection Reverse Torque Values in 3 Types of Abutments............................................166 M. HASSANPOUR SHATER Prevalence of Different Techniques used in Implant Supported Fixed Prosthesis...............................167 Z. RAHMANI Geometric Parameters of Implants and stress distribution in Partial Overdenture.............................168 A. ANSARI Potential Psychological Effect of GA on Pediatric Dental Patients.................................................169 N. PASDAR Oral/Intramuscular Ketamine, Midazolam, Atropine for Dental Sedation........................................170 G. ANSARI Primary Teeth Pulpotomy with C.E.M/LLLT, Two Years Result......................................................171 M. MIR Microleakage Analysis of Resilon Obturation Material in Laser Assisted RCT....................................172 M. ZARE JAHROMI Effect of  Triple Antibiotic and Chlorhexidine on Shear Bond of Composite.....................................173 H. NOJEHDEHYAN PLGA Microspheres Containing Minocycline as Drug Delivery System............................................174 N. ALASVAND Preparation of Gelatin-Hydroxyapatite Microspheres as Cell Carrier.............................................175 K. SARGERAN Dental Visit and Number of Missing Teeth among Tehrani Elderly................................................176 S. HAMIDIAVAL Cephalometric Assessment of Jaws Growth in 9-11yrs Normal Subject..........................................177 A. JAFARI NAEIMI Force Relaxation of Three Different Orthodontic Latex Elastic Products..........................................178
  10. 10. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 11 S.M. MOAZZAMI Self-Sealing Ability of High Copper Amalgams with Self-Etch Adhesives.........................................179 A. AZIZI Preventive Effect of Zinc Sulfate on Oral Mucositis...................................................................180 M.H. KHOSHNEVISAN Oral Hygiene Behavior in Iran: National NCD Risk Factor Surveillance............................................181 J. SARABADANI Study Experiences of Staff and Faculty Members of Oral Medicine...............................................182 B. HOJJATIE Computational Models for Temperature/Stress Prediction in Layered Dental Porcelains.....................183 S. HONKALA Is Toothbrushing Associated with Other Oral Health-Related Habits in Kuwait?................................184 P. LUCAS Tooth Wear Studied via Single-Particle Interaction with an Enamel Surface.....................................185 E. HONKALA The Effect of 5Weeks Xylitol Consumption on Oral Microflora.....................................................186 A. VAN CASTEREN The Role of Dust, Grit and Phytoliths in Tooth Wear.................................................................187 A.J. MOULE Residual Active Chlorine in Sodium Hypochlorite Solutions after Tissue Dissolution..........................188 Congress Contributors................................................................................189 Congress Sponsors........................................................................................191 Diamond Sponsor ..........................................................................................................192 Platinum Sponsor..........................................................................................................193 Gold Sponsor................................................................................................................194 Silver Sponsor ..............................................................................................................195
  11. 11. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 12 Iranian Division of IADR President Professor Ghassem Ansari Dear Valued Delegates, Presenters, Colleagues It is a great pleasure for me as the President of IADR-Iranian Division to welcome you to the uniquely organized first joint congress of Iranian and Kuwaiti Divisions. This congress has shaped in such a wonderful scale under the leadership of Dr. Sepideh Banava (Congress Chair and one of the leading national researchers) and enthusiasm of her team in association to all of you who made this to happen by your contribution. I like to high light that as most of the other international events, this congress has also taken such an enormous amount of work and communications in order to allow this to happen. All preparation and arrangement steps of this congress were made possible by individual courage and enthusiasm of each and every member of the organizing team which deserves my personal appreciation. As the nature of the IADR congresses provides unique opportunities for researchers in various fields, this one is no exception. Being engaged and responsible in almost all of the Iran’s IADR history, I am confident to say that this year’s event is planned as one of the most active and well covered research products of the two divisions. This is clearly highlights the position of the research status in this region and the potential role could be played by the two divisional members within the IADR network. I also like to emphasis that this year’s event illustrates the research capacity of our nationwide dental scientists. As the main policy of the IADR Iranian Division is to use all of its potential research opportunities it is hoped that within the next couple of years this country can find its deserved international position. A nationwide plan is on to engage all of the national dental research active members. Herewith I urge everyone to register with us and let us keep our files updated with all research activities going on in every corner of our great country. Being the largest in dental population size, academic facilities and research institution numbers which inevitably provide massive potentials for research production compare to other nations of the region in EMRO and most probably AMER groups, I am confident that we are impatiently moving towards our goals. This will eventually reveal the actual role of Iran in the world of Dental Research. Another unique aspect of this congress is collaboration of the WHO and their offices Organizing Committee Messages
  12. 12. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 13 in the region. With the leadership of Prof Khoshnevisan who has headed his Iranian counterparts, we will have several symposiums and group discussions in the field of Community Oral Health and their hot topics. With the presence of WHO active representatives in the region in these discussions I am sure these meetings will provide valuable outcomes for their group and their communities. I am fully aware as there have been massive efforts and courageous in our dental fair team which resulted in their collaboration with several supporting companies and dental agents who offered their full support to make this year’s dental exhibition different. This is why I like to express my personal appreciation to their directors and engaged team in the congress in advance. The IADR Headquarter team is thanked for their support and help throughout the course of congress preparation and in particular the CONFEX facility providers who made the online submission, review and registration of the congress possible, Special thanks to Dr. Christopher Fox, Ms Marissa Napinsky and Ms Denise Steszoff for their valued helps. Last but not least, I like to say that it is of great value to me and my colleagues to share this year’s congress with the Kuwaiti colleagues. The Iranian team’s highest appreciation is expressed to Prof Jawad Behbehani president of AMER and Prof Eino Honkala who were fully supportive of this event from start. Without their generous help and support such collaboration would not form to this level. I also like to express my appreciation to all other international colleagues who have contributed to this congress. I can reassure everyone that this rather small but unique community, when compared to other Dental Associations, has a lot to say and will bring valued ideas, research results and courage to those involved in the field of Dental and Medical research. I hope that you enjoy your time here in Tehran and have a wonderful scientific occasion to remember for years to come. With Best regards Professor Ghassem Ansari President of the IADR Iranian Division
  13. 13. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 14 Congress President Dear Distinguished Colleagues, Researchers, Dentists, and Students, This is a great opportunity for me to express my deep gratitude to you and welcome you to the 9th Iranian and 13th Kuwaiti divisions of IADR Joint Congress. In every IADR congress around the world, the latest research results are presented. For those students, dentists, and researchers who put a lot of effort into moving along with developments in the realm of knowledge, technology and research, IADR is the best way to keep themselves up-to-date. In the field of science and research, every single question matters and can inspire new studies. A researcher becomes GLOBAL instantly by presenting his/her research in any of the IADR congresses. In my opinion, IADR congress builds a strong bridge between science, knowledge, research, technology and dental clinics. Therefore this scientific and prestigious congress connects all the people in these areas. The 9th Iranian division of IADR congress is so special this year due to several reasons; the Kuwaiti division has joined and a close collaboration has happened between the two divisions; WHO Collaborative center in Iran has organized a symposium to connect the oral hygiene leaders in the region. A hard effort was made by the organizing committee since almost a year ago to acquaint dental students, general dentists, and specialist with the scientific and research basis of the IADR Another positive point of this congress is having a close and scientific collaboration of dental companies with IADR. This great event was not possible without tremendous efforts of my valued team and their supports. I’m really grateful of Dr. Omid Moghaddas, Dr. Arash Rahimi, Dr. Mohammad Safaie Yazdi and Ms. Azin Kazemi who stood by me during the organization of the congress. Last but not the least I want to express my special thanks to Dr. Ghassem Ansari who trusted me for holding this congress. I wish you all great days in this international congress. Dr. Sepideh Banava 9th Iranian IADR Congress President
