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Draft Admin Report 2011/2012

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Draft Admin Report 2011/2012

  1. 1. Admin Report 2011-20121
  2. 2. A publication of the Educational Planning Division, Ministry of Education Layout and design by the Corporate Communications Division, Ministry of Education © Ministry of Education, June 2013 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or redistributed in any form without the prior written permission of the publishers.
  3. 3. I know of no more encouraging fact than the unquestionable ability of man to elevate his life by conscious endeavour - Henry Thoreau “ ” Foreword FPO A w a i t i n g M i n i s t e r ’ s Speech
  4. 4. Admin Report 2011-2012 2 A w a i t i n g M i n i s t e r ’ s Speech
  5. 5. Admin Report 2011-20123 Contents FOREWORD 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 10 INTRODUCTION 13 CHAPTER 1: DESIGN AND DEVELOP A QUALITY EDUCATION SYSTEM 16 1. Integrating Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Education- eCal Laptop Initiative 17 2. Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) 21 3. Improving Infrastructure in Schools 24 4. Curriculum Reform 26 5. Enhanced Literacy and Numeracy 26 6. Movement of Secondary Entrance Assessment (SEA) from March to May 26 7. Expansion of the Technical/Vocational Programme 27 8. Teaching and Teacher Development 29 9. Improving Students Overall Academic Performance 30 10. Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children 38 11. Continuous Assessment 40 12. Career Guidance and Development in Secondary Schools 40 13. Social Programmes 41 CHAPTER 2: TRANSFORMING THE MINISTRY INTO A HIGH PERFORMING ORGANIZATION 44 2.1 Organizational Restructuring and Institutional Strengthening 45 2.2 Human Resource Management and Strengthening 46 2.2.1 Staffing 46 Teaching Service 47 Civil Service 49 CHAPTER 3: ENGAGE STAKEHOLDERS IN THE CHANGE AND TRANSFORMATION PROCESS 52 3.1 Engaging Stakeholders 53 3.2 Community Participation 54 3.3 Consultation with ECCE Providers 56 CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL REVIEW 58 4.1 Recurrent Expenditure 59 4.2 Development Expenditure 62 CHAPTER 5: THE WAY FORWARD 64
  6. 6. Admin Report 2011-2012 4 List of Key Boxes, Tables and Figures LIST OF KEY BOXES Box 1: Priorities for the attainment of a Quality Education System 16 LIST OF KEY TABLES Table 1 Location of Nineteen (19) Early Childhood Care and Education Sites 22 Table 2 Number and Percentage of Students Placed in Secondary Schools by School Type: SEA 2008 – 2012 33 Table 3 Number and Percentage of Students invited to Repeat SEA: 2008 - 2012 34 Table 4 CSEC 2012: Number of students attaining five (5) or more subjects including Mathematics and English A at government and government assisted secondary schools 36 Table 5 CAPE Unit I and II – 2008 – 2012 [Grades I – IV] 37 Table 6 Pilot Schools re: Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children Project 39 Table 7 Distribution of meals by level and cost as at May 31st, 2012 42 Table 8 Ministry of Education’s Financial Allocation (2008 - 2012) 58 Table 9 Summary of Recurrent Expenditure for the Ministry of Education (2011 – 2012) 60 Table 10 Major recurrent expenditure under sub-heads for fiscal 2011 - 2012 61 Table 11 Summary of Development Expenditure for fiscal 2011 - 2012 63 Table 12 Budgetary Allocation of fiscal 2012 - 2013 64
  7. 7. Admin Report 2011-20125 LIST OF KEY FIGURES Figure 1 Education and Development System Model 9 Figure 2 Value Outcomes for our Children 14 Figure 3 Minister of Education Dr. the Honourable Tim Gopeesingh [centre] with students during thedistribution of laptops 17 Figure 4 Participants at ECCE Consultation 21 Figure 5 St. Barbara’s Spiritual Baptist Primary School 25 Figure 6 Arima New Government Primary School 25 Figure 7 Aranguez North Secondary School 25 Figure 8 Aranguez North Secondary School 25 Figure 9 Ministry’s Executive Team and Conference Presenters 30 Figure 10 The percentage of Students who registered for CSEC over the period 2011- 2012 35 Figure 11 The total number of Boys and Girls who wrote CSEC in 2012 35 Figure 12 CSEC 2012 – Grades I – III Awarded by Subject Entries 36 Figure 13 Ministry of Education Officials, CXC Officials and Students at Awards Ceremony 38 Figure 14 Celebrations at the Ministry of Education 50
  8. 8. Admin Report 2011-2012 6 Acronyms & Abbreviations AIDS Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome ASJA Anjuman Sunnat-Ul-Jamaat Association CAC Continuous Assessment Component CAPE Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination CARICOM The Caribbean Community CCETT Caribbean Centre of Excellence for Teacher Training COLA Cost of Living Allowance CSEC Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate CSO Central Statistical Office CVQs Caribbean Vocational Qualifications CXC Caribbean Examinations Council DERE Division of Educational Research and Evaluation eCal e-Connect and Learn ECCE Early Childhood Care and Education EFCL Education Facilities Company Limited EPD Educational Planning Division GCE A’Level General Certificate of Education – Advanced Level GCE O’Level General Certificate of Education – Ordinary Level GDP Gross Domestic Product GER Gross Enrolment Ratio GORTT Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago HIV Human Immuno-deficiency Virus IDB Inter-American Development Bank ICT Information and Communications Technology JBTE Joint Board of Teacher Education MOE Ministry of Education MOU Memorandum of Understanding NCSE National Certificate of Secondary Education
  9. 9. Admin Report 2011-20127 NEC National Examination Council NGOs Non-Governmental Organizations NOSTT National Open School of Trinidad and Tobago NPTA National Parent-Teacher Association NSDSL National Schools Dietary Services Limited NTA National Training Agency PISA Programme for International Student Assessment PMAP Performance Management and Appraisal Process PTA Parent-Teacher Association PTSC Public Transport Service Corporation SEED South Eastern Education District SESP Seamless Education System Programme SEA Secondary Entrance Assessment SEMP Secondary Education Modernization Programme SERVOL Service Volunteered for All SSSD Student Support Services Division SSTs School Support Teams TII/III Teacher II / III TEST Tertiary Education, Science and Technology TETPPU Teacher Education and Teacher Performance Project Unit TIA Tackveeyatul Islamic Association TML Trinidad Muslim League TTDD Teaching and Teacher Development Division TTUTA Trinidad and Tobago Unified Teachers’Association TVET Technical/Vocational, Education and Training TVI/II/III/IV Technical/Vocational Teacher I / II/ III/ IV UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation UTT University of Trinidad and Tobago VPA Violence Prevention Academy
  10. 10. Admin Report 2011-2012 8 Vision, Mission, Education and Development of the Child Vision The Ministry is a high performing and dynamic organization leading a quality education system that is responsive to the diverse needs of 21st century learners to contribute to the education and versatility of holistically developed children who are able to satisfy the human capital needs and sustainable development of society. Mission To educate and develop children who are: able to fulfil their full potential; healthy and growing normally; academically balanced; well-adjusted socially and culturally; and emotionally mature and happy.
  11. 11. Admin Report 2011-20129 9   andhappy. EducationandDevelopmentoftheChild Figure1:EducationandDevelopmentSystemModel       Figure1:EducationandDevelopmentSystemModel
  12. 12. Admin Report 2011-2012 10 O ver the last two and a half years the Ministry of Education on behalf of the government ofTrinidad andTobago laid a strong foundation for the re-engineering of the education system. Guided by its Education Sector Strategic Plan 2011-2015 and the sixteen priorities for the development of the education system,the Ministry has sought to build a quality system on the blocks of transparency, accountability and collaboration with stakeholders and the general public. Through the process of people participation and collaboration, the Ministry succeeded in implementing several initiatives outlined in its strategic plan and conceptualized under the sixteen priority areas. Executive Summary
  13. 13. Admin Report 2011-201211 By the close of fiscal 2011-2012, the Ministry had made significant progress in the majority of the priority areas which are highlighted here. The Laptop Initiative and eConnect and Learn Programme Represents a comprehensive set of projects, one of which is the distribution of laptops to students entering secondary schools. For the academic year 2012-2013, 17,058 laptops were distributed to Form I students who entered school in September 2012. As the eCal Programme continues to develop, students are being exposed to a wider array of information due to more educational software being made available to them. Ensuring the attainment of Universal Early Childhood Care and Education Work continued on the approaches adopted by theMinistrytoprovideuniversalearlychildhood care and education by 2015. However there were some challenges including the acquisition of sites and the leadership and functioning of the ECCE Unit for which the Ministry continued to seek solutions. Improving and expanding Teacher Training Teacher training remains critical to the success of the transformational initiatives such as changes in curricula and the expansion of educational opportunities for students. In collaboration with private tertiary institutions, plans are being developed for a comprehensive training programme for teachers. Work is ongoing in this area. Implementing Curriculum Reform Given the progress that was made during the last year it is envisioned that the new primary school curriculum will be ready for piloting in a number of schools by September, 2013. Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children The Ministry has commenced processes to implement a pilot exercise in sixteen (16) selected schools toward the formulation and application of the individualized treatment packages based on the initial screening, assessment and treatment of children from three (3) years old and upwards. Expanding the Caribbean Vocational Qualification Programme (CVQ) to all secondary schools The expansion of this programme is expected to increase the employability of persons by providing skills-based certification that has value in the world of work and also to ensure that all secondary school graduates exit secondary schools with evidence of a minimum of at least one (1) CVQ Regionally - Approved Occupational Standard (ROS). Improving infrastructure in schools The Ministry continues its efforts to provide safe and secure school buildings through new construction, installation of pre-engineered structures and refurbishment of existing school plant. Enhancing literacy and numeracy The underperformance of students in the areas of literacy and numeracy continues to engage the attention of the Ministry. A comprehensive literacy and numeracy strategy is being developed that will seek to improve students’ competencies in these key areas. Improving academic performance Thoseschoolsthatwereidentifiedasperforming below the national standard based on the results of the National Tests have been targeted and are to be provided with additional support. Through early intervention, underperformance
  14. 14. Admin Report 2011-2012 12 is being addressed by focusing on students in Infants Years One and Two and Standard One. Moving the Secondary Entrance Assessment Examination to May 2012 This was accomplished in collaboration with and support from key stakeholders. The examination was held on the 10th May, 2012 and was indeed a red-letter day in the history of the SEA. Continuous Assessment Programme (CAP) The Ministry will introduce a system of School-Based Assessment for primary school students. This will ensure that students are assessed over a period of time in subjects such as Physical Education; Visual and Performing Arts (Music, Visual Arts, Dance, Theatre); Citizenry Development; Health and Family Life Education; Social Studies; Agricultural- Science; Morals, Values and Ethics; Language Arts and Mathematics. This initiative will be introduced in the 2012-2013 academic year to Standard 4 and Standard 5 students. Introducing career guidance and development in secondary schools Work continued on a number of initiatives that will provide the required guidance and instruction to students that will assist in their career development and transition into the world of work. Ensuring organisational restructuring and institutional strengthening This involves developing institutional capability and capacity to effectively pursue the Vision, Mission, Strategic Objective and Value Outcomes for our children. To this end a new top organisational structure was approved by Cabinet. Developing and marketing the Ministry through a Corporate Communication Strategy The Communication Strategy is designed to improve the way the Ministry shares information, learns from others and collaborates with its stakeholders. It also reflects the Ministry’s approach to transparency, and public engagement. Developing and managing the human resources The effectiveness of the Ministry’s performance dependsnotonlyonavailableresourcesbutalso on the quality and competency of its human resources. The engagement of a Consultant to lead the transformation of the management of the Ministry’s human resources is currently being pursued. Engaging and involving parents and other key stakeholders Stakeholder and parent engagement is vital in order to effectively communicate with teachers, students, parents and the general public that are involved in public education. The Ministry has been able to gain the public’s trust and support to some extent for its transformation initiatives. It will continue to work aggressively in the future to build and sustain that trust. In the coming months the Ministry will continue to roll out its annual Business Plan for the period 2012/2013 with collaboration from its stakeholders as it seeks to build an Education System that offers hope and opportunities for our children.
