©        PROJECT A.C.C.E.S.S.Advanced Communication Community Emergency Services Support
Problem StatementCell & other communication infrastructuresare susceptible to natural disasters andpotentially to domestic...
Problem StatementAccording to the National Hurricane Center in a2007 report and the Annual Global Climate &Catastrophe Rep...
Who is Affected?Disaster conditions affect individuals as well asbusinesses, local, county and state services.Communicatio...
Who is Affected?During Katrina, the hearing impaired & deafpopulation were affected.The hurricane caused outages and loss ...
ImpactThe impact is equal for people and the localeconomies.Power and communication outages impactfamilies and first respo...
Benefits of Deploying A.C.C.E.S.S.Building the MobeeMesh infrastructure will enhancethe Public Safety Network and create a...
How the A.C.C.E.S.S. Network WorksMobee Communications has designed a Mobee phonethat integrades all the elements necessar...
Mobee Architecture                                Unmodified Mobile Client Device                                         ...
How the Mobee Communicator Works    1               2       MobeeMesh allows multiple access points                       ...
Number of Clients We Can Support  On a MobeeMesh node the maximum number of clients is limited  only by the internal memor...
Number of Clients We Can Support  As the size of the MobeeMesh network increases, more routing  tables need to be maintain...
Types of MobeeMesh Coverage • Comprehensive • Essential • Targeted                   (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
Types of MobeeMesh CoverageComprehensiveThis coverage level requires that the entire outdoor target area iscovered by a Wi...
Types of MobeeMesh CoverageEssentialThis coverage level is similar to Comprehensive Mesh coverage exceptthat some secondar...
Types of MobeeMesh CoverageTargetedThis coverage level applies either the Comprehensive or EssentialMesh coverage strategy...
Link Range and Access Density   Minimum Access Point Density Environment/CoverageOpen Space: Essential       4 per km2 / 9...
MobeeMesh Propagation Environments  • Clear Link  • Urban Line Of Sight (LOS)  • Suburban  • Indoor Open  • Indoor Clutter...
MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsClear LinkThe Clear Link environment has no obstructions on or near the line ofsight bet...
MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsUrban Line Of Sight (LOS)The Urban LOS environment represents along-street propagation,w...
MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsSuburbanThe Suburban environment typically consists of houses and trees ofsimilar height...
MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsIndoor OpenThe Indoor Open environment represents an indoor space with a highceiling and...
MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsIndoor ClutteredThe Indoor Cluttered environment represents an indoor space with alow ce...
Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. Network                               (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkPlanThis step would start from early preliminary information gathering to fulln...
Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkDeploymentThe process of determining AP placement is divided into two steps:pla...
Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkDeploymentAvailability of continuous AC power for NAPs. When considering AC pow...
Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkDeployment – Alternative Power Solutions by Mobee                              ...
Simple MobeeMesh Network with Redundancy                          To ensure network redundancy,                          a...
A Typical MobeeMesh Deployment at Hilton Head
A Typical MobeeMesh Deployment at Beaufort                                             1 sq.                              ...
One Community                                       “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”One A.C.C.E.S.S.          ...
One Community                                “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”Emergency Management Services    ...
One Community                                “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”Emergency Management Services    ...
One Community                                          “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”FCC Panel Reviewing the...
One Community                                    “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”FCC Panel Reviewing the Impac...
™      Mobee CommunicationsBuilding Services Around Community Needs                “meeting the challenges of the 21st cen...