  14. 14. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 15 Head of Scientific Committee Dear Colleagues, It is an honour and a great pleasure to welcome you all to the 9th Annual Meeting and Scientific Congress of IADR Iranian Division in Tehran, Iran from December 11-13, 2013. This is a joint program with 13th Kuwaiti Division and WHO collaborating Center for Training and Research in Dental Public Health in Iran. I am proud and thankful for the considerable extent of scientific contribution this year. This meeting consists of 11 scientific workshops, 68 oral and 78 poster presentations on current dental and collateral research findings selected from 250 submitted articles. Furthermore, a 3-day WHO symposium will run concurrently with scientific sessions. This would be a unique opportunity to exchange valuable knowledge and recent advances in the field of dental research among scientists in this region and we hope this event will facilitate more communication and application of the research findings. The scientific presentations will be scheduled according to the IADR scientific groups and the final outline will be presented in the congress program. On behalf of the scientific committee, I would like to express my sincere gratitude toward those who collaborate with us in different committees and concerned authorities, in addition to our 30 valuable referees and other dental research centers for their dedication and support. I would like to welcome you all to this event with the hope for contribution towards improvement of Oral Health Researches. Sincerely, Dr. Azita Tehranchi Head of Scientific Committee
  15. 15. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 16 Head of Executive Committee Dear colleagues and friends It is my great pleasure to welcome you to the 9th annual congress of Iranian division of IADR in Tehran. The members of Executive, Organizing and Scientific committees of Iranian Division of IADR worked so hard to prepare an outstanding program, and we are all grateful to them for their efforts. The scientific program of IADR will cover all the major aspects of dentistry, presented by prominent scientists and clinicians and researchers. The conference is also a unique social opportunity to make new acquaintances, meet colleagues from other countries and better know the different National Dental Societies of Iran. This year the congress is joint with 13th annual congress of IADR Kuwaiti division and we are honored to have special guests from Kuwait. I am honored and privileged to be the Head of the Executive committee in this congress and I would like on this occasion to express my gratitude to all people that have contributed to the success of the Iranian division of IADR : Past and present Presidents, General Secretaries,Treasurers and National Delegates. Special thanks to our friends from the Industry, true partners and supporters of the IADR goals. I wish you all a wonderful and memorable experience. Dr. Omid Moghaddas Head of the Executive Committee
  16. 16. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 17 Head of Exhibition Committee Dear Colleagues, It is a great pleasure to welcome you to this international congress with a different exhibition. In this congress, different companies participated to express themselves with their R&D sections to scientifically communicate with the participants. We are thankful to all companies who play an important role in making congresses glorious. In this congress, unlike the past Iranian IADR congresses, some dominant companies have participated as financial sponsors of diamond, platinum, gold, and silver. I am deeply grateful because of their companionship and hopeful to have their support in the future. Sincerely yours Dr. Arash Rahimi Head of Exhibition Committee
  17. 17. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 18 Organizing Committee Congress President: Dr. Sepideh Banava Head of Scientific Committee: Dr. Azita Tehranchi Head of Executive Committee: Dr. Omid Moghaddas Vice Executive Director: Dr. Mohammad Safaie Yazdi Head of Exhibition Committee: Dr. Arash Rahimi Vice Exhibition Director: Babak Mamizad Congress Advisors: Dr. Ghassem Ansari, Dr.Mahtab Nouri, Dr. Haleh Heshmat, Dr. Ebrahim Aminsalehi, Dr.Ali Saghiri, Dr.Keivan Saati Poster Committee: Dr. Haleh Heshmat (Director), Dr. Pooneh Mohebbi, Dr. Raha Tafaroji Workshop Committee: Dr. Ehsan Esnaashari (Director), Dr. Arezou Pezeshkfar, Dr. Mansoureh Emami Arjmand, Dr.Ali Mansouri Public Relations & International Affairs Secretory: Azin Kazemi IADR-WHO Symposium Committee: Dr. Mohammad Hossein Khoshnevisan, Dr. Arezoo Ebn Ahmady, Dr. Sepideh Rabiei Registration Committee: Dr. Sima Alizadeh, Dr. Mona Kashkuli, Shahla Hamidi, Mahsa Hamidi, Jamileh Toghi, Termeh Shemirani, Haniye Tehrani, Janet Shahverdi Website Designing & Support: Flying Feathery Group Publication Committee: Azin Kazemi, Ehsan Shams Graphic & Design: AfraviGroup (Foroozan Kheiri, Bahram Afravi) VIP & Ceremonial Committee: Dr.Vida Dolati, Dr. Mehrnoush Ghobadi, Dr. Linda Nematollahian, Leila Pourjafar Audio-Visual & Media Committee: Zhoubin Ghaziani CE Credit Committee: Zeinab Mozafartash Student Executive Members (in alphabetic order): Haniyeh Haeri Araghi (Head), Sahar Abdollahzadeh, Mina Aghabeygi, Elnaz Alavi, Nazanin Allahyari, Mahsa Amjad, Hamidreza Alimoradi, Parmida Ariaei, Saghar Bahmani, Alireza Darnahal, Nafiseh Farajian Zadeh, Ehsan Farjad, Seyed Hesamodin Haeri Araghi, Zohreh Heydari, Zahra Jabari, Marjan Javadzadeh, Omid Javadzade, Zohreh Kazemi, Peiman Kermaniha, Keikhosro Khosraviani, Donya Sadat Mahoutchi, Negar Manouchehri, Pegah Mirmalek, Nima Mohahegh Dolatabadi, Mehrdad Moradi, Azin Orumchi, Shabnam Pourhaghani, Shadi Poursoltani, Shima Rashidi, Mahdieh Sahrakari, Niloufar Saleh, Mahsa Shadi, Targol Shafizade, Masoud Shahhoseini, Zahra Shakeri, Hamed Shojaei, Negar Soltanian, Sedigheh Toraji, Peyman Vares, Bahareh Yousefian, Mahsa Zeinali, Negin Zokaie, Kaveh Zolfaghar Nasab
  18. 18. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 19 Iranian IADR Officers Ghassem Ansari: President Sepideh Banava: President-Elect Raheleh Hassanizadeh: Secretary Mohammad Jafar Eghbal: Treasurer Ghassem Ansari: Councilor Mahtab Nouri: Immediate Past President Scientific Committee & Abstract Reviewers Ghassem Ansari Arash Azizi Sepideh Banava Katayoun Esfahanizadeh Ali Hassani Raheleh Hassanizadeh Haleh Heshmat Eino Honkala (Kuwait) Sisko Honkala (Kuwait) Tabassom Hooshmand Mohammad Reza Khami Mandana Khatibi Arash Khojasteh Mohammad Hossein Khoshnevisan Sandra Mehralizadeh Hesam Mirmohammadi(Netherlands) Omid Moghaddas Nahid Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi Faramarz Mojtahedzadeh Mahtab Nouri Reza Pourabbas Arash Rahimi Alireza Sadr (USA) Mohammad Ali Saghiri Javad Sarabadani Farhad Shafiei Azita Tehranchi
  19. 19. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 20 Sessions Chairs Dr. Ali Kangarloo Dr. Mohammad Hossein Nekoofar Dr. Mohsen Amin Sobhani Dr. Ezzatollah Khamesi Dr. Ebrahim Majidi Dr. Ali Khader Dr. Mohammad Reza Khami Dr. Haleh Heshmat Dr. Tabassom Hooshmand Dr. Amir Nazari Dr. Seyed Mohammad Reza Safavi Dr. Majid Ghasemianpour Dr. Fariborz Amini Dr. Mahtab Nouri Dr. Mohammad Hossein Khoshnevisan Dr. Amjad Matouq Dr. Arezoo Ebn Ahmady Dr. Sisko Honkala Dr. Soodabeh Sargolzaie Dr. Kaveh Oloomi Dr. Hossein Bagheri Dr. Arash Rahimi Dr. Emad Kosarieh Dr. Mahkameh Moshfeghi Dr. Ahamad RezaTalaeepour Dr. Sandra Mehralizadeh Dr. Saeid Mostafa Moazzami Dr. Tahereh Sadat Jafarzadeh Kashi Dr. Fatemeh Sadat Tabatabaie Dr. Salahudeen AlBulushi Dr. Fatemeh Mashhadiabbas Dr. Farnaz Mahdisear Dr. Mehdi Valizadeh Dr. Kiumars Nazari Moghaddam Dr. Saied Nemati Dr. Arash Khojasteh Dr. Alireza Jafari Naeimi Dr. Hamid Moghaddas Dr. Mohammad Jafarian Dr. Kaveh Seyyedan Dr. Hossein Behnia Dr. Katayoun Esfahanizadeh Dr. Payman Mehrvarzfar Dr. Haleh Kazemi Yazdi Dr. Eino Honkala Dr. Ghassem Ansari Dr. Mojtaba Vahid Golpayegani Dr. Lida Toumarian Dr. Javad Sarabadani Dr. Masoud Ejlali Dr. Faramarz Mojtahedzadeh Dr. Alireza keshvad Dr. Nasrin Esfahanizadeh Dr. Afsaneh Pakdaman Dr. Nahid Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi Dr. Shahram Azimi Dr. Alexander John Moule Dr. Peter Lucas Dr. Khosrow Golshan Dr. Ahmad Najafi Dr. Hassan Torabzadeh Dr. Mahdi Nasibi Dr. Hossein Hesari Dr. Suleiman Mohammad Dr. Abdolhamid Zafarmand 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress - Abstract Book
  20. 20. Featured Presentations
  21. 21. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 22 Dr. Ayoub Pahlevan, DDS, MS Associate Professor Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Dental Faculty Restorative Department, Iran A General Look to Dentin Bonding Systems Nowadays dentists are really confused about the type of the Dentin Bonding Agents (DBA) they are going to select and apply in different clinical cases. Bonding to enamel has been approved for many years and is very reliable but the issue is different with bonding to dentin. There are different factors that make the bonding to dentin more questionable. Nature of the substrate, tag formation, etching pattern and chemical composition are different from enamel and these make the bonding to dentin very technique sensitive. New DBAs are developed to fulfill the whole area but there is need to further research regarding the type of DBA that is suitable and more reliable in different clinical situations. Future needs clinical research and clinical evidence for successful, reliable and non-degradable bond to tooth structure.