  15. 15. Admin Report 2011-201213 T he Ministry of Education’s Annual Administrative Report presents the programmes, projects, initiatives and operations undertaken in the education system for the fiscal year 2011/2012. The achievements are the results of activities undertaken to implement the sixteen (16) priorities. The priority areas were identified in 2010 and since then the work started and has continued unabated. Much emphasis is placed on these areas sincetheyholdthekeytothetransformationandre-engineeringof the education system. Notwithstanding, there were key operations and functions that were executed during the last year that will be covered in this report. Introduction
  16. 16. Admin Report 2011-2012 14 At the heart of all that is done at the Ministry are the value outcomes for our children that will contribute to the development of the ideal child. Figure 2 below; highlights the characteristics of the ideal child coming out of the Education and Development process. Figure 2:Value Outcome for our Children All transformational initiatives to be pursued will be aligned towards the satisfaction of these Value Outcomes (Ref: Education Sector Strategic Plan 2011 – 2015]. The Annual Administrative Report 2011-2012 is structured around the Ministry’s three goals for the Education system and the respective priorities that will support the attainment of those goals. The goals are to:- 1. Design and Develop a Quality Education System. 2. Transform the Ministry into a Modern, High-Performing Organization. 3. Engage Stakeholders in the Transformation of the Education System The sixteen priority areas which are highlighted and expanded upon in the chapters which follow are expected to contribute to the attainment not only of these goals, but the value outcomes for our children, and ultimately the GORTT’s main developmental pillar – “People Centred Development. “ 13     achievements are the results of activities undertaken to implement the sixteen (16) priorities. The priority areas were identified in 2010 and since then the work started and has continued unabated. Much emphasis is placed on these areas since they hold the key to the transformation and re-engineering of the education system. Notwithstanding, there were key operations and functions that were executed during the last year that will be covered in this report. At the heart of all that is done at the Ministry are the value outcomes for our children that will contribute to the development of the ideal child. Figure 2 below; highlights the characteristics of the ideal child coming out of the Education and Development process. Figure 2: VALUE OUTCOMES FOR OUR CHILDREN All transformational initiatives to be pursued will be aligned towards the satisfaction of these Value Outcomes (Ref: Education Sector Strategic Plan 2011 – 2015]. The Annual Administrative Report 2011-2012 is structured around the Ministry’s three goals for the Education system and the respective priorities that will support the attainment of those goals.
  17. 17. Goal 1 Design and Develop a Quality Education System CHAPTER ONE
  18. 18. Admin Report 2011-2012 16 DesignandDevelopaQualityEducationSystem A quality education system will undoubtedly foster the social and economic development of the country and by extensiontheharmony,respect,disciplineandproduction needed for a cohesive society. As such the inputs and the processes that are inextricably linked to the making of a quality education system such as qualified teachers, new or improved school infrastructure and relevant curriculum, appropriate legislation, enabling teaching and learning environment etc are currently being addressed. These issues are being addressed through the Ministry’s sixteen priorities. Twelve priorities are aimed at improving the quality of the teaching and learning and directly support our goal to “Design and Develop a Quality Education System” Educational Priorities 1. Integrating ICTs in Education – Laptop Initiative 7. Expansion of the Technical Vocational Programme 2. Universal Early Childhood Care and Education 8. Teacher Training and Development 3. Improving Infrastructure in Schools 9. Improving Students Overall Academic Performance 4. Curriculum Reform 10. Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children 5. Enhanced Literacy and Numeracy 11. Continuous Assessment Programme 6. Movement of the Secondary Entrance Assessment to May 12. Career Guidance and Development in Secondary Schools. The last fiscal year saw steady progress towards fulfilling these priorities. The gains as well as challenges are reported accordingly. Box 1: Priorities for the attainment of a Quality Education System
  19. 19. Admin Report 2011-201217 1.1 Laptop Distribution The Ministry of Education has developed and implemented the eConnect and Learn (eCaL) Programme. The eCal programme was initiated in the year 2010. One of the major outcomes of the eCaL programme is transformation of Education in Trinidad and Tobago through the useofcontemporaryinstructionalstrategiesand cutting edge Information and Communication Technology (ICT) solutions. The goals of this Programme are to: i) improve the learning environment for students in an ever-changing information age; ii) improve the quality of instruction and support the infusion of ICT in teaching and learning and the development of 21st Century Skills in students; iii) reduce the inequity in access to computers and information between students from wealthy and poor families; iv) raise student achievement through specific interventions such as improving students’ understanding via the use of education software; and v) facilitate the development of collaboration between peers within schools, among schools and between teachers and students. 1. Integrating Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Education- eCaL Laptop Initiative Figure 3: Minister of Education Dr. the Honourable Tim Gopeesingh [centre] with students during the distribution of laptops
  20. 20. Admin Report 2011-2012 18 This Programme represents a comprehensive set of Projects, one of which is the distribution of Laptops to Students entering Secondary School. Over the three (3) years of existence of this eCaL Programme approximately fifty-five thousand (55,000) students and four thousand (4,000) teachers have been provided with laptops. Included in these figures, are the seventeen thousand and fifty-eight (17,058) laptops that were distributed to Form One students in 152 secondary schools for the academic year 2012/2013 which commenced on the 3rd September, 2012. All laptops were imaged with productivity and education software including but not limited to Microsoft Mathematics 4.0, Microsoft Chemistry Add-in for Word and Bing Maps. With the maturity and continuous improvement of this eCaL Programme students now have access to a wider array of information and learning resources for subject areas of the taught curriculum. 1.2 ICT Training for Teachers In support of this eCaL Programme, teachers are being encouraged and trained to develop ICT enhanced teaching strategies. This is necessary for the integration of ICTs into the curriculum and into classroom learning and instructional strategies. Teachers are charged with the responsibility to provide quality teaching in their classrooms while making creative use of the resources to develop 21st century skills in students. Thisisimportantasweseektoprepare our nation’s students to compete in an ICT driven global economy. During the three (3) year period of existence of the eCaL Programme, approximately eight thousand, four hundred (8,400) teachers were trained in a series of courses aimed at equipping staff with the necessary skills to infuse ICTs into their teaching and learning strategies. 1.3 Assessment of the eCal Programme In addition to the distribution of Laptops to students entering Form One, the eCal programme also comprised numerous other projects all geared toward achieving integration of ICTs into the curriculum and educational transformation. These other project initiatives included: 1. Laptop Rollout; 2. Expansion of Secondary Schools’ Connectivity; 3. Digital Portal; 4. Digital Resources and Content; 5. Policy and Guidelines; 6. Marketing and Communications; 7. Monitoring and Evaluation; 8. Teacher Training; and 9. Infusion of ICT into Curriculum Delivery. To ascertain the benefits derived from this Programmeaswellastheareasforimprovement, the Educational Research and Evaluation Division undertook an assessment of same in the year 2011. The survey was undertaken to determine the following: 1. ICT competence levels of key stakeholders, namely principals, teachers, students, parents; 2. The extent of use and access to technology;
  21. 21. Admin Report 2011-201219 3. Stakeholders knowledge and understanding of the Ministry’s ICT policies/guidelines; and 4. Stakeholders level of support for the eCal Programme. Along with the assessment, there was a Monitoring and Evaluation component which utilised an outcome-based framework for evaluation of the Programme. The outcomes of each Project stream were identified and used to develop questionnaires which were in turn re-administered to track changes, if any, in use and access of ICTs. It also looked at behavioural changes towards the use of ICT among stakeholders. The expected outcomes identified in each Project stream were adapted for the purpose of administering the Initial Survey and further modified to determine the impact, if any, on key stakeholders. The survey’s targeted population is delineated below: 1. The Principals of sixty-seven (67) secondary schools; 2. Students of two (2) randomly selected classes from each of the sixty-seven (67) secondary schools; 3. Parents of these selected students; and 4. Form 1 teachers in the eight (8) core subjects (English Language, Integrated Science, Mathematics, Physical Education, Social Studies, Spanish, Technology Education, Visual & Performing Arts). Of this target population, data were received from the following for analysis: 1. Fifty-eight (58) Principals; 2. Seven hundred and twenty-nine (729) teachers; 3. Three thousand, two hundred and ninety-six (3,296) students; and 4. Two thousand, two hundred and seventeen (2,217) parents. The data from each of the surveys were analysed to determine the impact, if any, of the eCal Programme on stakeholders within the home and school environments. Moreover the data was examined to ascertain whether there is an increase or decrease in: • Stakeholders’useofandaccesstodigital resources and content, that is, whether there is an increase/decrease in the percentage of teachers, students and parents using and accessing relevant digital content, through use of the laptops; • An increase/decrease in the level of awareness of digital technologies among stakeholders; • Enhancement in the level of ICT skills among teachers in their teaching methods, and students in their learning within the classroom; • Theextentofactivestudentparticipation and students’ performance in the classroom; • Teachers’ ability to infuse or integrate ICT in their classroom teaching; • The level of adherence to policy compliance by teachers, parents and learners with implementation of the eCal Programme within the nation’s schools; and • The level of parental involvement in the children’s education. The findings from the survey indicated the following: 1. That teachers already possess the basic computer literacy skills; and 2. Most teachers still use the whole group and textbook methods of classroom instruction.
