Social Networking in Higher Education

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Workshop presentation for Ascilite 2011, Hobart (4 December, 2011)

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  • Potential to be your most powerful learning tool – learning takes place every day/hour/minute/second.
  • Potential to be your most powerful learning tool – learning takes place every day/hour/minute/second.Shirley - Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) @swinburne.
  • Potential to be your most powerful learning tool – learning takes place every day/hour/minute/second.Shirley - Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) @swinburne.
  • Potential to be your most powerful learning tool – learning takes place every day/hour/minute/second.Shirley - Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) @swinburne.
  • Potential to be your most powerful learning tool – learning takes place every day/hour/minute/second.Shirley - Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) @swinburne.
  • Social Networking in Higher Education

    1. 1. SOCIAL NETWORKINGIN HIGHER EDUCATION Leanne Cameron and Miriam Tanti leanne.cameron@acu.edu.au | miriam.tanti@acu.edu.au Australian Catholic University
    2. 2. Contents• Introduction: what is social networking?• Practical: exploring – Twitter – Social bookmarking – FaceBook fan page – Edmodo• Investigate: Social networking in higher education• Evaluate: moral, ethical and legal implications
    3. 3. What is social networking?• Social media - various avenues through which people share information, public or private, with a select group of people.• Social networking - the act of exchanging information, personal or public, through various forms of technology, such as the Internet, mobile phones, and other services.Source: http://ashleyanderson.suite101.com/what-is-social-networking-a235550#ixzz1dvmvA5MM
    4. 4. TWITTER
    5. 5. Twitter• Personal Learning Network (PLN) or Community of Practice• Increasing your connections with others• Benefits: – exposure to new ideas – resources – Collaboration – reflection – evaluation – broaden our perspectives, beyond the local, into a more global, world-view
    6. 6. Twitter• NOT Facebook status• 140 character broadcast• following (@shirleyleitch, @thesiswhisperer)• followers• @• #• Reply• RT (retweet)
    7. 7. AssessmentReflective MicroblogAs a means of establishing a reflective microblog, each of you will createa twitter account. Your twitter account will enable you to engage deeplywith the lecture and tutorial content by encouraging you to posequestions, add content or pursue points presented. Your account willalso enable you to undertake professional conversations with othereducators, it will also be used to keep your peers informed of yourschool experiences, allow them to offer support and advice and topromote the sharing of educational resources and other tweets thatmay be of relevance. - All tweets must end with the following hashtag #ACUedu_s - Original tweets must be made on a weekly (minimum) basis - Re-tweets must also be made on a weekly (minimum) basis - Internet etiquette must be adhered to at all times
    8. 8. AssessmentReflective MicroblogAs a means of establishing a reflective microblog, each of you will createa twitter account. Your twitter account will enable you to engage deeplywith the lecture and tutorial content by encouraging you to posequestions, add content or pursue points presented. Your account willalso enable you to undertake professional conversations with othereducators, it will also be used to keep your peers informed of yourschool experiences, allow them to offer support and advice and topromote the sharing of educational resources and other tweets thatmay be of relevance. - All tweets must end with the following hashtag #ACUedu_s - Original tweets must be made on a weekly (minimum) basis - Re-tweets must also be made on a weekly (minimum) basis - Internet etiquette must be adhered to at all times
    9. 9. AssessmentYou will be assessed on both quantity and quality of your onlineparticipation/contributions. By quantity, you are expected to make broadcasts totwitter each week. For quality, you should try to engage in critical thinking andanalysis. To initiate a discussion, your broadcast should show analyses, insights,observations and reflections. To respond to your peers postings, your replyshould advance the discussion by making references to other sources, readings orother broadcasts. Tactics for you to achieve this include asking for clarifications,posing questions, and offering different perspectives. As a general rule, youshould keep your postings brief, encourage others to comment and respond; andrespect others perspectives.The reflective microblog must include:- Discussion and evaluation of your personal contribution: you are required tosubmit three of your best twitter broadcasts (screen shots or other forms ofevidence) and a paragraph on each explaining why you think these are your bestcontributions (supported by theories/principles read/discussed in this unit)- Reflection on the process: reflect on the experience of having a PersonalLearning Network and discuss the knowledge, skills and expertise you havedeveloped through this process.
    10. 10. SOCIAL BOOKMARKING
    11. 11. Social bookmarking sites• Digg• Delicious• Diigo• Pageflakes
    12. 12. EDMODO vsFACEBOOK FAN PAGE
    13. 13. Literature: Social networkingAlexander, B. (2008) Social Networking in Higher Education. The Tower and the Cloud: Higher Education in the Age of Cloud Computing. EDUCAUSE: USA http://lcc.lipscomb.edu/uploads/24663.pdf#page=219Alderton, E. Brunsell, E. Bariexca, D. (2011). The End Of Isolation. MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 7(3). http://jolt.merlot.org/vol7no3/alderton_0911.pdfCasey, G. & Evans, T (2011). Designing for Learning: Online Social Networks as a Classroom Environment. The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 12(7). http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/1011/2021M.D. Roblyer, McDaniel, M., Webb, M., Herman, J., Vince J., Findings on Facebook in higher education: A comparison of college faculty and student uses and perceptions of social networking sites, The Internet and Higher Education, 13(3) http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1096751610000278)
    14. 14. Ensuring safe and efficient learning environment• Concerns about social networking in educational settings• The ‘systemic’ view of social networking in educational settings• Ethical dilemmas
    15. 15. Concerns of teachers• Many teachers shy away from using Social Media in their classrooms because of safety or classroom management concerns.• However, if its use is not accompanied by a structured task, students can lose focus and become inefficient learners.
    16. 16. Main areas of teacher concern:• Sharing of personal details and photographs;• Copyright infringement;• Defamation; and• Bullying, harassment and offensive material. AACE research, 2011
    17. 17. CEO defines social networkingSchools differentiate between online communitysites and personal social networking sites:• Online community sites such as nings, wikis and some educational blogs are used primarily for collaboration and shared knowledge construction.• Personal social networking sites are centered on an individual rather than a group and include Facebook, MySpace and other related sites. Such sites are used primarily for sharing personal information such as photos and updates.
    18. 18. CEO Staff are required to educate students using social media of any kind to:• Respect themselves and others when publishing or communicating online;• Keep communication channels transparent and supervised by adults;• Create a sensible/ plain username or identity;• Set social network sites to the “private” security setting;• Keep personal information private;• Not share usernames and passwords with anyone;• Report any attacks or inappropriate content directed at them.http://www.ceosyd.catholic.edu.au/Parents/Curriculum/Documents/pol-socialmedia-staff.pdf
    19. 19. From the DEC, NSW Australia “Conversations in social media are a dialogue, an opportunity to listen, share, collaborate and respond to our colleagues and communities. We recognise the importance of participating in these conversations. Because the social media space is relatively new, and comments may be public and potentially permanent, we’ve developed these guidelines to support staff as they engage in any conversations or interactions using digital media for official, professional and personal use.”https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/technology/communication/socmed_guide.pdf
    20. 20. Australian Council for Computers in Education(ACCE)• ACCE firmly supports the potential educational affordances of online communication, including social media.• Teachers at all levels are demonstrating innovative and educationally rewarding uses.
    21. 21. Lessons to be learnt from the studies:• The adoption of an approach based on appropriately managing risks, not inhibiting use• Educating students about the dangers• Unilateral policies regarding removal, or blocking, social networking sites, do not recognise the potentially valuable outcomes they may afford.
    22. 22. Ethical dilemmas• You decide …

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