  22. 22. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 23 Nelson R. Pinto, MD University of Concepcion, Chile Graduatefrom, Faculty of Dentistry ,University of Concepcion, Chile 1985. Residence in Oral Implantology Ohio State University Faculty of Dentistry, USA, 1990. Residence in Oral Implantology Friburg University Faculty of Dentistry, Germany, 1992. Head of Clinica San AgustinRestorative Implant Department 1993 - 2013 Private Practice exclusive in Oral Implantology. 1989 - 2013 National and International Lecturer in Oral Implantology ( morethan, 200 conferences) National and International Lecturer of Courses in Oral Implantology (more than, 100 courses) Nobel Biocare Key Clinician Consultan 2006 - 2013 Intra-lockInt. Key Clinician Consultant 2005- 2013 Professor, Post GraduateProgram in Oral Impantology and Periodontics, Facultad de Odontología. Universidad de los Andes, Chile 2010 -2013 Visitant Professor: University of Concepcion, Faculty of Dentistry, Implant Program Several Prizes in Clinical Research Presentations Developer of a novel technique for the management of Chronics Wounds with Leucocytes - Platelet Rich Fibrine, Best Oral Research Presentation Prize L-PRF: Technique Overview to Clinical Applications This Symposium will present the background, science, applications and methodologies regarding the use of L-PRFTMmembranes. Clinical cases will be shown to further illustrate the techniques and results that can be derived from its use. The hands-on workshop will enable the participants to become familiar with the membrane-forming apparatus and the various techniques that are utilized when creating and manipulation L-PRFTMmembranes.Upon completion of this hand-on workshop, the participants will have a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms that are pertinent to membrane formation and that take place during augmentation procedures. They will be more familiar with the strategies that enable L-PRFTMto be such a beneficial aid during the healing process. During the hands-on exercises, theparticipantswillhavetheopportunitytoworkwiththemembrane-formingarmamentarium and to employ the techniques necessary for the fabrication of L-PRFTMmembranes and for their correct clinical placement.
  23. 23. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 24 Dr. Mohammad H. Nekoofar  Endodontist, DDs MSc DoIBoE PhD  Vice Dean (Global Strategies & International Affairs) School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Honorary Clinical Lecturer School of Dentistry, Cardiff University, UK Basic Requirements of Dental Biomaterials in Endodontics Thelaunchingofmineraltrioxideaggregatein1995canbeconsideredastheinitiation of the rocketed development of new biomaterials in the field of endodontics. Imperatively, any new biomaterial must not be used for human being until subjected to various defined independent experiments. Obviously manufacturers of new materials cannot postpone marketing of their materials and waiting for the results of the time consuming academic experiments. Therefore they try to bypass some of the basic experiments. It becomes worse when the inventor and the manufacturer of a material are same. In addition, the essential physical and chemical properties of a material may ignore to expedite their marketing. In this presentation, basic and general requirements of dental biomaterials in the field of Endodontics will be discussed and the lack of information about some of the newly introduced biomaterials will be highlighted.
  24. 24. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 25 Dr. Shahram Azimi, DDS, Ms Endodontist, Iran Pain Control Effective pain control during and after endodontic treatment is an essential key for the success of root canal therapy and also professional practice. One of the challenging occasions for a clinician is to control and obtain deep anesthesia when the patient has urgently been referred because of sharp and diffused pulpalgia. Even experienced clinicians might face challenges to achieve deep numbness in case that are so called ‘Hot tooth “. Various theories such as decrease in PH, morphologic changes of neuron, expression of new receptors on axon surface are among those that are currently debated. While reviewing these theories as the probable causes of resistance against achieving anesthesia, clinical solutions to overcome such problem would be discussed.
  25. 25. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 26 Dr. Masoud Mojahedi, DDS, MSc, PhD Associate Professor, Adjunct faculty member of RWTH Aachen University- Germany PhD in Laser in Dentistry Research in LASER Field These days due to increasing the number of LASER users and dentists interests also the lack of new research and evidence bases in this field so It is very important to know how we should plan a research and how we can reach to the scientific target and hope this short course can help to all dentist and students which are interested to have scientific and academic activates.
  26. 26. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 27 Dr. Amir Nazari, DDS, Ph.D Cariology and Operative Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University NICOPE Corporation, JAPAN Toward Perfection in Operative Dentistry: Optical Coherence Tomography Achieving perfection in operative dentistry requires perfection in diagnosis. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a unique diagnostic modality which obtains real- time 2D and 3D high-resolution scans of internal structures using non-ionizing near infra-red spectra. Various applications of OCT have been suggested. OCTmaybeusedduringcariesdiagnosistodetectshallowlesions;duringexamination of a previously restored tooth to evaluate the condition of the restoration; during cavity preparation to check the remaining dentin thickness over the pulp chamber; during placement of resin composite into the cavity to check the proper adaptation of the composite to the cavity surfaces; during post-operative stage to check for any defects at the margins or presence of voids within the restoration. The OCT technology is rapidly developing, and with no doubt, OCT can bring us closer to perfection.
  27. 27. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book Dr. Babak Behboudi Vice President of Middle East and Oceania, International Institute of Marketing Professionals (IIMP®) The Applications of Marketing Research in Dental Research & Clinics Despite of its attributes, marketing researches and studies have vast applications in dental researches. There are a wide range of similarities in both researches and studies that are looking for solving the key problems of patients. Whether we call them clients or patients, the focus point of both marketing researches and dental researches is human being; one is looking for understanding the needs, wants and demands of a patient as a client for receiving better dental care services and cure, and another is looking for exploring new cure for dental damages and ailments. Every clinical research aims to develop a new solution for old or newly found ailments and the successful solutions are those that can be commercialized in a manner that could be applicable cost effectively by dentists. However, there is a gap between the approaches of a solid dental care study and research and those of marketing approaches to the same problem which can be considered as the dark continent of commercialization of dental research and studies. There is no doubt that if a dental care study or research can produce commericializable solution, such a solution can be successfully developed to benefit both dentists and their patience. Every dental care solution should be considered as a product (or customer solution) and, by considering the patient as a customer, needs to be delivered through a precise marketing mix including the critical elements of customer solution, cost to customer, convenience to customer, communication to customer, considering the culture of customer, customer care process and context of the solution for the customer. This article strives to clarify the common context of clinical researches and studies with marketing research and studies in dental care context and the key factors that should be considered in commercializing the dental care solution and products.