  22. 22. Admin Report 2011-2012 20 Based on these findings, the following recommendations were made: 1. Training should be completed in the following areas: 1.1 use of a variety of strategies for infusing/integrating ICT technology into the curriculum; 1.2 for developing subject-related ICT resources; 1.3 for providing teachers with skills related to classroom teaching, and methods of using the computers/ laptops/Internet to infuse or integrate ICT into every subject teaching unit; 1.4 in the use of the Internet to engage individual and small groups of students in order to maximise student participation/ involvement; 1.5 how to teach students to apply strategies for solving problems using the laptops, and how to use appropriate tools for learning, collaborating,andcommunicating using ICT; 1.6 use of Blogs and Wikis so teachers can encourage active participation among students during lesson presentations; 2. Class sizes should be kept at levels that allow teachers to give learners individual and/or small group attention for full and effective learning; 3. There should be greater communication between home and school (relevant to student performance) using e-mail; 4. More emphasis should be placed on using the laptops for remedial learning and tracking of student performance levels; and 5. There should be further expansion of the infrastructure in terms of greater accessibility to Internet within the classroom. (Reference e-Connect and Learn Report Summary July 2011- Ministry of Education, Trinidad and Tobago). The insights obtained from this assessment could be used as guidelines for the overall improvement and enhancement of the programme. 1.4 Summary of the major accomplishments for the laptop initiative in Fiscal 2011- 2012: • Distributed laptops to seventeen thousand and fifty-eight (17,058) Form I students in one hundred and fifty- two (152) secondary schools for the academic year 2012/2013; • Distributed four hundred and sixty- seven (467) laptops to primary school principals; • Trained eight thousand, four hundred (8,400) teachers in ICT related courses; • Collaborated with Microsoft to host the eCal ICT in Education Innovative Award competition to recognise the efforts of teachers in infusing ICT into the curriculum; • Trained thirty-five (35) Curriculum Officers, with the support of the Distance Education Unit, to support the integration of ICTs in curriculum delivery; • Developed ICT integrated instructional packages for Forms 1-3 students in seven (7) subject areas; • Over thirteen thousand (13,000) Form I students registered with NALIS to access e-resources on the NALIS website, as part of the eCal programme; and • Conducted a post evaluation exercise of the eCal programme.
  23. 23. Admin Report 2011-201221 2. Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) 2.1 Construction of Centres The Ministry of Education has been working assiduously to achieve the Prime Minister’s mandate to attain universal Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) by 2015. While it seems to be a herculean undertaking, one of the immediate approaches adopted by the Ministry to create “school space” for students makes it an achievable target. The approach is namely: the traditional construction of ECCE Centres;public/private partnerships with private ECCE providers and the conversion of spaces at underutilized primary schools into ECCE rooms. With respect to the construction of new Centres, over the past two years the Ministry has completed the construction of twenty-nine (29) ECCE Centres. As part of the IDB funded Support for a Seamless Education Project fifty (50) Centres are expected to be constructed by August 2013. With respect to the twenty- four (24) Centres in Phase I, construction has commenced on the nineteen (19) sites identified in Table I below, while staff are working tirelessly to resolve the site related issues for the remaining five sites. It is expected that construction will commence on at least two of these by the end of December 2012. Figure 4: Participants at ECCE Consultation
  24. 24. Admin Report 2011-2012 22 Table 1: Location of Nineteen (19) Early Childhood Care and Education Sites No. ECCE CENTRE EDUCATION DISTRICT 1 Arima New Government ECCE St. George East 2 Arouca Pine Haven S.D.A. St. George East 3 Bamboo ECCE St. George East 4 Maloney Gardens II St. George East 5 Barataria A.C. ECCE St. George West 6 Buen Intento ECCE Victoria 7 Corinth Hill ECCE Victoria 8 Cunupia A.C ECCE Caroni 9 Jacob Hill ECCE St. George East 10 Madras ECCE Caroni 11 Palmiste ECCE Caroni 12 Quarry ECCE St. Patrick 13 Salazar Trace ECCE St. George East 14 Malabar ECCE St. George East 15 Mount Hope ECCE St. George East 16 Southern Gardens St. Patrick 17 La Ruffin ECCE Nariva/Mayaro 18 Brothers ECCE Victoria 19 Pleasantville ECCE Victoria
  25. 25. Admin Report 2011-201223 2.2 Public/Private Partnership Agreements In an effort to meet the demand for places at ECCE Centres, the Ministry is at the exploratory stage of its proposal to partner with private ECCE providers. To this end, a series of public consultations were held during the last fiscal year to gather information from stakeholders. As a consequence of those consultations the Ministry is at the stage of finalising different private/public partnership models. Some of the key considerations in selecting the final model will be the financial cost, the readiness of privateprovidersinmeetingtheECCEstandards of the Ministry regarding curriculum and school buildings and the sustainability of the project. 2.3 Conversion of Spaces at underutilized Primary Schools for Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) TheMinistryiscurrentlyexploringthefeasibility of using the spaces at underutilized primary schools for the purpose of early childhood education. It was envisioned that this approach wouldmaximizetheuseofunderutilizedspaces, cut the cost of construction of new Centres and provide feeder Centres for transition to existing primary schools. An initial physical assessment of approximately forty-five primary schools was undertaken by Educational Facilities Company Limited for the project. As a result of a second assessment done by representatives of the MOE, thirteen (13) government primary schools qualified for consideration since they had available land space. The thirteen (13) government primary schoolsare:ChaguanasNorth,Chatam,Cocoyea, D’Abadie, Beetham Gardens, Enterprise, Egypt Village, Hardbargain, Marabella, Nariva/ Manzanilla, Preysal, Penal Quinam and Rancho Quemado. Disqualification of the remaining thirty-two (32) sites was due to the challenges and constraints that emerged namely: • Additional space is required to facilitate the introduction of the Continuous Assessment Component (CAC) of SEA, therefore those spaces that were earlier identified are no longer available to accommodate ECCE activities • In spite of available land space, the topography of the land in some cases cannot support the construction of centres • The available land space in some instances is too small to accommodate the construction of centres • Continued dialogue is needed with the Denominational Boards to ensure access to land in possession of the Boards. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 • Complete the construction of fifty (50) ECCE Centres under the IDB/ GORTT funded Support for a Seamless Education Project • Commence the roll-out of the plan to convert excess space in under-utilized primary schools for use as ECCE centres • Sign MOUs between the Ministry of Education and private ECCE service providers and commence upgrade of private ECCE centres through public/ private partnership arrangement.
  26. 26. Admin Report 2011-2012 24 3. Improving Infrastructure in Schools 3.1 Primary Schools One of the major challenges facing primary schools is the dilapidated condition of a number of primary school buildings which are well over 100 years old. The Ministry continues to address these challenges primarily through the construction of new schools and upgrades to existing buildings. In the past two (2) years the Ministry of Education completed the construction of twelve (12) primary schools as follows:- 1. St. Barbara’s Spiritual Shouter Baptist Primary School (Figure 5) 2. Tunapuna Government 3. Balmain Presbyterian 4. Charlieville Presbyterian 5. Riversdale Presbyterian 6. Biche Presbyterian 7. Penal Rock Road SDMS, 8. Lengua Government 9. Palo Seco Government 10. Arima New Government (Figure 6) 11. Mt. Pleasant Government 12. Tulsa Trace Hindu Another ten (10) schools are currently under construction:- 1. Enterprise Government 2. Monkey Town Government 3. Fanny Village Government 4. Febeau Government 5. Rosehill R.C. 6. Eccles Village Government 7. New Grant Government 8. Paramin R.C. 9. Belmont Boys’ R.C. 10. Barrackpore A.S.J.A. Further, the Ministry in its 2012-2014 construction programme has scheduled the construction of forty-two (42) replacement primary schools. Notably, construction has already commenced on seven (7) of these primary schools. 3.2 Secondary Schools OverthepasttwoyearstheMinistryofEducation has completed the construction of four (4) secondary schools with work ongoing on eight (8) additional schools. For fiscal 2011/2012, the Ministry formally opened:- 1) Marabella South Secondary, 2) Aranguez North Secondary (Figures 7); 3) Couva West Government Secondary and 4) Five Rivers Secondary. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 • Construction will commence on Shiva Boys’ Hindu and Parvati Girls’ Hindu Colleges Additional blocks will be constructed for:- • Vishnu Boys SDMS Hindu College; • Charlieville ASJA Boys’; • Charlieville ASJA Girls’; and • Sangre Grande SWAHA Hindu College • Complete or advance construction at eight (8) secondary schools currently under construction
  27. 27. Admin Report 2011-201225 Infrastructure in Schools Figure 5: St. Barbara’s Spiritual Shouter Baptist Primary School Figures 7 & 8: Aranguez North Secondary School Figure 6: Arima New Government Primary School
  28. 28. Admin Report 2011-2012 26 3.3 School Repairs Programme TheMinistryhasimplementedacomprehensive school repair programme for the repair and maintenance of all schools. Every effort is made to schedule these repairs during the August school vacation period in order to avoid disruption of classes. Over the last two years the Ministry of Education has repaired approximately three hundred and fifty (350) primary and secondary schools. Seventy- seven (77) primary and secondary schools were repaired during the July-August 2012 vacation period. 4. Curriculum Reform Another major initiative is the reform of the primaryschoolcurriculum.Thisnewcurriculum will serve as the blueprint for the development of the ideal child/citizen we want to produce. A contractual agreement for the reform of the curriculum commenced in June 2012 and will continue to August 2013. The contract was awarded to the Canadian consortium EduNova. Meanwhile, CurriculumWriting will commence in October 2012. Initially seven (7) subject areas were carded for review; however two more subject areas were added, namely, Agricultural Science and Character Education. The hiring of local curriculum writers for the various subject areas is expected to be effected early in the next fiscal year. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 • Procurement of the required equipment for the writing teams and the schools in which curriculum will be tested • Creation of a website for the hosting of curriculum materials • Recruitment of a firm to print the new curriculum guides and materials • Implementation of the new primary school curriculum by September 2013. 5. Enhanced Literacy and Numeracy A solid foundation in literacy and numeracy opens up a whole new world to students to take advantage of the full range of curricula choices in school and beyond. Cognisant of this importance, the Ministry has given its commitment to improve our students reading, mathematics and writing skills. An analysis of student performance in English/Language Arts and Mathematics at the national and regional examinations shows that student performance in these two subjects is below average. In order to improve students’ literacy and numeracy skills a literacy and numeracy plan was developed for implementation in schools. This literacy strategy will monitor those students at risk of falling behind and will provide targeted interventions. Elements of the Plan include: • The conduct of a pilot project in selected schools • Collection and analysis of data • Training of numeracy coaches • Literacyteamstobeformedandteachers to work in their respective schools. 6. Movement of Secondary Entrance Assessment (SEA) from March to May The Ministry placed a priority on the movement of the SEA from March to May with the aim of improving the overall performance of students at the SEA exit examinations. This is premised on the need to provide additional time to the students to help them to be better prepared for the examination. Through successful negotiations with the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) and other stakeholders, all systems were put in place to facilitate the movement of the examination. As a result of these efforts, the SEA was held for the first time on May 10th , 2012.