A..C.C.E.S.S -  SC EMD
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A..C.C.E.S.S - SC EMD

  1. 1. © PROJECT A.C.C.E.S.S.Advanced Communication Community Emergency Services Support
  2. 2. Problem StatementCell & other communication infrastructuresare susceptible to natural disasters andpotentially to domestic and foreign terroristattacks. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  3. 3. Problem StatementAccording to the National Hurricane Center in a2007 report and the Annual Global Climate &Catastrophe Report of 2005, in Florida duringHurricane Wilma, 3.2 million customers,equivalent to 6 million people, lost power.In some areas cell phone services wereunavailable for up to two months. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  4. 4. Who is Affected?Disaster conditions affect individuals as well asbusinesses, local, county and state services.Communications become very difficult – landlines get disconnected by surge conditions ordamaged telephone poles. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  5. 5. Who is Affected?During Katrina, the hearing impaired & deafpopulation were affected.The hurricane caused outages and loss ofcommunications which made it difficult orimpossible to reach professionals whoprovided visual information through interpretingand other related services. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  6. 6. ImpactThe impact is equal for people and the localeconomies.Power and communication outages impactfamilies and first responders. 911 centersbecome overwhelmed by calls for assistance.The existing cell services get flooded withcalls to the point that the network begins tofail. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  7. 7. Benefits of Deploying A.C.C.E.S.S.Building the MobeeMesh infrastructure will enhancethe Public Safety Network and create a publicaccess network to help with information sharingamong Emergency Responders.It will allow residents to access emergency servicesanywhere the MobeeMesh is deployed.It will reduce the cost of communications betweenstate, county and city responders and emergencymanagement managers. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  8. 8. How the A.C.C.E.S.S. Network WorksMobee Communications has designed a Mobee phonethat integrades all the elements necessary to providesimple, inexpensive and high quality communications.The MobeeMesh network can be configured withvarious service providers to encompass a far widerrange of services. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  9. 9. Mobee Architecture Unmodified Mobile Client Device Applications DHCP Client ARP Mobee MeshInterface with Mobile Clients DHCP Server Interceptor Raw Socket Handoff Algorithm Pocket Proxy NAT Client Link Quality Destination Client Control Group Data Group Data Group Fishbone Communication Infrastructure Data Router Group Multicast Link-State Routing and Anycast 802.11 Wireless Mesh (UDP/IP Unicast) Internet
  10. 10. How the Mobee Communicator Works 1 2 MobeeMesh allows multiple access points to service the client during handoff. In MobeeMesh, packets sent by the mobile client are diverted from the kernel to the 3 Fishbone user-level overlay router. 4 MobeeMesh encapsulates client packets 5 and sends them through the overlay 6 network to the access points serving the destination. Once the pockets are received by the destination’s access points, MobeeMesh strips the overlay headers and forwards the 7 original packet to the mobile client using a raw socket. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  11. 11. Number of Clients We Can Support On a MobeeMesh node the maximum number of clients is limited only by the internal memory of the routers. The architecture maintains one entry in each routing table per client, which requires a total of 32 x N bytes in kernel memory, where N is the number of nodes in the MobeeMesh network. Example: A wireless router with a 16 MB of RAM, has only 5 MB available to be used for the routing. It can theoretically support at least 9000 mobile clients. In our architecture, this number is much greater because an entry is added in a routing table only if the router is on the path towards that client. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  12. 12. Number of Clients We Can Support As the size of the MobeeMesh network increases, more routing tables need to be maintained; however, as clients are likely to be spread evenly throughout the network, the number of entries maintained by each router does not significantly grow. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  13. 13. Types of MobeeMesh Coverage • Comprehensive • Essential • Targeted (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  14. 14. Types of MobeeMesh CoverageComprehensiveThis coverage level requires that the entire outdoor target area iscovered by a Wireless Mesh Network signal and that each Access Pointis able to establish links to at least two neighboring Access Points.This results in the highest density of Access Points, but eliminatessingle points of failure within the MobeeMesh. Typically, mobile nodescan access the network in most outdoor locations within the target area.There will be some areas such as alleyways and courtyardsthat will have limited coverage. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  15. 15. Types of MobeeMesh CoverageEssentialThis coverage level is similar to Comprehensive Mesh coverage exceptthat some secondary streets and unoccupied areas will not have fullcoverage. This allows for a lower density of Access Points while stillmaintaining coverage in essential outdoor areas of interest.A mix of Comprehensive and Essential Mesh coverage can be used toensure satisfactory coverage of large areas while lowering deploymentand maintenance costs. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  16. 16. Types of MobeeMesh CoverageTargetedThis coverage level applies either the Comprehensive or EssentialMesh coverage strategy to only select areas within the targeted city.This allows for deployment of Wireless Mesh Network coverage at keylocations within a city such as the downtown core, convention areas,tourist areas, ports, and transportation centers. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  17. 17. Link Range and Access Density Minimum Access Point Density Environment/CoverageOpen Space: Essential 4 per km2 / 9 per sq. mi.Open Space: Comprehensive 6 per km2 / 16 per sq. mi.Urban LOS: Essential 6 per km2 / 16 per sq. mi.Urban LOS: Comprehensive 19 per km2 / 49 per sq. mi.Suburban: Essential 6 per km2 / 16 per sq. mi.Suburban: Comprehensive 32 per km2 / 81 per sq. mi. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  18. 