  28. 28. Workshops
  29. 29. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 30 Dr. Haleh Heshmat, DDS, MS Specialist in Restorative Dentistry Assistant Professor Azad Dental University, Dental Branch, Iran All About Resin Cements Clinicians might be familiar with the quality and indications of conventional dental cements that historically have been used frequently. But it appears that many yet become confused when it comes to handling self-etch or self-adhesive cements. In this workshop an extensive presentation of resin cements and recent generations of self-adhesive resin cements shall be given. Chemical composition, its effect on the setting reaction and adhesion to various substrates, physical and biological properties and other material aspects along with clinical points and handling guidelines shall be discussed.
  30. 30. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 31 Faramarz Mojtahedzadeh, DMD, MS, MMed Orthodontist, Iran Forced Eruption Forced eruption (FE) is a simple orthodontic movement which basically intends to extrude the tooth structure. FE can be carried out in different occasions and with different intentions, and once a dentist becomes familiar with it, he or she could take advantage of it in many fields as an adjunctive treatment. The method presented in this workshop has the advantage that it requires minimum a recall of orthodontic knowledge. As it does not require conventional fixed orthodontic appliances and designs, the complex biomechanical interactions seen with brackets can be easily bypassed.
  31. 31. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 32 Dr. Sepideh Banava, DDS, MS Specialist in Restorative Dentistry Assistant Professor Head of Dental Materials Department Azad Dental University, Dental Branch, Iran All About Adhesive Systems Different adhesive systems in the market make us so confused. Various classifications, differentapplicationstepsandcompositionsaresocompromising.Selectionbetween total etch and self etch adhesive systems is a question for dentists. Newly introduced adhesive generations are more self-etch with better properties claims. Dentists Need to be aware of adhesive systems, properties, method of application to make a proper decision in their clinical cases. In this workshop all questions about the new generation of adhesives will be covered.
  32. 32. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 33 Dr. Shahram Azimi, DDS, Ms Endodontist, Iran Rotary Instrument in Dentistry In this hands-on workshop the clinical tips on application of rotary instruments in endodontics will be discussed.
  33. 33. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 34 Dr. Arash Rahimi, DDS, MSc Iran Application of Diode Laser in Dentistry Laser technology is quickly evolving with the presence of newer lasers, along with new indications, that are constantly being introduced. The use of lasers has become a major discipline and is currently practiced in dentistry. This workshop offers practical usage of diode laser in dentistry.
  34. 34. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 35 Omid Moghaddas, DDS, MS Periodontist, , DentalXP Expert, Iran Ridge Splitting with Piezosurgery Inserting dental implants in a proper position is one of the most influential factors in achieving success not only from the biomechanical point of view but also from prosthetic and esthetic. In some patients there is not enough available bone so different modalities in ridge augmentation have been proposed for recreating a proper bony bed. Ridge splitting is one of the techniques for increasing the width of the available bone present and has its own criteria. In the workshop the indications, contraindications and probable complications that may happen intra-operatively will be discussed and participants will have a hands on training on animal models.
  35. 35. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 36 Dr.Haleh Kazemi Yazdi, DDS, MS Specialist in Restorative Dentistry Assistant Professor Azad Dental University, Dental Branch, Iran Management of Tooth Wear, Functionally & Aesthetically with Supra-Occlusion Composite Restorations According to the latest epidemiological survey, prevalence of tooth wear is increasing significantly among young and elder patients. Restorative management of worn dentition is a great challenge in general dental practice when tissue loss involves the articulating surface. Short clinical crown height of worn teeth and inadequate space to accommodate a proper restoration can compromise the vitality of worn teeth and resistance of restorations. Using supra-occlusion restorations to restore tooth wear is both reliable and predictable .Reliability and predictability of direct bonding to residual tooth tissue, widened the indication of direct composite restorations from just a single tooth build up to a practical option for full mouth rehabilitation. In spite of a few problems such as discoloration and chipping of restorations; a stable occlusion can be achieved with this treatment. The objective of this brief will be illustrating techniques and considerations of restoring worn teeth utilizing supra- occlusion composite restorations.
  36. 36. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 37 Dr.Fariba Motevasselian, DDS, MS Specialist in Restorative Dentistry, Iran Management of tooth wear The term tooth wear is a general term that can be used to describe the surface loss of dental hard tissues from causes other than dental caries, trauma or as a result of developmental disorders. It is subdividing into those where the severity of tooth wear may be considered to be normal or physiological for that person’s age, or excessive, pathological to the extent that it is associated with functional or aesthetic concerns and is disproportionate for the age of the patient and symptoms of discomfort are present. Treatment plan includes the management of any acute conditions, prevention, stabilization of any underlying dental pathology, placement of definitive dental restorations and final stage involves monitoring and maintenance. It is important to institute review stages in passing from one stage to the next one. While for many cases of pathological tooth wear, a passive management and monitoring may suffice, for a proportion of cases active restorative intervention will become necessary. Active restorative intervention will be subdivided into that for localized wear (Maxillary anterior teeth, Mandibular anterior teeth, localized posterior teeth) and generalized wear. The restorative intervention in three localized tooth and one generalized tooth wear cases are presented.
  37. 37. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 38 Dr.Ebrahim Aminsalehi, DDS, MS Specialist in Restorative Dentistry Assistant Professor Azad Dental University, Dental Branch, Iran The Clinical Tips on Ceramic Restorations Nowadays request for esthetic restorations increase more and more. The main reason is that people knows about our capability to create a beautiful and particularly natural smile. Ceramic laminates and crowns are ideal restorations for anterior and posterior teeth but when they can show their ideal performances that practitioner have enough knowledge about composition, variety, advantages, disadvantages, indications and contraindications of these materials.
  38. 38. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 39 Dr. Brigitte Douaihy, DDS Professional Service Manager GC Middle East Composite Restorations: New Concepts and Applications In modern dentistry, composite restorations occupies a major place in our daily practice. This workshop covers all new concepts and techniques in anterior esthetic restorations and in posterior cases. Minimum Intervention: A way to Go Prevention and conserving tooth structure are of a major importance for both dentists and patients. During this workshop we will propose a new way to take in charge the patient and to assess the risk factors all this in order to put in place the optimal treatment plan.