  29. 29. Admin Report 2011-201227 A total of seventeen thousand, nine hundred and sixteen (17,916) children from public and private primary schools throughout Trinidad and Tobago wrote the SEA.  Eight thousand, nine hundred and ninety four (8,994) boys and eight thousand, nine hundred and twenty- two (8,922) girls were tested on their skills in Mathematics, Language Arts and Creative Writing for placement into a secondary school based on the individual scores achieved. 7. Expansion of the Technical/ Vocational Programme Through the expansion of the Technical/ Vocational Programme in schools, the Ministry of Education expects to see an increase in the number of students pursuing subjects in the Technical/Vocational area. By extension there should be an increase in the number of students requesting certification for the achievement of full Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ) Standards and an increase in the variety of Standards on offer to students at the secondary school level. This is noted in the Ministry of Education’s Strategic Plan 2011 – 2015, which identifies that children at secondary schools should be exposed to a more varied curriculum including the exposure to skills-based subjects. The Caribbean Vocational Qualification is an award that represents achievement of a set of competencies which define the core work practices of an occupational area consistent with the levels articulated within the regional frameworks. The student who achieves a full standard award at Level I is described as a semi- skilledworkerwhoisabletoperformasignificant rangeofvariedworkactivitiesinalimitedvariety of contexts. Since the introduction of the CVQ programme in 2008, there has been a steady increase in the number of schools and students exposed to related skills-based subjects. The MOE has moved beyond and has since made it mandatory that all students will undertake at least one CVQ skill. The implementation of this initiative should ensure that all students acquire a specific occupational skill as part of their general education. TheCVQProgrammehasbeenfacedwithseveral challenges. CVQ by its very nature necessitates a constant in-flow of attention and inputs in order for it to thrive. However, the long term benefits that are to be derived far outweigh any difficulty that may be experienced in the initial stages. There are some minimum factors that are crucial to the success of a program of this nature which have affected the program to date. These factors are: • The acceptability and market value of CVQ Certification; • Stakeholders “buy-in” and acceptance of the programme namely:- parents; TTUTA; school administrators; teachers; students; tertiary level educational institutions; other organizations and the community; • Adequate qualified teachers to impart specialized skills; • Adequate Support Officers most notably Curriculum Officers to assist with the monitoring of the program; • Abilitytoutilizetheattainedcertification for matriculation purposes at tertiary level education institutions; • Certification used as a criterion for employment by government ministries and statutory bodies; • MoE’s support in terms of finance; staffing and other support; • The CVQ programme requires timely and regular funding; • Supportive administrators with a technical/vocational understanding or knowledge; • Upgrading of physical infrastructure to accommodate skill-based subjects;
  30. 30. Admin Report 2011-2012 28 • Health and safety awareness and practices in the whole school; • Updating of pertinent/relevant data on a timely basis on all schools; • Inability to access CVQ results in a timely manner both by students and TVET Unit, CPDD, MoE; • Presentation of CVQ results proves difficult for principals to interpret. In spite of these challenges, the following were achieved:- • In fiscal 2011 to 2012 the MOE developed a partnership with the National Training Agency (NTA) for the training of TVET teachersatsecondaryschoolstobecome Assessors and Heads of Departments as InternalVerifiers. By the end of July 2012, fifty (50) persons had been trained as Internal Verifiers and one hundred and thirty-one (131) teachers as Assessors. 1. Government and Government Assisted schools were each given a grant of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) for CVQ expansion. 2. Five hundred (500) Information Technology and Technical Vocational Teachers were trained. 3. 2011 CXC results indicated that five hundred and twenty-four (524) students received full CVQ awards and nine thousand and four hundred (9,400) received Unit Awards in various subject areas. 4. Sixty-five (65) secondary schools currently offer CVQ subjects; forty-eight (48) government schools; seventeen (17) denominational schools. Sixty nine (69) will be offering CVQ subjects from September 2012. 5. Ofthesixty-five(65),nine(9)government and sixteen (16) government assisted schools are interested in expanding their CVQ Programme. In academic year 2013, the following will be pursued:- 1. Execution of change management strategy regarding stakeholders’ perception of the Technical/Vocational Programme. 2. Recruitment of qualified instructors. 3. Assessment of facilities – Audits of facilities are scheduled for the period September to December 2012 for all secondaryschoolsthatwillbeexpanding their CVQ options. 4. A special committee will be formed to come up with a comprehensive proposal including financial resourcing for CVQ expansion beyond September, 2012. 5. Roll out of a monitoring and evaluation framework for the CVQ programme. In this regard, more Curriculum Officers will be required to monitor the expanded programme. 6. Lay the foundation for the registration of approximately twenty-three (23) additional schools by 2014, thus increasing the number of schools offering CVQs from sixty-nine (69) in 2012 to ninety-one (91) by 2014 7. Increase the number of students enrolled in the CVQ programme from one thousand, five hundred and sixty (1,560) to over three thousand (3,000) 8. Lay the groundwork for an increase in the number of occupational areas from twenty-six (26) to thirty-one (31).
  31. 31. Admin Report 2011-201229 8. Teaching and Teacher Development Teachers are pivotal to a quality education system. They however, need to be motivated, highly qualified and knowledgeable to make a difference in the lives of students. In seeking to ensure that teachers are adequately qualified the MOE embarked on an initiative to revamp the teaching sector. To facilitate this exercise the MOE proposed to establish the Teaching and Teacher Development Division (TTDD) which replaces the former Teacher Education & Teacher Performance Project Unit (TETPPU). The mandate of the TTDD is to produce and advance teachers who are competent and adequately equipped to: 1. efficiently and effectively implement school curriculum; 2. improve student performance; 3. help students to achieve the values outcomes consistent with the national vision for our children A new organizational structure has been designed. Efforts toward the establishment of the Division will be pursued in fiscal 2013. In April 2012, a contract for the conduct of a Baseline Survey of Teacher Performance, Parent and Student Attitudes and Achievements commenced and will conclude in March 2013. This consultancy is expected to facilitate the evaluation of the evaluation of the effectiveness of the intervention strategies that were designed to enhance the quality of teaching. Through this consultancy the MOE will be assisted in the development of profiles for teacher performance, parent and student attitude and student achievement. WithrespecttotheBaselineSurvey,thefollowing activities were completed • Orientation sessions were held for all Principals of the 60 samples schools • TrainingsessionswereheldforPrincipals and Vice Principals in the use of the ipad to conduct the Teacher Monitoring Protocol (TMP) Survey in Trinidad • Survey instruments were distributed to and collected from the 60 sample schools. In keeping with its effort to develop a critical mass of leaders to guide the transformation initiatives, the Ministry held a leadership conference for school principals and administrators. The theme of which was ‘The Leader in Me”. The objective was to enhance the skills of key personnel entrusted with the responsibility of facilitating and supporting the transformation initiative. Figure 9 is a group photograph of the MOE Strategic Executive Team (SET) and conference presenters. Some of the other major activities accomplished in fiscal 2012 are as follows: • Conducted professional development training for thirty-five (35) Curriculum Officers to support teachers in the delivery of the Health and Family Life Education (HFLE) curriculum.
  32. 32. Admin Report 2011-2012 30 Figure 9: Ministry’s Executive Team Conference Presenters • Trained one hundred and fifty (150) SecondarySchoolTechnologyEducation and CVQ teachers through workshops conducted by the Ministry of Energy and Energy Affairs in its Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency programme. • Conducted workshops on Discipline for Principals of Secondary and Primary Schools. • CompleteddiscussionswithTTUTAwith respect to a Performance Management Appraisal Process Manual. 9. Improving Students Overall Academic Performance The main indicators used to measure students’ academic performance are the results of the local and regional examinations administered to students at the primary and secondary levels. During the last academic year students at the primary level from Standards I to IV wrote the National Tests while the students of Standard V wrote the Secondary Entrance Assessment for transition to the secondary level. Students at the secondary level wrote the NCSE, the CSEC and CAPE Examinations and the CVQ.
