In one of the first shots in our preliminary task, the powerful position of the main character is established by framing h...
To introduce a second, less powerful character, this shot is composed so that the weaker character is smaller and below th...
The costume of the second character and the juxtaposition with that of the first overtly shows the difference social statu...
Aided by the post processed colour grading, shadow emphasises covers the upper sections of the character’s faces, presenti...
In this example of a shot/reverse/shot, the second shot of this character the camera is closer to him than the the shot of...
This shot breaks the 180° rule as it signifies the importance of the case, which is the major prop in our sequence. Again,...
The 180° rule is no longer broken, but the case still remains the key object in the scene by again being placed centrally ...
This shot creates suspense as the case is revealed as coming out from behind another prop. This suspense is linked to the ...
To show the importance of the case even over the dominant character, a very shallow focal depth is used to that the case i...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

9 shotanalysis JF

866 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
866
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
151
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

9 shotanalysis JF

  1. 2. In one of the first shots in our preliminary task, the powerful position of the main character is established by framing him central. His alignment with the table and chair in front emphasise this. The use of dark costume which highly contrasts with the background also helps achieve this. Accompanying this is the desaturated blue hue grading which not only is a convention to many modern films of the thriller genre, but also aids the viewer in picking out the key, red objects in the scene, such as the chair.
  2. 3. To introduce a second, less powerful character, this shot is composed so that the weaker character is smaller and below the powerful figure, even though he is standing up. The 180° rule is used so that the viewer is less likely to be confused over the layout of the scene and the position of the characters within it.
  3. 4. The costume of the second character and the juxtaposition with that of the first overtly shows the difference social status each character has, with the contrast between the beanie and trilby being perhaps the most obvious. This media principle of “show, don’t tell” is used widely in the thriller genre.
  4. 5. Aided by the post processed colour grading, shadow emphasises covers the upper sections of the character’s faces, presenting the audience with an enigma as to who they are. Shadow is used throughout the thriller genre to create an effect of mystery and suspense. The 180° rule in is use again.
  5. 6. In this example of a shot/reverse/shot, the second shot of this character the camera is closer to him than the the shot of him previously and allows us to see his facial expressions clearly. Reaction shots are used, but throughout, and not restricted to, the thriller genre, and is a conventional method in showing a character’s emotions regarding events where no dialogue is needed.
  6. 7. This shot breaks the 180° rule as it signifies the importance of the case, which is the major prop in our sequence. Again, to demonstrate power and importance, the shot is composed with the case as central.
  7. 8. The 180° rule is no longer broken, but the case still remains the key object in the scene by again being placed centrally in the shot. This shot and the shot previously are a match on action, which is used to how the case ended placed on the desk.
  8. 9. This shot creates suspense as the case is revealed as coming out from behind another prop. This suspense is linked to the enigma: “What is in the case”. Enigmas are a key theme in the thriller genre, which is why the inside of the case is not visible.
  9. 10. To show the importance of the case even over the dominant character, a very shallow focal depth is used to that the case is in focus rather than his hands, which adds to the suspense present in the scene.

×