  39. 39. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 40 This symposium is a cooperation between WHO Collaborative Center, SBMU, Tehran, Iran and Iranian Division of IADR. Dr. Ali Khader: How can we develop comprehensive preventive strategies at the regional level: what should the specific time line priorities be, should these be disease specific? Which social and environmental health determinants should be incorporated and how? Dr. Suleiman Mohammad: How can we measure oral health inequalities and who should undertake this at the regional level? How can we establish a knowledge base that uses a standard set of reporting criteria? Dr. Mohammad H. Khoshnevisan: Upstream strategies- how best can researchers and public health practitioners work together to develop, implement and evaluate the effectiveness of upstream oral health improvement strategies? Dr. Amjad Matouq: Promoting oral health advocacy - what opportunities exist at local, national and international levels in developing oral health advocacy activities? Dr. Salahudeen AlBulushi: Future research priorities -what are the future priorities in oral health inequalities research? What are the training needs for the next generation of dental researchers to equip them to work effectively on inequalities agenda? IADR-WHO Symposium
  40. 40. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 41 Dr. Keivan Saati, DDS, MS Specialist in Restorative Dentistry Assistant Professor Azad Dental University, Dental Branch, Iran All About Bleaching Dental bleaching, also known as tooth whitening, is a common procedure in general dentistry. According to the FDA, whitening restores natural tooth color and bleaching whitens beyond the natural color. There are many methods available, such as brushing, bleaching strips, bleaching pen, bleaching gel, and laser bleaching. Bleaching methods use carbamide peroxide which reacts with water to form hyDr. ogen peroxide. Carbamide peroxide has about a third of the strength of hyDr.ogen peroxide.. The peroxide oxidizing agent penetrates the porosities in the rod-like crystal structure of enamel and breaks down stain deposits in the dentin. Causes of tooth discoloration : A child’s deciduous teeth are generally whiter than the adult teeth that follow. As a person ages the adult teeth often become darker due to changes in the mineral structure of the tooth, as the enamel becomes less porous and phosphate-deficient. Teeth can become stained by bacterial pigments, food- goods and vegetables rich with carotenoids or xanthonoids. Certain antibacterial medications (like tetracycline) can cause teeth stains Other causes: Tetracyclines Enamel hypoplasia Fluorosis Age of the tooth Tea Coffee Tobacco ( tar ) Mate Wine and cola Dr.inks consumed in excess Other foods and oral tobacco products with strong content of pigments Chlorhexidine Method :According to the American Dental Association, different whitening methods include in-office bleaching, which is applied by a professional dentist; at-home bleaching, which is used at home by the patient; over-the-counter, which is applied by patients The ADA recommends to have one’s teeth checked by a dentist before undergoing any whitening method. The dentist should examine the patient thoroughly: take a health and dental history observe hard and soft tissues, placement and conditions
  41. 41. 42 of restorations, and sometimes x-rays to determine the nature and depth of possible irregularities. . Bleaching is not recommended if teeth have decay or infected gums. It is least effective when the original tooth color is grayish and may require custom bleaching trays. Bleaching is most effective with yellow discolored teeth. In-office : In-office bleaching procedures generally use a light-cured protective layer that is carefully painted on the gums and papilla to reduce the risk of chemical burns to the soft tissues. The bleaching gel typically contains between 10% and 44% carbamide peroxide, which is roughly equivalent to a 3% to 16% hyDr.ogen peroxide concentration. Internal bleaching :Internal bleaching procedures are performed on devitalized teeth that have undergone endodontic treatment (a.k.a. “Root Canal”) but are discolored due to internal staining of the tooth structure by blood and other fluids that leaked in. Bleaching the tooth internally involves Dr.illing a hole to the pulp chamber, cleaning, sealing, and filling the root canal with a rubber-like substance, and placing a peroxide gel or sodium perborate tetrahyDr.ate into the pulp chamber so they can work directly inside the tooth on the dentin layerIn this variation of whitening the whitening agent is sealed within the tooth over a period of some days and replaced as needed, the so-called “walking bleach” technique At-home :Commercial whitening products intended for home use include gels, chewing gums, rinses, toothpastes, among others. The ADA has published a list of accepted over-the-counter whitening products to help people choose appropriate whitening products. High-concentrationhomebleachingusescarbamideperoxide.Whiteningisperformed by applying a high concentration of oxidizing agent to the teeth with thin plastic trays for a short period of time, which produces quick results. The application trays ideally should be well-fitted to retain the bleaching gel, ensuring even and full tooth exposure to the gel. Trays will typically stay on the teeth for about 15–20 minutes. Trays are then removed and the procedure is repeated up to two more times. Low-concentration whitening is far less effective. Low-concentration whitening involves purchasing a thin mouth guard or strip that holds a relatively low concentration of oxidizing agent next to the teeth for as long as several hours a day for a period of 5 to 14 days. Results can vary, depending on which application is chosen, with some people achieving whiter teeth in a few days, and others seeing very little results or no results at all. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book
  42. 42. Oral & Poster Presentation Abstracts in order of ID numbers
  43. 43. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 44 181423 Biomimetic Synthetic Enamel: A Potential Remineralizing Agent for Enamel Repair H. BAGHERI G1 , F. SHAFIEI2 , T.S. JAFARZADEH KASHI3 , and M. BEHROOZIBAKHSH3 , 1 Institue for research in Dental Sciences/School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, 2 Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, 3 Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Currently, remineralizing agents are being considered as a preventive strategy to stop the mineral loss process and to alter the oral conditions toward remineralization. Up to now, fluoride or calcium phosphate containing systems have been introduced to remineralize the defected enamel tissue. Recently polypeptides have been used for regulation of the mineralization process. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulatory capacity of leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP) on the calcium phosphate mineralization. Methods: Mineralization solutions were prepared to yield final concentration of 2.5 mM Ca+2 , 1.5 mM phosphate, and 2 mg/ml LRAP (GL Biochem China) (pH=7.2). 1 ppm F- was added to the selected solutions to study the effect of fluorine ion. Calcium phosphate or fluorine-containing (1 ppm) solutions were used as the controls. The solutions were incubated at 37°C for 72 h. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and selected electron area diffraction (SAED) techniques were used to study the mineralization characteristics. Results: SAED analysis revealed diffraction patterns corresponding to the apatite structure in all solutions. TEM analysis showed that in LRAP-containing solutions fibers of hydroxyapatite or fluoroapatite arranged in bundles, while in solutions without LRAP, the crystallization occurred without that arrangement. AFM imaging showed the hierarchical prismatic assembly of HA and FA crystals, similar to the enamel structure. Conclusions: LRAP can regulate the crystallization of calcium phosphate and produce prismatic structures like dental enamel. Therefore, LRAP-CP has the potential to be used as a remineralizing agent for enamel reconstruction.
  44. 44. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 45 181508 Adherence of Iranian Dentists to Information Technology S. MOHEBBI, M. BONABI, M.R. EBRAHIMPOUR, M. SAHEBJAMEE, and A.J. ABBASI, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: In the health field, there have been fast development and expansion of use of information and communication technology (ICT) such as navigation portals, telemedicine and dentistry, remote medicine and dentistry, and patient data-storing. This study aimed to assess the knowledge and usage of professional IT applications among dentists. Methods: The data were collected by a self-administered validated questionnaire distributed among dentists participating in the 52nd International Congress of Iranian Dental Association and a random sample of dentists working in Tehran. It included 7 questions about knowledge, 8 questions on backgrounds, 10 questions on general usage of IT, and 3 questions on the professional usage of IT. The data were entered into SPSS version 18 and the statistical analyses were performed by ANOVA, NPAR test, and regression modeling. Results: From the total of 303 general practitioners, 30.4% were male and 11 dentists (3.6%) indicated that they had no access to a personal computer. Some of the most popular sites used by dentists were Google (94.3%) and social network of Facebook (69.8%). Those with higher scores in general usage of IT had more consulted with their patients through the Internet. The practice of professional IT was more in men and among those with higher general usage of IT. Conclusions: This study was a preliminary evaluation of the topic among oral health professions indicating IT to be almost available to most but not all dentists in Iran. Dentists participating in the study had insufficient knowledge and their professional IT usage is defective and weak, needing more consideration and training.
  45. 45. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 46 181684 Fracture Resistance of Posts in Full-Coverage Restorations of Primary Incisors A. BAGHALIAN1 , M. RANJPOUR2 , T. HOOSHMAND3 , and A. EBRAHIMI2 , 1 Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, 2 Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran, 3 School of Dentistry/ Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of 4 different posts in full-coverage restorations of severely decayed primary incisors. Methods: 50 primary incisors were selected for this study and all the teeth were sectioned 1 mm above the CEJ. After filing and irrigation of root canal space, the canals were obturated with metapex and 3 mm of post space was prepared inside the canals. Intact glass fiber post, split-ended glass fiber post, composite resin post, and orthodontic wire γ post were used as intracanal posts. The final composite resin restoration was done by using pedodontic strip crown. After thermocycling the specimens, the fracture resistance was measured using a universal testing machine. Results: The mean fracture resistance of split-ended glass fiber posts was higher than that of other posts; however, there was no significant difference between any of the groups (P>0.05). Conclusions: Split-ended glass fiber posts seem to be a more appropriate option for full-coverage restorations in primary incisors.
  46. 46. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 47 182551 Human and Animal Bone Substitutes for Augmentation before Implant Placement A. KESHVAD, Shahed University, School of Clinical Dentistry, Tehran, Iran, and T. HOOSHMAND, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare 2 commercially available human and animal derived bone grafts to augment partially edentulous human bone prior to implant placement for those volunteers with insufficient host bone. Methods: According to the exclusion and inclusion criteria, 12 healthy volunteers (6 in each group) who accepted our protocol and consented for the study were selected. Similar or identical bone particle sizes were selected from the two products, namely Bio-Oss™ (as an animal derived bone) and Faraz-Kish™ (as a human derived bone), in each surgical approach to augment the partially edentulous areas that had insufficient width or height for placing implants of 10 mm or more. The decision of bone quantity was based on the cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) obtained in one center by only one radiologist. One edentulous area for each patient on the same jaw was left non-grafted to act as a control group and one edentulous area was grafted with one material for comparison. Xenograft and allograft groups were compared with each other and with their corresponding control groups using before and after values reported on the digital CBCTs. Results: To obtain post grafting results, 6 months laps’ period was considered as a proper time before the grafted area was subjected to control CBCT. This and the number of subjects necessary to draw a conclusion took 3 years for the study to complete. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Walis test and the level of significance was set at P<0.05. The results showed significant differences between the grafted and non-grafted areas. Comparison between the xeno and allografts also showed significant differences in the amount of bone obtained after grafting. Conclusions: Human derived bone grafts showed better bone quality and quantity after 6 months of grafting as opposed to animal derived bone substitutes.