  33. 33. Admin Report 2011-201231 In general, while improvements in students’ performance in some of the examinations have been achieved, there is still room for further improvementparticularlyinCSECMathematics and English. The performance of students at various levels and in the various examinations are presented hereunder:- 9.1 National Test - Performance of Students in Mathematics and Language Arts In 2012, eighteen thousand five hundred and forty-two (18,542) students in Standard 1 and nineteen thousand nine hundred and forty- eight (19,948) students in Standard 3 wrote the National Test in Mathematics and Language Arts. There has been an overall increase in the percentage of students attaining or exceeding standards(Levels3and4)requiredforstandards 1 and 3 in Mathematics and Language Arts in 2012 when compared to the combined period 2008 to 2012. In Mathematics there was about 40% improvement in Standards 1 and 3, while literacy levels improved by about 50% in Standards 1 and 3. The findings are as follows: Mathematics Standard 1 • In 2012, 68% of the students writing Mathematics in Standard 1 met or exceeded the acceptable standards (levels 3 and 4) compared to 51% in 2011. • In 2012, there was corresponding reduction in students not meeting the acceptable standards. Standard 3 • 65% of students writing Mathematics in Standard 3 met or exceeded the acceptable standards (levels 3 and 4) in 2012 compared to 48% in 2011. • In 2012, there was also a significant reduction in students not meeting the acceptable standards. Language Arts Standard 1 • 55% of students in Standard 1 writing Language Arts met or exceeded the acceptable standards (Levels 3 and 4) in 2012 compared to 38% in 2011. • In 2012, there was also a significant reduction in students not meeting the acceptable standards in Language Arts. Standard 3 • 67% of students in Standard 3 writing Language Arts met or exceeded the acceptable standards (Levels 3 and 4) in 2012 compared to 42% in 2011. • In 2012, there was also a significant reduction in students not meeting the acceptable standard. • In 2012, 68% of the students writing Mathematics in Standard 1 met or exceeded the acceptable standards (levels 3 and 4) compared to 51% in 2011. • In 2012, there was corresponding reduction in students not meeting the acceptable standards. Standard 3 • 65% of students writing Mathematics in Standard 3 met or exceeded the acceptable standards (levels 3 and 4) in 2012 compared to 48% in 2011.
  34. 34. Admin Report 2011-2012 32 9.2 Performance of Primary Schools at the National Tests – Academic Performance Index (API) There has been a significant improvement in performance of schools in 2012 compared to the period 2009 to 2012 as measured by their Academic Performance Index. A school’s score or placement on the API is designed to be an indicator of a school’s performance level and is calculated annually using the percentage of students at each achievement level for Mathematics and Language Arts at Standards 1 and 3. Literacy and numeracy are important areas for overall school effectiveness and future academic achievement. The composite score which varies from 0 to 560 is used to place schools in four categories:- • EXCELLING (401-560) – Extremely high proportions of students meeting or exceeding standards in both classes and areas of learning. • MOSTLY EFFECTIVE (241-400) – Adequatetohighproportionsofstudents meeting or exceeding standards in both classes and areas of learning. • ACADEMIC WATCH (81-240) – Inadequate numbers of students meeting or exceeding standards in one or more classes or areas of learning. Requires immediate attention to specific challenges faced by school. • ACADEMIC EMERGENCY (0–80) Inadequate numbers of students meeting or exceeding in both classes and areas of learning. Requires urgent and immediate intervention. There has been an improvement in the schools based on the academic performance index during the period 2009 – 2012. In 2012, there was a significant increase in the number of schools that were placed under the Excelling band of the API Category. Correspondingly, there has been a decline in the number of schools not meeting the required standard and categorized as being under academic watch over the period 2011 – 2012:- A summary of this information is provided below • The number of schools placed under Academic Watch decreased from one hundred and twenty (120) in 2011 to twenty-eight (28) in 2012. • There was an increase in the number of schools in the excelling band from fifteen (15) in 2011 to one hundred and twenty-one (121) in 2012. • No schools fell into the Academic Emergency category. • The results therefore showed a significant improvement in the performance of primary schools in 2012 with a large shift in the number of schools under Academic watch moving into the Most Effective category and schools in the mostly effective category moving into the excelling band.
  35. 35. Admin Report 2011-201233 API Category 2011 2012 No. of Schools % No of Schools % Academic Watch 120 22.3 28 5.2 Mostly Effective 394 73.2 384 71.4 Excelling 15 2.8 121 22.5 Total 529 98.3 533 99.1 • Schools excelling improved by 800% from 2011 to 2012. • Reduction of schools under academic watch by about 80%. 9.3 Secondary Entrance Assessment (SEA) The Secondary Entrance Assessment was administered for the first time on the 10th May, 2012. This was done to provide students and teachers with additional time to prepare for the examination and ultimately result in the overall improvement of students’ performance. A total of seventeen thousand eight hundred and sixty- three (17,863) students (9,967 boys and 8,896 girls) wrote the examinations. Table 2 highlights the number of students who wrote the examination and were placed at secondary schools over the period 2008-2012. The trends over the five year period indicate that the number of students writing the SEA averaged over seventeen thousand (17,000) and approximately 94% of the students were placed at the five and seven-year government and government assisted secondary schools. From 2008 to 2012 there was a small increase in the percentage of students placed at secondary schools. The table also shows that there has been a steady decline in the number of students placed at Pre-Vocational Centres. Table 2: Number and Percentage of Students Placed in Secondary Schools by School Type: SEA 2008 – 2012 Year Total Entered Number / Percentage Number Placed by Type of School Total Placed 7 & 5-Year Private Pre-Voc. Government Schools Centres 2008 17855 No. 16035 580 409 17024 % 94.2 3.4 2.4  95.3 2009 17615 No. 16100 367 497 16964 % 94.9 2.2 2.9 96.3  2010 17268 No. 15962 506 399 16867 % 94.6 3.0 2.4  97.7 2011 17280 No. 16042 483 347 16872 % 95.1 2.9 2.0 97.6 2012 17863 No. 16684 476 332 17492 % 95.3 2.7 1.9 97.9 Source: Division of Educational Research and Evaluation
  36. 36. Admin Report 2011-2012 34 Table 3 provides information on the number of students who re-wrote the SEA over a five year period 2008-2012. It is observed that there has been a steady decline in the number of students re-writing the SEA. In 2008, there were eight hundred and thirty-one (831) (4.7%) repeaters while by 2012 the figures had dropped significantly to three hundred and seventy- one (371) (2.1%). Over the five year period the Ministry sought to make several interventions to support students and help them to improve their performance. Among these efforts were the Performance Enhancement Programme and the CETT. The outcomes of these measures are becoming increasingly evident with the declining number of students re-writing the SEA. 9.4 Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate Examination [CSEC] 2012 National Performance at a Glance re: CSEC • A total of 30,791 candidates were registered for 35 subjects at the 2012 Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate Examination (CSEC) as compared to 33,318 in 2011 and 33,254 in 2010 (Figure 10). • 23,942 candidates actually wrote the examination of which 41.2% (9, 866) were males and 58.8% (14, 076) were females (Figure 11). • Of the total 110, 795 subject entries, 59.5% (65, 936) obtained Grades 1-III. Of this amount 13.8% (15, 239) obtained Grade 1, 20.3% (22, 475) obtained Grade II and 25.5% (28, 221) obtained Grade III (Figure 12). • When the results are disaggregated by gender, 56.0% of the male students and 62.2% of the females who wrote the examination achieved Grades I-III. • 42.8% of the students were successful in five or more subjects while the percentage of students who obtained five or more subjects with English A and Mathematics was 42.3%. In 31 of the 35 subjects written, 50% or more of the students obtained a passing grade - Grades I-III - with 9 of the subjects reflecting a pass rate of 75% or more. Physical Education and Sport recorded the highest pass rate approximately 92.4%. • Agricultural Science (Double Award), Mathematics, Visual Arts and Human and Social Biology (HSB) fell below the 50% benchmark with Agricultural Science being the lowest. In Agricultural Science approximately 16.0% obtained Grades I-III, in Visual Arts 40.7%, Mathematics 41%, and HSB 46.4% Table 3: Number and Percentage of Students Invited to Repeat SEA: 2008 - 2012 Year No. Wrote No. Placed No. & % of Repeaters 2008 17855 17024 831 (4.7%) 2009 17615 16964 651 (3.7%) 2010 17268 16867 401 (2.3%) 2011 17280 16872 408 (2.4%) 2012 17863 17492 371 (2.1%) Source: Division of Educational Research and Evaluation
  37. 37. Admin Report 2011-201235 A summary of the performance of students who wrote five or more subjects and attained five or more subjects including English A and Mathematics at the CSEC 2012 is presented in Table 4. Of the eight (8) educational districts, just two districts (Port-of Spain and Victoria) showed that 50% of the students gained 5 or more subjects including English A and Mathematics. In three educational districts, fewer than 30% of the students gained 5 or more subjects including Maths and English A. Overall the national average was 42.2%. These results provide critical data that will inform strategies to be developed and implemented to improve students’ performance in these two subject areas. Figure 10: The percentages of Students who registered for CSEC over the period 2010-2012 Figure 11: The total number of Boys and Girls who wrote CSEC in 2012
  38. 38. Admin Report 2011-2012 36 Figure 12: CSEC 2012: Grades I – III Awarded by Subject Entries Table 4 CSEC 2012: Number of students attaining five (5) or more subjects including Mathematics and English A at government and government assisted secondary schools Educational District Attempted 5 or more with English A and Mathematics Attained 5 or more with English A and Mathematics % attained 5 or more with English A and Mathematics Caroni 1625 659 40.6 North Eastern 527 127 24.1 Port-of-Spain 2129 1105 51.9 Victoria 1613 844 52.3 South Eastern 1190 354 29.7 St George East 2648 1198 45.2 St Patrick 1150 401 34.9 Tobago 574 160 27.9 National 11,456 4,848 42.3 Source: Division of Educational Research and Evaluation
