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Preparing a rubric

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This will take you through the process of preparing to create a Smart Rubric.

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Preparing a rubric

  1. 1. Preparing to create a simple rubric 1. Interpreting an existing rubric 2. Building a matrix 3. Writing level descriptors 4. Defining grade boundaries 5. Preparing more complex rubrics
  2. 2. Interpreting an existing rubric
  3. 3. Level 4 (8-10 marks): • The student is able to construct a sophisticated and well-supported analysis of a historical event. • There is a range of evidence used appropriately from a variety of sources • Strong command of spelling and grammar enhances the argument. Level 3 (5-7 marks): • The student is able to interpret a historical event in light of evidence • There is a range of evidence used, mainly appropriately, from more than one type of source. • The argument is communicated effectively with few or minor errors of spelling and grammar. Level 2 (3-4 marks): • The student is able to explain a historical event in some detail. • Simple, but generally appropriate, references made to primary and/or secondary sources. • There may be minor errors of spelling and grammar that do not obscure meaning. Level 1 (1-2 marks): • The student is able to make simple comment on a historical event. • General reference is made to the historical context. • Errors of spelling and grammar obscure meaning. Let’s say you are using this simple history paper rubric.
  4. 4. Before you begin… • Be clear about what it is you are assessing. Break your rubric down into strands (skills or assessment objectives) and bands (levels or degrees of competency) • A well-designed rubric is an effective teaching tool. Badly designed rubrics will slow you down when you mark and will not provide effective feedback to your students. • If you would like help creating a SmartRubric rubric from a mark scheme, syllabus or task, please contact caroline@pinemarteneducation.com
  5. 5. • You want to asses three strands: • Analysis - the student’s ability to interpret evidence and form a cogent argument • Evidence - the ability to use appropriate reference to primary and secondary sources to support an argument • Literacy - the ability to use standard English appropriately and effectively to communicate ideas.
  6. 6. • There are 4 bands • Level 4: confident • Level 3: secure • Level 2: basic • Level 1: minimal
  7. 7. Building a matrix
  8. 8. SmartRubric rubrics are expressed as matrices - like so: Level 1 (1-2 marks) Level 2 (3-4 marks) Level 3 (5-7 marks) Level 4 (8-10 marks) Analysis Evidence Literacy If you aren’t used to thinking of rubrics in matrix form, sketch it out before you start building one on SmartRubric the first few times
  9. 9. Phrase your level descriptors in terms of what the student can do, not what they can’t do. Level 1 (1-2 marks) Level 2 (3-4 marks) Level 3 (5-7 marks) Level 4 (8-10 marks) Analysis The student can make simple comments about a historical event. The student can explain a historical event in some detail. The student can interpret a historical event in light of evidence. The student can construct a sophisticated and well-supported analysis of a historical event. Evidence The student can refer to the historical context. The student can refer to some appropriate historical evidence in a simple way. The student can use a range of evidence, mainly appropriately, from more than one type of source. The student can use range of evidence from a variety of sources appropriately. Literacy The student can attempt to communicate simple ideas clearly; errors of spelling and grammar sometimes obscure meaning. The student can communicate simple ideas clearly; errors of spelling and grammar do not obscure meaning. The student can communicate effectively with few or minor errors of spelling and grammar. The student can enhance the argument with a strong command of spelling and grammar.
  10. 10. Writing level descriptors
  11. 11. Writing effective level descriptors is key Good level descriptors • Begin with ‘the student can…’ • Are positive • Refer to specific, measurable objectives The student can refer to some appropriate historical evidence in a simple way. The student can use evidence The student can attempt to communicate clearly; although frequent errors of spelling sometimes obscure meaning. Spelling is terrible!
  12. 12. Why is the phrasing on level descriptors so important? Level descriptors in SmartRubric do a lot of heavy lifting. SmartRubric generates targets for students, and it uses the level descriptor from the next level up to do it. The student can refer to some appropriate historical evidence in a simple way. What you see: You can refer to some appropriate historical evidence in a simple way. What the student sees: To improve, refer to some appropriate historical evidence in a simple way. What the student sees (target):
  13. 13. Defining grade boundaries
  14. 14. When you mark work using SmartRubric, the system calculates point scores and assigns grades for you. Level 1 (1-2 marks) Level 2 (3-4 marks) Level 3 (5-7 marks) Level 4 (8-10 marks) Analysis The student can make simple comments about a historical event. The student can explain a historical event in some detail. The student can interpret a historical event in light of evidence. The student can construct a sophisticated and well-supported analysis of a historical event. Evidence The student can refer to the historical context. The student can refer to some appropriate historical evidence in a simple way. The student can use a range of evidence, mainly appropriately, from more than one type of source. The student can use range of evidence from a variety of sources appropriately. Literacy The student can attempt to communicate simple ideas clearly; errors of spelling and grammar sometimes obscure meaning. The student can communicate simple ideas clearly; errors of spelling and grammar do not obscure meaning. The student can communicate effectively with few or minor errors of spelling and grammar. The student can enhance the argument with a strong command of spelling and grammar. The student is at level 3 for Analysis and Literacy, but 4 for use of evidence. Overall, that means the student is around the top of Level 3. SmartRubric uses the number of points available in each band to calculate the exact score — in this case, 7 marks out of a possible 10, or 70%.
  15. 15. You can assign grade boundaries so that the point/percentage score is given as a letter grade or other level. • Formal mark schemes from exam boards often have grade boundary information from previous years available online. • Schools may have their own system — using letter grades, numbers, colours (such as red, yellow and green), or words or phrases (such as emerging, developing or secure). • SmartRubric is designed to be a flexible tool that can slot into these different contexts. • Before you being making a rubric on SmartRubric, consider your grade boundaries.
  16. 16. In our simple rubric, grade boundaries look like this: • A* 90% and up • A 80% and up • B 70% and up • C 60% and up • D 50% and up • U 0% and up The student with 7 marks out of 10 would get a B (don’t worry, he or she would also see the real score)
  17. 17. Preparing more complex rubrics
  18. 18. This example covers an extremely simple rubric SmartRubric also has you covered if your rubric is: 1. In the form of a checklist (either the student has done it - full marks, or hasn’t - no marks) - don’t add any extra bands. All SmartRubric matrices start out as checklists. 2. Has more than one component (such as an exam with several questions or a project with several tasks) - use separate tabs 3. Is one task but has a subset of skills that are evaluated against a different number of levels (such as a paper where content is marked out of 40 and literacy is marked separately out of 10) - use separate tabs

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