  47. 47. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 48 182850 Bone Debris vs. Allografts in Repairing Implant Buccal Bone Dehiscence A. PARHIZ, and M. JAFAR GHOLIZADEH, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran Objectives:Assessmentofsuccessrateofuseofbonedebrisandallograftbiomaterial in reducing gingival complications in implants in which some threads are exposed. Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 17 patients (9 male, 8 female) and 30 implants, with collar thread exposure, were entered. Patients with systemic disease (even controlled disease) and poor oral hygiene were excluded. Selection of grafted material for each patient was done randomly using flash cards. After implantation and putting the grafted material on the exposed threads, a collagen membrane was put on it and the surgical site was sutured tightly. In 14 implants bone debris was used and in 16 implants allografts (DBA+MBA, TBI) to cover the exposed threads. The second stage was done at least 2 months later. To save the keratinized gingiva, the tissue punch was not used. Three and 12 months after cementing the crown, three clinical complications were assessed: Collar exposure, Thread exposure, Metal shadow Results: Data were analyzed using SPSS software, Pearson Chi-square test, and Fisher’s Exact test. In the first follow-up there was no complication. In the second follow-up, there was thread exposure in three implants (18.8%) of allograft group which was not seen in the bone debris group. However, these differences were not statistically significant (P=0.228). There was metal shadow in two implants (14.3%) of bone debris group after 12 months while it was seen only in one implant (6.3%) of allograft group. This difference was not statistically significant (P=0.586). Collar exposure was seen in seven implants (50%) of bone debris group and (43.8%) of allograft group. This difference was not significant either. Conclusions: Although results of using bone debris and allograft had no statistical difference, in 14 (46.6%) implants one of the mentioned complications arose.
  48. 48. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 49 182855 Role of Titanium Mesh in Reconstruction of Ridge Deficiencies O. MOGHADDAS, Islamic Azad University, Dental Branch, Tehran, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Sufficient quality and quantity of bone is mandatory for achieving success in implant dentistry from biomechanical and esthetic points of view. Methods: 25 patients (16 male, 9 female) with horizontal and vertical deficiencies enrolled in this study. Titanium mesh plus freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) were utilized to augment the deficient areas. Evaluations were done at baseline (pre-op) and 8 months after, during a reentry surgery for implant placement with periodontal probes and caliper. Independent t-test was used to compare the differences. Results: Bone graft materials were almost completely incorporated with the vital bone and mean gain in width of 4.6 mm and in height of about 3.2 mm were achieved. Conclusions: Utilizing titanium mesh with low turnover rate bone grafts is a good alternative with great tissue compatibility, low risk of contamination and easy handling, especially in advanced cases.
  49. 49. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 50 182883 Reverse Contrast Digital Radiography in Root Fracture Diagnosis F. FARSHCHI, Azad Dental University, Tehran, Iran Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic precision of reverse contrast option from Cygnus Ritter CCD Intra-oral Digital sensor, compared to original digital radiographs, in detection of vertical root fracture. Methods: 100 extracted single-rooted human teeth (50 non-fractured and 50 fractured) were placed singly in a skull socket. The radiographs were taken in 2 methods: Digital radiographs using a Cygnus Ritter CCD sensor and then reverse contrast option was applied to the original radiographs. 2 maxillofacial radiologists and an endodontist observed the original digital radiographs and their reverse contrast option counterparts to detect vertical root fractures and recorded them in a 5-grade scale. The data were analyzed with a proportion test and processed with SPSS 14. Results: Statistical analysis showed a sensitivity of 84.7% with CI: 95% for the Reverse contrast option to detect vertical root fractures (P>0.05). The specificity was shown as 61.3% (P>0.05). The Positive Predictive Value was calculated as 77.8% (P>0.05) and Negative Predictive Value as 68.6% (P>0.05).The Accuracy was 73% (P>0.05) Conclusions: The Reverse contrast option of Cygnus Ritter CCD Sensor did not show a significantly higher diagnostic accuracy compared to original digital radiographs made with that sensor.
  50. 50. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 51 182884 The Effect of OTC Bleaching Products on Enamel Microhardness N. NOURBAKHSH1 , E. JAFARPOUR1 , and S. NEMATI ANARAKI2 , 1 Islamic Azad Dental university of Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2 Islamic Azad Dental university, Tehran, Iran Objectives: OTC bleaching materials which have been accepted in society may affect properties of enamel microhardness. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of three kinds of OTC bleaching materials (White strip, paint on, and toothpaste) one enamel microhardness of human third molar before and after bleaching treatment. Methods: In this experimental study of enamel specimens, 45 freshly extracted human third molar were prepared and divided in to three groups of white strips, paint on, and toothpaste. Each material was used according to the manufacturers (Crest and Rapidwhite) instructions. Vickers microhardness test was performed for all groups. Data were analyzed by repeated measure ANOVA and LSD test. Results: Microhardness values of white strips, paint on, and tooth paste groups before and after bleaching treatment were 305.60±51.70 and 289.20±54.24/286.53 ±62.10&276.13±61.75/256.60±39.77&253.06±38.62, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed significant differences among three OTC groups (P<0.001). There was also significant difference among the value of enamel microhardness before and after the bleaching in each group (P<0.001). Conclusions: Whitening OTC products affect enamel microhardness. White strips and paint on decreased the microhardness more than whitening toothpaste. Consumers should be aware of these OTC products side effects and use them conservatively.
  51. 51. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 52 182902 Effect of GC Tooth Mousse and MI Paste Plus on Dental Plaque Acidity H. HESHMAT, Department of Restorative Dentistry and Dental Materials, Islamic Azad University Dental Branch, Tehran, Iran, Tehran, Iran, H. ABDIAN, Dentist, Tehran, Iran, and F. FARAJI, School of Dentistry,Islamic Azad University.Tehran.Iran, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Reduction in plaque pH after consuming sugary materials is effective in dissolving minerals on enamel surface. Casein phosphopeptid-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (GC Tooth Mousse), is a paste with available type of Calcium Phosphate rather than ions of calcium and phosphate that is in the saliva. The new composition of this paste called MI Paste Plus is presented with 900 ppm fluoride (CPP-ACPF). Utilizing this paste can help neutralize the pH of bacterial plaque. In this study the effect of CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF were evaluated on neutralizing the plaque pH during different times. Methods: This clinical study has been done on 40 students. Plaque acidity (pH) at distal of first molar were evaluated before and 10 minutes after 10% sucrose consumption. In the next step, CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes were used as directed on tooth surface. Plaque pH was assessed 30 and 60 minutes, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after application, data were recorded and analyzed by Repeated Measure ANOVA statistical method (P<0/05) . Results: Both CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF increased plaque pH levels, identically for the first 48 hours. The pattern differed after this period. Conclusions: The effect of CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF were identical until 48 hours, but CPP-ACPF can be increased the pH until 96 hours.
