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Gary's Miller Spotlight Community Plan 2015

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Neighborhood Spotlight is a new initiative for strategic investments in community development. The Legacy Foundation has made a major commitment to relational place-making where leaders and citizens are fostering positive community change and becoming stronger, more vibrant neighborhoods that enhance regional vitality. Neighborhood Spotlight represents a collaborative approach to community development. Citizens, community-based organizations and community members from the public, private and non-profit sectors will work together to Organize, Decide and Act upon issues important to them. Neighborhood Spotlight provides a framework for capacity-building, planning and implementation block by block. It is modeled after successful community development work in Indianapolis and Chicago. A convening organization, usually a community-based organization, will spearhead the coordination of neighborhood relationships. With support from Legacy Foundation staff and consultants, Neighborhood Spotlight communities will organize, decide and act upon projects that can profoundly change their future.

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Gary's Miller Spotlight Community Plan 2015

  1. 1. Miller Neighborhood Gary, Indiana Collective Impact Plan
  2. 2. Acknowledgements Executive Summary 1 Our Vision 2 Neighborhood Background 3 Background to Collective Impact 12 Early Projects 16 Work Plan 19 Area Context 20 Education, Youth and Child Programming 24 Environment and Ecotourism 33 Jobs and the Economy 38 Property and Blight 45 Safety and Code Enforcement 53 Transportation and Infrastructure 60 Next Steps 70 Contents
  3. 3. Miller Collective Impact Plan Acknowledgements: We couldn’t have begun this process without the help of a lot of people and organizations from throughout the Miller neighborhood. We’d like to thank all of the residents and stakeholders who offered their time, ideas, and energy to make this plan come together, and especially those who’ve helped us get started on the work. In particular, our appreciation goes to Miller Garden Club, Douglas Learning Center, Wirt-Emerson VPA, St. Mary's of the Lake, Gary International Black Film Festival, Communal Services, Miller Little League, Catholic Charities, My Safari Prep Academy, Beach Front Dance School, Family Folklore Foundation, Geminus - Head Start, Crisis Center Inc., Lake St. Gallery, Miller Beach Cafe and Flamingo Pizza of Miller for all donating their time, talents and treasures in various ways for our community collective. Thank you to Karren Lee and the Miller Beach Arts and Creative District for agreeing to be the backbone organization. Of course, a big shout out goes to our community builder, Jessie Renslow, who came home to Miller to help guide this process and push it forward. Thanks to Marquette Park United Methodist Church for donating office space for our community builder. A special thanks goes to all of our Steering Committee members for all their volunteer time and help: Zully Alvarado, Terry Cera, Susie Galantee, Sue Kallimani, Richard Leverett, Rasheedah Muhammad, Terry Payonk, Derreka Rollins, Meg Roman, Tim Petrites and Rebecca Wyatt. We’d also like to thank the Legacy Foundation for selecting the Miller neighborhood to participate in Neighborhood Spotlight. Thanks also to the Indiana Association for Community Economic Development (IACED) for providing capacity building training and technical assistance throughout the process.
  4. 4. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 1 Neighborhood Spotlight is a new initiative for strategic investments in community development. The Legacy Foundation has made a major commitment to relational place-making where leaders and citizens are fostering positive community change and becoming stronger, more vibrant neighborhoods that enhance regional vitality. Neighborhood Spotlight represents a collaborative approach to community development. Citizens, community-based organizations and community members from the public, private and non-profit sectors will work together to Organize, Decide and Act upon issues important to them. Neighborhood Spotlight provides a framework for capacity-building, planning and implementation block by block. It is modeled after successful community development work in Indianapolis and Chicago. A convening organization, usually a community-based organization, will spearhead the coordination of neighborhood relationships. With support from Legacy Foundation staff and consultants, Neighborhood Spotlight communities will organize, decide and act upon projects that can profoundly change their future. Methodology The Legacy Foundation conducted trainings over the course of 2014, in which community members from neighborhoods teamed up with a local non-for profit (Convening Organization) to learn about and apply to the Neighborhood Spotlight initiative. The Legacy Foundation then selected two communities to pilot the program in Northwest Indiana. The Legacy Foundation granted Gary-Miller’s Convening Organization, Miller Beach Arts and Creative District, one of two Neighborhood Spotlight distinctions. Gary-Miller hired a community builder, Jessica Renslow. The Miller Spotlight Steering Committee was then formed to help carry out their community quality of life study. How the Community was Chosen Gary’s Miller Community was chosen by Legacy Foundation for the following reasons: Gary-Miller’s proximity to the lakefront is a notable asset as is the renovation of its Marquette Park and the historic Pavilion. Several Gary-Miller structures have historical significance with a number of them on the National Register. Collaborative bodies are working in the community and include those focused on civic engagement, professional development, philanthropic resources, and safety concerns. Source: www.legacyfdn.org/neighborhood-spotlight Executive Summary