  39. 39. Admin Report 2011-201237 9.5 Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) Students continued to excel at the CAPE. The performance of students at this examination has been consistently high over the period 2008-2012. The results presented in Table 5 shows that over 90% of the students gained passing grades in Unit I and Unit II over the five year period, except for the year 2010, when 88% gained passing grades in Units I and II. Table 5: CAPE Unit I & Unit II – 2008 – 2012 (Grades I – IV) Year Subject Entries Unit I Subject Entries Unit II No. % Passed No. % Passed 2008 22,084 93.5 1,455 93.0 2009 23,415 91.8 1,564 90.6 2010 26,180 88.0 12,073 88.0 2011 26,294 92.8 12,350 93.3 2012 22,378 94.0 10,617 93.2 9.6 Award of National Scholarships based on CAPE Results In2012,theGovernmentawardedthreehundred and seventy-two (372) National Scholarships comprising seventy (70) open and three hundred and two (302) additional scholarships based on the CAPE 2012. The Government increased the number of national scholarships from three hundred and twenty-nine (329) in 2010 and three hundred and fifty-four (354) in 2011 to three hundred and seventy-two (372) in 2012, based on the rise in the number of students qualifying for such. The estimated annual cost for the award of all three hundred and seventy-two (372) national scholarships is fifty three million, seven hundred and two thousand dollars ($53,702,000.00). Scholarships were awarded in ten (10) subject groups which included Business, Environmental Science, Languages, Mathematics, Modern Studies/ Humanities, Natural Sciences, Technical Studies, Technological Studies, General Studies and Visual and Performing Arts. Additionally, two President’s Medals were awarded to the highest performing students in the examinations. These students were Marcus Isaac Belasco of Naparima College, San Fernando, who was the top performing student in Mathematics, Natural Sciences and Environmental Studies, and Brad Bachu of Presentation College, Chaguanas who was the top performer in Business, Languages, Modern Studies, Technical Studies, Technological Studies,Visual and Performing Arts and General Studies. Source: Division of Educational Research and Evaluation
  40. 40. Admin Report 2011-2012 38 10. Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children Consistent with its vision for the healthy, happy and normal development of children, the Ministry has prioritized the delivery of specialized services to prepare children for learning and education development so as to treat with the neurological and educational development of students. With this purpose in mind, the Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children project was initiated. The objectives of the Testing and Neuro- Diagnostics of Children project are to: • Conduct a pilot exercise with eight (8) ECCE Centres and eight (8) Primary schools which will comprise screening, assessmentandinterventionofchildren. Table 6 shows the schools selected for the pilot exercise. • Provide appropriate education programmes and interventions for children assessed with learning needs, to help them to achieve their diverse levels of development. • Develop a plan for the continued universal screening, testing and intervention planning for the treatment of children. • Design and develop a programme to address the main factors affecting the child and his/her development, Figure 13: Ministry of Education Officials, CXC Officials and Students at Awards Ceremony
  41. 41. Admin Report 2011-201239 including school, parents/guardians/ caregivers, teachers/ principals and classroom interactions. Some of the benefits to be derived from this project include: • Comprehensive provision of specialized services to students catering to specific diagnosed conditions • Establishment of a specialized services delivery system to cater to students’ needs • Individualized plans developed for children diagnosed with difficulties, mental challenges, developmental disorders etc. To date technical assistance was procured through the award of a contract for the development and implementation of appropriate strategies, plans and structures for children understanding, to address the needs of all children, and for the design and delivery of suitable children services. The next steps for the project include the preparation of a project charter and work plan by the consultant, launching of the project at national and educational district levels in January 2013 and site visits to the selected pilot schools by consultants and project team members. Table 6. Pilot Schools re;Testing and Neuro-Diagnostics of Children Project DISTRICT PRIMARY SCHOOL ECCE CENTRE St George East El Socorro South Government El Socorro South ECCE Centre Port of Spain La Puerta Government La Puerta ECCE Centre North Eastern Sangre Grande Government Sangre Grande ECCE Centre Caroni Carapichaima Roman Catholic St Sylvan Anglican ECCE Centre Victoria La Romaine Government La Romaine ECCE Centre St Patrick Santa Flora Government Santa Flora ECCE Centre South Eastern St. Mary’s Government St. Mary’s ECCE Tobago Buccoo Government Buccoo ECCE Centre
  42. 42. Admin Report 2011-2012 40 11. Continuous Assessment The Continuous Assessment Component (CAC) of the Secondary Entrance Assessment is part of a series of transformational initiatives of the Ministry of Education intended to realize the five Value Outcomes of education for our children. In order to equip students with 21st century skills, it is necessary to change teaching and learning strategies and assessment methods. The CAC seeks to address the diverse backgrounds, aptitudes and learning styles of our students to ensure that they are given every opportunity to succeed. The CAC programme consists of specified curriculum objectives for achieving skills and competencies not previously subject to assessment on a national scale. These competencies and skills will be gained by students as they participate in active hands- on learning supported by detailed feedback provided through their teachers from practice assessments. Assessment tasks will see students engagedinspecificactivitiesandtheapplication of standard scoring guides. The assessments will be monitored and moderated by Ministry officials to ensure adherence to national standards. The CAC will be implemented in Standard 5 for the first time in the academic year 2012-2013. Students writing the SEA in 2013 will write the traditional Mathematics and the English Language Arts papers only. Both subjects combined will contribute a value of 80% of the students’ total mark. Students will have the opportunity to accumulate the other 20% over the entire year from the CAC in CreativeWriting. The Ministry officials envisage that students will be afforded a greater chance to develop their writing in a relaxed manner and will no longer be marked on just one piece of writing. During the last academic year, the activities completed to ensure that the implementation of the CAC is on schedule include inter alia:- • The training of primary school teachers in a process approach to writing and scoring to ensure objectivity in marking of students’ writing • All teachers were trained to use the same marking scheme supplied by the MOE • CXC trained thirty-four (34) Curriculum Officers, forty-one (41) School Supervisors and a group of one hundred and twenty-one (121) persons as CAC monitors • Additional administrative support was provided to school principals with the placement of over one thousand (1,000) On-the-Job trainees • The implementation of a sensitization programme for Principals and other stakeholders through the conduct of conferences, fraternity meetings, cluster group meetings, face to face interviews and telephone calls. Also printed presentations with background information and implementation plans, Administrators’ booklets, memoranda and Question and Answer booklets were developed for school principals. • Writing note books (portfolios) were provided to students at no additional cost to parents. • Teachers were provided with copies of a text which utilizes Caribbean based themes and methodologies to support the teaching of writing. 12. Career Guidance and Development in Secondary Schools The Ministry is proposing to provide the required guidance and instruction to students that will assist in their career development and transition into the world of work. For the academic year 2011/2012, sixty percent (60%) of secondary schools have participated in the
  43. 43. Admin Report 2011-201241 Career Guidance Programme of the Ministry. In January 2013, the Ministry in collaboration with the Ministry of Tertiary Education and Skills Training will be hosting a series of Career Fairs across the education districts including Tobago. This will give students the opportunity to receive information on career choices as well as visit the jobs and career coaches that will be available at the various locations. 13. Social Programmes 13.1 Textbook Loan Programme The Textbook Loan Programme is administered by the Ministry’s Textbook Management Unit. This is just one of the programmes that seek to create equity of opportunity in education. The provision of textbooks and other learning materials to students at all levels of the system ensures that students are equipped for the teaching-learning situation. The Education Facilities Company Limited (EFCL) was responsible for the procurement and distribution of all textbooks and learning materials to ECCE, primary and secondary schools. In an effort to reduce wastage and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the programme, the Ministry undertook an inventory audit in May 2012. The audit was aimed at collecting data on all excess textbooks or unused textbooks in the primary and secondary school system with a view to re-distribute the books to schools in need. However some of the challenges encountered were the poor response from schools as well as the lack of resources to both collect and re- distribute the books. For fiscal 2011/2012 the following were provided: 13.1.1 Infants I and Infants II Textbooksinfive(5)subjectareas-Mathematics, Language Arts, Reading, Science and Social Studies, as well as workbooks, in the three (3) subject areas of Language Arts, Science and Reading. 13.1.2 Standard 1 to Standard 5 Textbooksinfive(5)subjectareas-Mathematics, Language Arts, Reading, Science, and Social Studies, and one (1) dictionary for students of Standard 1 and one (1) Atlas for students of Standard 3. 13.1.3 Forms 1, 2 and 3 Each student was provided with one (1) textbook for each of the seven (7) core areas of the curriculum namely Mathematics, English, Spanish, Social Studies, Integrated Science, Physical Education, and Visual and Performing Arts (VAPA). In addition, all students entering Form 1, were provided with an Atlas, a Spanish dictionary and an English dictionary to be retained by the students up to examination level. 13.1.4 Forms 4 and 6 One (1) textbook in each of the subject areas, pursued by the student. The textbooks to be used in schools were selected by the Principals, in conjunction with the subject teachers. 13.2 Student Support Services In December 2011 the Ministry of Education disclosed its intention to build five (5) schools, one of which will be built in Tobago, to cater for students with special needs. These schools will incorporate all aspects of the primary school curriculum: sports, information technology, visual and performing arts and traditional academics,andutilizingstateoftheartfacilities. The children attending these schools will benefit from qualified, specialized teachers, counsellors and guides that will cater to their every learning need, be it visual, hearing, or speech impediments, autism, down syndrome, physical disabilities and/or learning disorders. Additionally, children and their parents or guardians will be provided with the material
  44. 44. Admin Report 2011-2012 42 support to cover the costs of their special education need. For example, they will benefit from appropriate transportation to and from school free of charge. In 2012, the Ministry provided guidance and support to students, parents and schools as they prepared for the annual examinations. To this end the following were provided:- 1) Provision of examination materials (past papers and study guides) 2) Monitoring and support towards the completion of school based assessment (SBAs) by students 3) Provision of guidelines and strategies for assisting students re: preparation for examinations, and tools for coping with examination stress and anxieties. 13.3 School Nutrition Programme The School Nutrition Programme currently provides approximately one hundred and fifty-seven thousand, three hundred and sixty- one (157,361) breakfast and lunch meals to students throughout the education system.This represents an overall increase of two thousand, three hundred and sixty-one (2,361) meals each day over the previous financial year. The following Table 7 reflects the breakdown of the beneficiaries of school meals by education levels as at May 31, 2012. Table 7: Distribution of meals by level and cost as at May 31st , 2012 Education Level Breakfast per day Lunch per day Breakfast and Lunch per day Cost per day Pre- school 456 7,551 8,007 $68,273.78 Primary 43,394 66,965 110,359 $927,048.06 Secondary 13,047 20,998 34,045 $286,828.06 Special School 611 897 1,508 $11,952.53 Technical/Vocational 1,497 1,945 3,442 $28,558.81 Total 59,005 98,356 157,361 $1,322,661.23 Total expenditure for the period October 2011 to May 2012 was $196,513,559 compared to $170,835,465 spent over the same period in Fiscal 2011. In an effort to improve the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the Programme, the National Schools Dietary Services Limited (NSDSL) has prioritized the following actions that need to be implemented in fiscal year 2013. These are as follows: • Definition and prioritization of the NSDSL • Achieving model School Nutrition Programme status • Conduct of Research • Commence negotiation of new meal prices (payment to caterers)