  52. 52. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 53 182903 Porcelain Laminate Fracture Resistance on Incisal Reduction less than 2mm E. AMINSALEHI, K. SAATI, A. DARNAHAL, and S. NEJAD KARIMI, Islamic Azad University Dental Center, Tehran, Iran Objectives: In the past decade, the demand for more durable and esthetic anterior restoration like porcelain laminate veneer has increased. The main reason for failure in this treatment is porcelain fracture. Therefore, tooth preparation plays an important role in fracture resistance of porcelain laminate veneer. Obviously proper choice of incisal reduction is an important factor to increase fracture resistance. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of porcelain laminate veneer dependent on the size of incisal reduction at less than 2 millimeter. Methods: In this experimental study, 40 caries-free maxillary central incisors were divided into four groups (n=10). While the control group remained unprepared, in the second, third, and fourth groups the preparation included 1 mm, 1.5 mm and 2 mm of incisal edge respectively. 30 feldespatic ceramic veneers were bonded by light cure luting cement (Choice 2). After that, specimens were loaded by universal testing machine under increasing force (1 mm/min cross head speed – 135 force angle degree) 0.5 mm lower than incisal edge until fracture was accrued. Finally, fracture loads were recorded on newton unit. Results: The mean fracture forces for control, 1 mm, 1.5 mm and 2 mm groups were 1089.4±276.49, 921.56±399.78, 894.46 ± 538.35, and 877.28±371.5 respectively. Besides, cohesive fracture in second, third, and fourth groups were 6, 6, and 4 respectively. Also, adhesive fractures (between cement and porcelain) were 1, 1, and 2 and adhesive fractures (between cement and tooth) were 3, 2, and 3 respectively. However, in third and fourth groups one crack in porcelain without fracture was seen. Conclusions: Under limitations of this study from fracture resistance point of view there was no significant difference between control group and the three other groups (P>0.05).
  53. 53. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 54 182909 Effect of Fluoride and Chlorhexidine Varnishes on Interproximal Plaque pH S. BANAVA1 , S. ASKARZADEH2 , D. NIKNAM3 , and S. ABDOLLAHZADEH2 , 1 Islamic Azad University Dental Branch, Tehran, Iran, 2 Dental Branch , Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran, 3 Islamic Azad University Dental Center, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Dental plaque characteristics are responsible for occurrence of dental caries. If the plaque pH reduces to 5.2-5.5 the demineralization procedure will start. Increasing the plaque pH could be effective on slowing down the demineralization process. The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride and chlorhexidine varnishes on plaque pH of children aged 2-15 years old. Methods: In this triple-blind randomized controlled clinical trial 46 children aged 2-15 who met the inclusion criteria entered the study and were divided into two age groups of 2-6 and 6-15 by Stratified Randomization. Participants were randomly allocated in the three following groups: Group 1 (Control): No varnish application, Group 2: Chlorhexidine varnish (Cervitec Plus, Ivoclar V), and Group 3: Fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector, Sultan Healthcare Inc, USA). In the first session, the baseline pH of inter-proximal dental plaque of all participants was measured by pH Plaque Indicator Kit (GC America, USA) and then the related varnishes were applied according to the manufacturer instructions in each group. The application of varnishes was done by dental floss into the proximal surfaces. After 1 and 3 months, the interproximal plaque pH was measured again. The data were analyzed by Kruskal wallis test and set to 0.05. Results: Statistical analysis showed that once application of none of the varnishes could change the interproximal plaque pH significantly in different groups and different times (P>0.05). Conclusions: Applying fluoride varnish or chlorhexidine varnish did not cause any changes in the interproximal pH plaque in different groups in comparison to the control group. Varnish application of more than once is recommended and needs further research.
  54. 54. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 55 182913 The Role of HIV Infection on Oral Pigmentation S. LESAN, M. SADAT KHODAEI, M.A. OUSIA, A. AZIZI, and A. NAJAFPOUR, Islamic Azad University,Dental branch,Tehran,Iran, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Diffuse or Multifocal Mucocutaneous pigmentation has been frequently described as a clinical feature of HIV+/AIDS person. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of HIV+/AIDS on oral pigmentation in Tehran Imam Khomeini hospital’s patients and their control group during 2009-2010. Methods: In this historical cohort study (cross sectional study) 35 HIV+ patients (case group) and 35 HIV- patients (control group) who referred to the infectious, surgery, or gynecology department of Tehran Imam Khomeini hospital were examined and evaluated. Both groups were matched for age, sex, cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, OCP using, and pregnancy. The study was done by observation, clinical examination, and interviewing the patients in addition to reviewing their medical files and completing the questionnaire. Oral pigmentation was recorded. The data were analyzed by chi-squared, exact fisher test. Results: In this study 70 individuals were examined which were equally divided into case and control groups. The prevalence of oral pigmentation was 22.9% (N=8) in the case group and 17.1% (N=6) in the control group. The prevalence of melanin pigmentation in control group was less than healthy individuals but there was no statistically significant difference between the case and control group (P=0.5). Conclusions: Since there was no significant difference in oral pigmentation in HIV+ and HIV- patients, it can be concluded that in this study, HIV infection does not have any role on oral pigmentation.
  55. 55. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 56 182923 Clinical Effectiveness of Laser on Postoperative Hypersensitivity H.-. MOOSAVI1 , F.-. MALEKNEJAD2 , M.-. SHARIFI1 , and F.-. AHRARI1 , 1 Dental Materials Research Center, Mashhad, Iran, 2 Dental Material Research Center, Mashhad, Iran Objectives: Postoperative hypersensitivity may be one of the drawbacks of every tooth operation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Indium Gallium Aluminum Arsenide Phosphate laser on postoperative hypersensitivity in cervical lesions. Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 31 patients were included. Teeth were assigned randomly two groups of with or without irradiation by laser. In the experimental group the same clinical procedure was used as the control group, except applying laser emission before filling. Self-etch adhesive; Clearfil SE Bond, was applied and cavities restored with composite resin; Clearfil APX. Preoperative and 1-day, 2-, and 4-week-postoperative hypersensitivity were recorded for both groups using an 11-point visual analog scale filled out by subjects. The analyses were conducted to determine whether any correlation or association existed between with or without laser irradiation during several follow-ups. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxson and Friedman test. Results: Laser irradiation had a significantly higher desensitizing effect compared with the control group after treatment. Significant differences were observed between the laser and control groups at every follow-up examination. For the laser and control group, the differences between baseline and all time points following the treatment were statistically significant. Conclusions:Laserirradiationisaneffectivemethodinthereductionofpostoperative sensitivity compared with non-irradiated treatment.
  56. 56. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 57 182924 Degree of Conversion of Low-Shrinkage Composites Photo-Activated by LED and Halogen T. HOOSHMAND, School of Dentistry/Research Center for Science and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, K. FAMILI, School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, and A. KESHVAD, Shahed University, School of Clinical Dentistry, Tehran, Iran Objectives: To assess and compare the degree of conversion and micohardness of different resin-based restorative materials consisting of conventional methacrylate- based, silorane-based, and new urethane dimethacrylate-based composites as a function of light curing units (Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) and Light Emitting Diode (LED)). Methods: To obtain the specimens, a circular matrix of stainless steel was used. Composite materials (Tetric Nceram, Filtek Silorane and Kalore GC) were put into the mold and pressed under 500 gr siker. The specimens were cured by either Bluephase LED for 20 s, or Coltolux halogen for 40 s. Degree of conversion was measured using FT-IR spectroscopy. Vickers microhardness of top and bottom surfaces was also evaluated. To compare the degree of conversion and microhardness between composites, Kruskall-Wallis test and pairwise comparison were used. Mann-Whitney U test was used for comparison of efficacy between the two light curing units. Results: The degree of conversion or microhardness between bottom and top surfaces of all test groups were significant (P<0.05). The degree of conversion or microhardness for all the specimens polymerized by LED was significantly higher than that of halogen (P<0.05). Filtek Silorane exhibited a better degree of polymerization compared with that of other composites polymerized either by QTH or LED light (P<0.05). Conclusions: Silorane-based composite showed a better degree of polymerization than that of other methacrylate-based composites. The degree of conversion and Vickers microhardness were affected by the type of resin composite material, light curing units, and curing depths.