18. MobeeMesh Propagation Environments • Clear Link • Urban Line Of Sight (LOS) • Suburban • Indoor Open • Indoor Cluttered (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  19. 19. MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsClear LinkThe Clear Link environment has no obstructions on or near the line ofsight between the transmitter and the receiver. The Clear Linkenvironment represents the most benign environment a MobeeMeshnode can encounter. MobeeMesh nodes must be mounted at least 10meters above ground level to achieve a Clear Link environment. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  20. 20. MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsUrban Line Of Sight (LOS)The Urban LOS environment represents along-street propagation,where there is a line of sight between the transmitter and the receiver.Obstructions near the line of sight cause RF propagation path loss;ground and wall reflections cause RF fading. MobeeMesh nodes aretypically mounted less than 10 meters above ground level in an urbanLOS environment. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  21. 21. MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsSuburbanThe Suburban environment typically consists of houses and trees ofsimilar heights. The Suburban environment has a mixture of LOS andnon-LOS conditions for transit links and generally non-LOS conditionsfor access links. Significant clutter results in a highly variable RFpropagation path loss for any given range; propagation can be as goodas the urban LOS environment, or worse than the Cluttered Indoorenvironment. MobeeMesh nodes are typically mounted on lightstandards at or just above rooftop level. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  22. 22. MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsIndoor OpenThe Indoor Open environment represents an indoor space with a highceiling and largely unobstructed propagation conditions such asairports, shopping malls, and warehouses. Minor obstructions, such asthose due to superstructure or internal partitions, result in minor RFpropagation path loss. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  23. 23. MobeeMesh Propagation EnvironmentsIndoor ClutteredThe Indoor Cluttered environment represents an indoor space with alow ceiling and internal partitions such as open plan offices andresidential dwellings. Propagation is generally non-LOS, resulting insignificant RF propagation path loss. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  24. 24. Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. Network (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  25. 25. Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkPlanThis step would start from early preliminary information gathering to fullnetwork design. This step is very critical to reduce the need for prolongeddebugging and troubleshooting of the network. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  26. 26. Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkDeploymentThe process of determining AP placement is divided into two steps:placement estimation and site survey.To assist with placement estimation, consider the following: placement of Network Access Points (NAP) such as determining the availability of wired or wireless backhaul services. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  27. 27. Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkDeploymentAvailability of continuous AC power for NAPs. When considering AC poweravailability, it is very important to determine if AC power is available 100% ofthe time or if the power is only available during a portion of the day. Forinstance, some outdoor lamp posts are centrally switched and do not haveAC power during daylight hours. In such cases, an AC-backup supply thatmeets local environmental and regulatory requirements can be used.Accessibility to desired location such as landlord permission and physicalaccess. It is very important to determine if permission must be obtained froma landlord or utility before servicing an AP. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  28. 28. Building the MobeeMesh A.C.C.E.S.S. NetworkDeployment – Alternative Power Solutions by Mobee (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  29. 29. Simple MobeeMesh Network with Redundancy To ensure network redundancy, a design must have multiple NAPs’ to reduce single points of failure. As shown in Figure A, the NAP network is designed in such a way that whenever an AP fails N there is still adequate mesh N coverage. N NAP Figure: A (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  30. 30. A Typical MobeeMesh Deployment at Hilton Head
  31. 31. A Typical MobeeMesh Deployment at Beaufort 1 sq. Evacuation routes mile Community Neighborhoods Shelters/Emergency
  32. 32. One Community “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”One A.C.C.E.S.S. Emergency Management Services State City County (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  33. 33. One Community “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”Emergency Management Services (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  34. 34. One Community “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”Emergency Management Services A.C.C.E.S.S. (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  35. 35. One Community “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”FCC Panel Reviewing the Impact of Katrina on Communication NetworksThe Report gave the nation’s communication system a failing gradeand listed building an effective communications system as one of its top 1Priorities. 1 Emergency Preparedness and Emergency Communication Access: Lessons Learned Since 9/11 and Recommendations, available at http://www.nvrc.org/content.aspx?page=2451&section=5 (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  36. 36. One Community “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”FCC Panel Reviewing the Impact of Katrina on Communication NetworksRecommendations that were reinforced by Katrina experiences are: • The critical need for additional redundancy to ensure effective communication during preparation, notification, response, and recovery. • The need to develop a visually accessible communication system that can operate with off-the-self products. • The need to better equip shelters and train providers to ensure effective communication with deaf and hard of hearing evacuees. Released in December 2004 (c) 2008 Mobee Communications
  37. 37. ™ Mobee CommunicationsBuilding Services Around Community Needs “meeting the challenges of the 21st century”

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