  45. 45. CHAPTER TWO Goal 2 Transforming the Ministry into a High Performing Organization
  46. 46. Admin Report 2011-2012 44 Transforming the Ministry into a High Performing Organization P rogress in education depends on effective governance and adequate national policies. Mindful of this, three (3) organizational priorities have been developed for the transformationoftheMinistryintoahighperformingorganization. These are: • Organizational Restructuring and Institutional Strengthening which incorporates development of Information Communication Technology • Corporate Communication Strategy • Human Resource Management and Strengthening
  47. 47. Admin Report 2011-201245 Upon completion of the restructuring exercise, the requisite approvals will be sought so that implementation may commence. PROJECTIONS FOR 2013 • Conduct of an organizational review of the HR Management Division which will facilitate a coordinated alignment of structure with roles, as well as, for the assessment of the current HRM processes, inclusive of its IHRIS • Review of current and proposed management structure of the MOE and making of relevant recommendations • Identification of the resources required, including technological, that will ensure optimum performance of the business processes. 2.1.1 Information and Communication Technology • In addition to initiatives implemented at theschoollevel,theMinistryisworkingto provide at the central level a Centralised WAN OptimisedWireless System that will facilitate seamless roaming by Students, Teachers, Administrative Staff and other Stakeholders throughout all MOE locations/sites. Computerisation of the education district offices is ongoing. The South Eastern District office is currently being upgraded, while the installation and commissioning of Local Area Networks at six (6) Educational District Offices have been completed. A total of $3M has been expended to improve the ICT infrastructure at the Education District Offices. In 2013, the Ministry plans to:- 1. Provide at least a 10Mb Network connection to each MOE Site which will facilitate the Sharing of Services amongst all Stakeholders 2.1 Organizational Restructuring and Institutional Strengthening The thrust of these transformation initiatives is towards improving internal practices, processes and service delivery. Work continued apace in 2012 to re-engineer the operations of the Ministry in order to improve the quality and timeliness of services being delivered. To this end,thecapacityoftheProgrammeandProjects Planning and Management Unit (PPPMU) was further expanded in 2011/2012. This Unit serves as the main point of management for all programmes and projects of the MOE. The major benefits from this approach include harmonisation of efforts, common use of projects and change management methodologies, development and use of core and support business processes. Additionally, this approach will allow the Ministry to focus on its core responsibilities and efficient and effective delivery of goals (value outcomes), which leads towards ensuring value for money spent on the education system. Central to the success of the Ministry’s transformation is the creation of a suitable organisational structure. In this regard, efforts were pursued to develop the new top organisational structure which has been approved by the Senior Executive Team. All efforts were made to ensure that the structure was reflective of and would be responsive to the Ministry’s transformation initiatives and strategic objectives. To this end, the person who was identified to lead the respective functional area, worked with a Team consisting of persons drawn from relevant areas, supported by persons providing organisational structuring or human resource management expertise, as required. The development of the organisational structures for the following Divisions was significantly advanced in 2012:- • School Supervision and Management • Corporate Planning • Teaching and Teacher Development • Educational Services Delivery
  48. 48. Admin Report 2011-2012 46 2. Provide fence-fence wireless coverage to all stakeholders within MOE Sites. 3. Provide at least a 1Gb of Filtered Internet that will be prioritised and Shared amongst all Sites 4. Upgrade the hardware infrastructure at each site. 5. Procure computers and peripheral equipment for the outfitting of the Ministry’s offices in the new buildings and the district offices for Caroni, Port- of-Spain and Environs, North Eastern and St. Patrick 6. Procure computers and peripheral equipment for one hundred and thirty nine (139) schools under the Computerization of Primary Schools Programme 7. Provide educational software for four hundred and seventy-six (476) primary schools 8. Expand the primary school network infrastructure to accommodate wireless network access at three hundred and forty (340) primary school 9. Provide support for the laptop initiative through the provision of wireless and network interface cards, cabling, connectors, servers and hub 10. Provide hardware and software to support a web-based School Based Management System (SBMS) that will capture data on students, teachers and schools to inform policy-making 2.2 Human Resource Management and Strengthening The services of a consultant are being procured to provide technical assistance for the conduct of a consultancy aimed at the transformation of the Human Resource Management Division of the Ministry, including full utilization of the IntegratedHumanResourceInformationSystem (IHRIS). A revised TOR for this consultancy was developed and a request for Proposal was sent to the nine (9) qualified bidders on July 25th , 2012 by the Central Tenders Board. The closing date for RFP was August 23rd , 2012. Proposals have been evaluated. The selected Consultant is expected to be contracted and to begin work shortly. 2.2.1 Staffing The Ministry of Education collaborated with the Teaching Service Commission in the filling of vacancies in promotional positions as follows:-
  49. 49. Admin Report 2011-201247 Teaching Service Promotions received from Teaching Service Commission for 2012 are as follows:- Primary Schools POSITIONS TOTAL Principal (Primary) 82 Vice Principal (Primary) 15 Heads of Department (Primary) 63 Senior Teacher (Primary) 3 Dean (Primary) 60 Senior Teacher (Primary) 100 Senior Special Teacher (Primary) 3 Assistant Teacher (Primary) 130 Secondary Schools POSITIONS TOTAL Principal (Secondary) 25 Vice Principal (Secondary) 24 Head of Department (Secondary) 6 Dean (Secondary) 60 DuringthelastyeartheMinistryofEducationreceivednoticefromtheTeachingServiceCommission of the permanent appointments of one hundred and forty-five (145) teachers (Technical/Vocational Teacher I/II/III/IV – Teacher II/III) .
  50. 50. Admin Report 2011-2012 48 DELINKED STAFF NEW APPOINTMENT PROMOTION ACTING APPOINTMENT Chief Education Officer 1 Director, Educational Research and Evaluation 1 Assistant Director, Education and Evaluation 1 Curriculum Officer 29 Schools Supervisor III 2 Schools Supervisor I 4 Guidance Officer 2 Education Testing Officer 1 In the last year the Ministry of Education recommended to the Teaching Service Commission two hundred and thirty (230) new recruits for the positions of (Technical/Vocational Teacher I/II/III/ IV – Teacher II/III) .
  51. 51. Admin Report 2011-201249 Civil Service Promotions in the Civil Service In the last year, there were ninety-one (91) promotions in various categories of staff, one hundred and thirty-two (132) permanent appointments in various categories of staff, while there were one hundred and twenty-four (124) new recruitments in various categories. 11.3 Corporate Communication Strategy The Ministry’s Communication strategy is crucial to getting the message out to our stakeholders regarding our efforts to transform the education system. The feedback from stakeholders is highly respected since it helps us to improve our performance. The Ministry is working towards strengthening its communications arm as it seeks to improve its brand and levels of effectiveness. Plans are in train to hire a Director to head the Communications Unit. That person will be responsible for the development of a comprehensive communication strategy, among other things. The hiring process commenced in January 2013. 2.4 Internal Stakeholders The strength of any organization depends on its human resources. The Ministry recognizes the importance of its staff and their input towards the attainment of its organizational goals and priorities. During the last year the Ministry continued to recognize and show its appreciation for members of staff for their invaluablecontributions.Onesuchappreciation was held for retirees of the Ministry at a gala function held in November 2011. Sea Award CeremonyWorld Teachers Day Visit to North Eastern School
  52. 52. Admin Report 2011-2012 50 Figure 14: Celebrations at the Ministry of Education Some of the other celebratory events that were held in the last year included a Christmas function in December 2011 and a function for secretarial staff in April 2012. These lighter occassions were embraced by staff to mix and mingle and to get to know each other better. Figure 14 captures some of these moments
  53. 53. CHAPTER THREE Goal 3 Engage Stakeholders in the Change and Transformation Process
  54. 54. Admin Report 2011-2012 52 Engage Stakeholders in the Change and Transformation Process S uccessful delivery in education relies on many people and organisations across the community working together for the benefit of schools. The Ministry and its many stakeholders and benefactors continue to work progressively to improvethequalityofeducation. AstheMinistryseekstoadvance its reform initiatives, the need to engage stakeholders cannot be overstated. More so, since, several of these initiatives require input from stakeholders and quite often constant dialogue and exchange of information. In collaboration with our stakeholders we were able to achieve the following in 2011/2012. Principals’ Consultation
  55. 55. Admin Report 2011-201253 3.1 Engaging Stakeholders In June 2012, the Ministry of Education along with other Ministries and agencies participated in a Public Service Career Fair. Information on training opportunities and employment were provided to job seekers. The Job Fair allowed citizens over a period of four days in North and South Trinidad and Tobago to interact with government service providers, and learn more about what different public sector organisations are doing to make services more accessible in a timely and cost-effective manner.  The Ministry held a number of meetings with one of its key stakeholders – TTUTA, to inform and garner their support for several initiatives including the introduction of the Continuous Assessment Component (CAC) of the Secondary Entrance Assessment. Meetings were also held with the National Parent Teacher Association (NPTA), to discuss further strengthening of their relationship with the Ministry. The Minister of Education reiterated his commitment to engage and recognise the role of parents in the support and development of children as fundamental elements of our education system. The NPTA was informed of the Ministry’s plans to set standards, specifications and requirements that are applicable to the recruitment of persons for teaching positions by the Teaching Service Commission (TSC). The NPTA executive was commended for their initiative in dealing with problems like tardiness by students and in their overall approach to problem solving. NPTA and the Ministry of Education also agreed to work together to improve the quality of the meals being offered to students in all school cafeterias as well as, those distributed by the National