  57. 57. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 58 182926 Investigation of Implant Width on Distribution of Stress in Adjacent Bone E. JAFARPOUR1 , N. NOURBAKHSH1 , and E. JALALIAN2 , 1 Azad university of dentistry of Tehran, Tehran, Iran, 2 Islamic Azad University Dental Center, Tehran, Iran Objectives: Implant width has a significant role in distribution of stress and many different studies have suggested different outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum width of implant for distribution of stress. Methods: The current experimental research was implemented using photo elastic method with wide variety of implant width including 3.3,3.7,5,6, 3.5 mm and similar length equal to 10 mm. Plexiglass block with the same length and height of 33.5 and 35 mm and different width of implant were prepared so as there would be 1.5 mm width around each implant. They were placed under the force of 157 and 65 N in 90 and 30 degree angles respectively by photo elastic device. The obtained images were assimilated using Photoshop 650 x 760 and evaluated by image. Results: Using the image J software colored analyzed images were obtained. The analysis procedure was based on three color (red –white –blue) separation technique. Three color separations resulted in a more investigation of spots which later categorized into stress focused, stress free and modest stress groups. The highest amount of stress focus was associated to 6 mm depth, 30 degree angle and under 100 N force with partial fraction of ¼ or 25/100 and the lowest amount of stress focus was associated with 3.7 mm depth, 90 degree angle and under the N force. Conclusions: With the increase of implant depth from 3.2 to 5 mm, the stress amount of adjacent bone decreased and with increase in stress occurred. In the case of using higher depth, the optimum depth seems to be 5 mm.
  58. 58. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 59 182929 Quality Assessment of the Information Related to Fissure Sealant F. NILCHIAN, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Esfahan, Iran, and L. GHASEMI, University of Isfahan, Isfahan, Iran Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of information related to pit and fissure sealant in general Persian Internet websites. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, by searching in Google engine, the websites providing information about fissure sealant were found. The key words were “patient education and fissure sealant”, checked by MeSH database. From 500 initial links, the inadequate ones were eliminated according to exclusion criteria, and 37 websites remained. These websites were evaluated through a checklist designed by the researchers, the validity and reliability of which had been evaluated and confirmed. Results: The average score of the quality of information was 22.46. The minimum and maximum of obtained scores were 16 and 30, respectively. The total and ideal number was 38. Conclusions: Overall the quality of information related to fissure sealant in general Internet sources was good, yet they did not cover the entire required information which could be improved. The main problem of information was that they did not provide creditable/credible and up-to-date sources.
  59. 59. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 60 182944 Formulation of New Mucoadhesive Containing Phenytoin on Wound Healing S. ALIREZAEI, resident, tehran, Iran, and M. BAHARVAND, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives:Severalstudieshaveshownthewoundhealingeffectoftopicalphenytoin, which is applied by its effect on connective tissue intracellular matrix. However, there are still some controversies about its effect on various kinds of wounds. This study evaluated the effect of mucoadhesive paste compared to phenytoin mucoadhesive paste on wound healing after oral biopsy. The importance of this study is that no systemic treatment is used; therefore, side effects of such a treatment. Methods: This study was a randomized double blind clinical trial. Parameters included age, gender, tissue inflammation, degree of pain, and size of the ulcer. After entering the study, patients were randomized into two groups. Both groups had oral biopsy ulcers ranging between one and two centimeters. Patients in the first group were treated by simple mucoadhesive paste, while patients in the second group were treated by phenytoin mucoadhesive paste. Both pastes were applied for 5 days after the biopsy. Statistical analysis was done using Mann-Whitney test. Results: After the second and third appointments, it was observed that the rate of wound healing and decrease in the size of the ulcers were significantly quicker in the second group (P=0.001 and P=0.003 respectively) and the patients in the second group reported less pain. Diameter of the inflammatory halo was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusions: Applying phenytoin mucoadhesive paste on biopsy ulcers resulted in accelerated wound healing and decrease in pain, but had no effect on the diameter of the inflammatory halo.
  60. 60. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 61 182961 Residual Root Thickness Evaluation after Pre-Flaring Using Gates Glidden Drills N. MOHAMMADZADEH AKHLAGHI1 , A. NAGHDI2 , L. MOHAMMADIAN2 , and E. BEHROUZ2 , 1 Islamic Azad University Dental Branch, Tehran, Iran, 2 Islamic Azad University Dental Center, Tehran, Iran Objectives: To evaluate the residual root thickness in mesiolingual (ML) canals of mandibular molars after pre-flaring using different sequences of Gates-Glidden (GG) drills. Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans of the ML canals of 60 mandibular first molars were provided from areas within 1, 2, 3, and 4 mm of the furcation area and minimum initial root thickness (MIRT) of concave areas was measured at each level. The samples were divided into two groups (G1 and G2) which were prepared by the step-back and crown-down techniques, respectively. In both groups, anti-curvature filing was used. On secondary CT images of the samples in the same position, the minimum residual root thickness (MRRT) and the amount of removed dentin were analyzed by t-test and ANOVA. Results: There was no significant difference for MIRT between the two groups. The MRRT was greater in the G2 group in all the sections, with no significant difference between them. The average of MRRT was not less than 0.5 mm in any of the groups or sections. Conclusions: Based on the results of this study when the root thickness is appropriate at first, GG drills used in any sequence may be suitable, safe, and cost effective for pre-flaring of mesial canals of mandibular first molars with preserving the root thickness of furcation areas.
  61. 61. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 62 182962 Effects of bonding agent and sealant viscosity  on sealant microleakage S. SADEGHI, Assistant professor, Department of Orthodontics, Kerman Dental School, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran, F. MAZHARI, Associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, Mashhad Dental School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran, and M. MEHRABKHANI, Assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, Mashhad Dental School, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran Objectives: Pit and fissures are susceptible to caries and this accounts for approximately 80-90% of all permanent posterior teeth decay. Sealant placement culminates in a 80% caries reduction after one year. An issue of concern in dentistry is proper sealing following sealant placement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of enamel bonding agent, dentin bonding agent, and sealant viscosity on sealant microleakage occurrence. Methods: 60 extracted human premolars were randomly divided into two equal groups and each group was divided to three subgroups of 10 teeth. In Group 1, Subgroup 1 after prophylaxis, enameloplasty, etching of occlusal surfaces with 38% phosphoric acid gel, rinsing and drying, low viscosity sealant was applied and cured. Group 1, Subgroup 2 received enamel bonding agent prior to low viscosity sealant placement and cured. In Group 1, Subgroup 3 before low viscosity sealant placement, dentin bonding agent was applied and cured. In Group 2 similar procedures were performed except for applying high viscosity sealant. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles at 5°C and 55°C with dwell time of 10 second. Microleakage was scored according to distance of dye penetration as: 0 = no dye penetration and 3 = dye penetrates to underlying fissure. Results: Statistical Analysis showed significant effect of sealant viscosity and bonding agent on the microleakage scores (P=0.037). There was no significant difference between dentin bonding agent and enamel bonding agent and no bonding agent subgroups in the microieakage scores in both groups. Significant differences between low viscosity sealant without applying bonding agent subgroup and high viscosity sealant without applying bonding agent subgroup (P=0.041), and between dentin bonding agent in low viscosity and high viscosity sealant subgroups (P=0.002) were found. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that concurrent use of low viscosity sealant and dentin bonding agent reduces the microleakage of pit and fissures.
  62. 62. 9th Iranian & 13th Kuwaiti Divisions of IADR Joint Congress, 11-13 Dec 2013 - Abstract Book 63 182963 Accuracy of Two Radiographic Methods in Diagnosis of Root Resorption A. MESGARANI, and M. EHSANI, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Dentistry of Babol, Babol, Iran Objectives: The aim of the current study was to evaluate the diagnosis accuracy of external root resorption with conventional intraoral film radiography, CCD sensor, and PSP sensor. Methods: This in vitro study was performed on 80 extracted human sound premolars. Artificial external root resorption were simulated using 0.8 mm, 1 mm, 1.2 mm, and 1.4 mm diameter round burs by drilling to the entire depth at apical half of the mesial, distal, and buccal surface. Two dosages of radiography were used (0.16 and 0.08 second in the conventional radiography, 0.08 and 0.04 in the digital radiography).Three observers (one radiologist and two endodontists) examined the images. Data were statistically analyzed by SPSS 17 software. Results: Higher proportion of correct reading were obtained with the CCD receptor (P=0.39). The best results were obtained when surfaces were without resorption (P=0.001).The observers detected more cases with increasing the dose of radiography and the size of cavity. Conclusions: The CCD sensor was better than conventional intraoral film radiography and conventional radiography is better than PSP sensor in detecting external root resorption, although, there is no significant difference.

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