  56. 56. Admin Report 2011-2012 54 guardians of children who are being home schooled were invited to training sessions that were held from July 23rd to August 25th , 2012. School Dietary Services Ltd. Both parties reiterated their commitment to join forces to achieve the holistic development of our children, as the NPTA offered its support re: the Ministry’s Continuous Assessment Component (CAC). The MOE hosted a Principals’ Leadership Conference themed ‘The Leader in Me’. The conference was held at the Centre of Excellence, Macoya on March 27, 2012 and was well attended by a cross section of principals from primary and secondary schools. The objective was to create leadership personalities who are equipped to support and implement the reform initiatives for early childhood care and education, primary and secondary schools. The MOE continued its programme of training of educators for the Continuous Assessment Component of the SEA. Teachers of standard IV and V; school administrators and parent/ World Teachers Day Ministries collaborates for a holistic education 3.2 Community Participation
  57. 57. Admin Report 2011-201255 The Ministry recognises the importance of engagingthecommunityinthedeliveryofquality education. The Ministry has enjoyed a long standing partnership with the local churches in the operation of primary and secondary schools in the country. This relationship was formalised with the enactment of the Concordat of 1960, which outlined the shared responsibilities of both parties in the development of education. A total of 339 primary schools and 41 secondary schools are owned and operated by various denominational boards of management, with financial support provided by the Ministry. This partnership with the community continues to be nurtured with the process of installing Local School Boards (LSBs) in all government schools. These Local School Boards comprise members of the school’s administration, the PTA, student representatives, teacher representatives and community members. At present, there are thirty-four (34 or 25%) government primary schools and one hundred and thirty-four (134 or 100%) government secondary schools with operating Local School Boards. In addition, the Ministry has created a close partnership with the National Parent - Teachers’ Association as a vehicle for addressing the issues facing parents in the education and development of our children. Special Olympics
  58. 58. Admin Report 2011-2012 56 Implementation of a Mentorship Programme in Primary and Secondary Schools The MOE has partnered with the Ministry of National Security to implement the National Mentorship Programme (NMP). The National Mentorship Programme is geared toward positive youth development, and is aimed at young people between the ages of 9 to 25 years, from primary to tertiary level, as well as youth in general who may not have had the opportunity to be exposed to a stable mentor. Participants will be paired with role models who will teach them fundamental life skills, civic responsibility and positive ways of relating to their peers. Among the many positives, a long-term benefit of the project is expected to be a reduction in youth offences. At present, there are 190 mentees (150 males and 40 females) with mentors registered in the programme and 104 mentees awaiting mentors. 114 mentors have completed the training programme with 53 mentors matched and 32 mentors tentatively matched to mentees. 3.3 Consultation with ECCE Providers In June 2012 a series of consultations was held withtheaimofengagingprivateEarlyChildhood Care and Education (ECCE) providers to partner with the Ministry to achieve Universal Education (ECCE). The consultations were scheduled as follows:- • Group 1 - ECCE Centres in the following Education districts: Port of Spain, St. George East and North Eastern • Group 2 - ECCE Centres in the following Education Districts: Caroni, South Eastern, Victoria and St. Patrick • An ECCE consultation is also being planned for Tobago. Participants were presented with four options. Each option outlined the obligations of both the MoE and the prospective service providers. This process will streamline ECCE sector, as thr Ministry strives to be the first nation to achieve universal Early Childhood Care and Education by 2015.
  59. 59. CHAPTER FOUR Financial Review
  60. 60. Admin Report 2011-2012 58 Financial Review T he Ministry of Education has an enormous responsibility to ensure that it is transparent with the accounting of its budgetary allocation. In the last fiscal year the Ministry was allocated the sum of four billion, one hundred and forty- three million, eight hundred and sixty-nine thousand and three hundred and thirty-eight dollars ($4,143,869,338) to facilitate both Development (Capital) and Recurrent (operational) expenditure. Thisallocationrepresented6.99%ofthetotalnationalexpenditureof $59,215,465,885 (total recurrent and total development programme expenditure of Trinidad and Tobago) and also a small increase of 1.66% over the total expenditure of $4,076,069,389 provided for fiscal 2010/2011. YEAR TOTAL RECURRENT EXPENDITURE $ TOTAL DEVELOPMENT (CAPITAL) EXPENDITURE $ TOTAL EXPENDITURE $ 2008 3,337,499,200 840,224,308 4,177,723,508 2009 3,211,995,835 1,066,286,466 4,278,282,301 2010 3,295,548,639 484,583,914 3,780,132,553 2011 3,475,411,204 600,656,185 4,076,067,389 2012 3,603,847,938 540,021,400 4,143,869,338 Table 8 – Ministry of Education’s Financial Allocation (2008 – 2012) Table 8 shows Recurrent Expenditure, Capital Expenditure and Total Expenditure to the Ministry of Education over a five (5) year period 2008 to 2012. Over the five years, recurrent expenditure has increased from year to year except for 2008 to 2009 where there was a small reduction in the recurrent allocation. The Capital Development Programme expenditure fluctuates each year that is, it reflects increases and decreases from year to year.
  61. 61. Admin Report 2011-201259 The general trend of the total expenditure shows increases from year to year except in 2010 where there was a small decrease in total allocation to the Ministry of Education. For the year under review (2011 – 2012) there was an increase in the recurrent expenditure, however there was a decrease in capital expenditure. 4.1 Recurrent Expenditure Government’s recurrent expenditure reflects money spent on the day to day operations of the Ministry. Recurrent expenditure consists mainly of: • Personnel expenditure- wages; salaries; allowances; settlement of arrears; overtime; government’s contribution to national Insurance, group health insuranceandgrouppensionforGeneral Administration, Primary Education and Secondary Education • Goods and services- travelling and subsistence; overseas travel facilities; utilityexpenses;repairsandmaintenance to vehicles, equipment and buildings; office materials and supplies; training; janitorial and maintenance services etc. for General Administration; Primary and Secondary Education; District Services Division; Early Childhood and Care and Education Unit and Rudranath Capildeo Learning Resource Centre • Minor equipment purchases- vehicles; office equipment; furniture and furnishings other minor equipment purchases for General Administration; Primary Education; District Services Division; Early Childhood and Care and Education Unit and Rudranath Capildeo Learning Resource Centre • Current transfers and subsidies- transfers and subsidies to Regional Bodies; United Nations Organisations; International Bodies; Educational Institutions; Households; State Enterprises • Current transfers to statutory boards andsimilarbodies-transferstoStatutory boards; Trinidad and Tobago National Commission for UNESCO; National Library and Information System For fiscal 2011/2012, the recurrent expenditure of three billion, six hundred and three million, eight hundred and forty seven thousand and nine hundred and thirty eight dollars ($3,603,847,938) represented 86.97% of the Ministry’s total allocation of four billion, one hundred and forty three million, eight hundred and sixty nine thousand and three hundred and thirty eight dollars ($4,143,869,338).
  62. 62. Admin Report 2011-2012 60 DESCRIPTION 2011 ACTUAL EXPENDITURE $ 2012 REVISED ESTIMATES $ NET INCREASE/ (DECREASE) $ Personnel Expenditure 2,058,837,078 2,056,023,000 (2,814,078) Goods and Services 704,085,691 773,862,100 69,776,409 Minor Equipment Purchases 71,569,163 101,193,200 29,624,037 Current Transfers and Subsidies 638,568,270 659,896,568 30,828,298 Current Transfers to Statutory Boards and Similar Bodies 2,351,002 3,373,070 1,022,068 TOTAL 3,475,411,204 3,603,847,938 128,436,734 Table 9- Summary of Recurrent Expenditure for the Ministry of Education (2011 – 2012) Table 9 illustrates a decrease in personnel expenditure of two million, eight hundred and fourteen thousand and seventy eight dollars ($2,814,078) while expenditure on goods and services; minor equipment purchases; current transfers and subsidies and current transfers to statutory boards and similar bodies increased over the fiscal years 2011 and 2012. The largest increase of sixty nine million, seven hundred and seventy six thousand, four hundred and nine dollars ($69,776,409) was as a result of higher expenditure for goods and services goods and services due to more money being spent on goods and services within the Ministry of Education. Recurrent expenditure for fiscal 2011/2012 represents an increase of one hundred and twenty eight million, four hundred and thirty six thousand, and seven hundred and thirty four dollars ($128,436,734) from the allocation for fiscal 2010/2011 as illustrated in Table 9 above.
  63. 63. Admin Report 2011-201261 SUB-HEAD/ITEM/SUB-ITEM DESCRIPTION 2012 REVISED ESTIMATES $ 01 PERSONNEL EXPENDITURE 001 General Administration 01 Salaries and Cost of Living Allowance 05 Secondary Education 01 Salaries and Cost of Living Allowance 006 Primary Education 01 Salaries and Cost of Living Allowance 154,000,000 907,000,000 860,000,00 02 GOODS AND SERVICES 001 General Administration 16 Contract Employment 37 Janitorial Services 43 Security Services 120,000,000 106,800,000 204,000,000 03 MINOR EQUIPMENT PURCHASES 001 General Administration 90,844,000 04 CURRENT TRANSFERS AND SUBSIDIES 006 Educational Institutions 011 Transfers to State Enterprises 02 National Schools Dietary Services Limited 330,781,250 248,000,000 05 CURRENT TRANSFERS TO STATUTORY BOARDS AND SIMILAR BODIES 004 Statutory Boards 13 Trinidad and Tobago National Commission for UNESCO 3,373,070 Table 10 - Major recurrent expenditure under sub- heads for fiscal 2011/2012 Table 10 revealed that expenditure on salaries and cost of living allowances for Ministry of Education’s staff; teachers at primary and secondary schools and other personnel of the Ministry accounted for a large proportion of personnel expenditure. These expenses totalled onebillionninehundredandtwentyonemillion dollars ($1,921,000,000). This represents 93.4% of total personnel expenditure ($2,056,023,000) for the fiscal 2012. Goods and services also accounted for a substantial proportion of the budget and included payments for utility expenses (rent, water and sewerage, telephone, electricity) and repairs and maintenance to buildings which are very costly and expensive. However, the greatest contributors to goods and services expenditure are contract employment and the provision of janitorial and security services. Large lump sums are spent on the hiring of employees on

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