  5. 5. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 2 Our VisionOur Vision: Miller in 2025 Miller is a beautiful, high density, universally designed neighborhood in Gary, Indiana, known as an active arts community and a destination for beach and waterfront recreation. Miller provides quality education and programs for its youth and a variety of activities for residents of all ages. Inviting gateways and transit options make Miller accessible to visitors from throughout the region, and Miller’s inclusive community design make it easy for residents and visitors alike to enjoy the area’s activities and natural environment. A vibrant downtown supports a strong business community and provides quality employment opportunities. Resident leadership and initiative create a thriving, safe, and inclusive neighborhood with government, philanthropic, and business support enriching those initiatives. The Miller neighborhood is a vibrant and functional community to live, work, and play in.
  6. 6. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 3 Our Vision Gary’s Miller neighborhood is a community located on the southernmost shore of Lake Michigan. When Lake Michigan first entered recorded history in the early 1600s, the land at the lake's southern end was populated by the Miami people. By 1640, the Miami had been driven from the region by the Beaver Wars. The Potawatomi moved in from the north to replace them. The Potawatomi frequently came into the areas now within the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore to hunt, fish and gather food including wild rice. The Odawa people also hunted deer there in the winter. French missionary Father Jacques Marquette passed along the south shore of Lake Michigan in 1675, attempting to return to Canada after he had fallen gravely ill on the Mississippi River. According to local tradition, Marquette camped for a night at the mouth of the Grand Calumet River in present-day Marquette Park, shortly before his death. As the United States expanded westward in the early 19th century, the Potawatomi were removed from Indiana through a series of treaties and forced removals in the 1820s and 1830s. Indian Boundary Road in Miller marks the border of a tract ceded in one such treaty, the 1826 Treaty of Mississinwas, which used the southern end of Lake Michigan as the tract's southern limit. By 1836, the Potawatomi nation had been deprived of all of its lands throughout Indiana. Some Potawatomi, however, remained in the Miller Beach area as landowners, including Simon Pokagon, second chief of the Pokagon Band. Other Potawatomi continued to visit the region in the spring and summer into the late 19th century. Neighborhood Background
  7. 7. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 4 As white settlement spread across the Upper Midwest in the 19th century, many promoters and speculators sought to attract settlers and commercial development to the Calumet Region, but were defeated by the difficult terrain and lack of transportation. In 1833, an inn called the Bennett Tavern was built at the mouth of the Grand Calumet River, serving the Detroit-Chicago stagecoaches that ran along the shoreline. It stood for only a few years. The first man to plat a town in modern-day Miller Beach was Indian trader Joseph Bailly, who in 1833 platted a "Town of Bailly" at the mouth of the Grand Calumet, in present-day Marquette Park. But nothing came of the Town of Bailly or the "Indiana City" laid out nearby in 1837. In 1837, the area that would become downtown Miller was purchased and platted by Indian traders William and George Ewing and George H. Walker. The plat bore the name of "Ewing's Subdivision", as the lots within it still do. Development in Ewing's Subdivision took off when the railroad arrived in 1851. With the coming of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern Railway in 1851, a train stop first called "Miller's Station" and later "Miller's Junction" or "Miller's", and ultimately "Miller", was established in the present-day downtown area of Miller Beach. A railroad town from its inception, Miller would later also be served by the B&O Railroad beginning in 1874 and the South Shore Line beginning in 1908. The person for whom the town was named is unknown. An early railroad agent recalled the name as coming from a construction engineer named John Miller who lived in the area, and at whose home the early trains would stop for water and wood between LaPorte and Chicago. Other possible namesakes include an innkeeper for whom train crews dropped off milk, and a foreman who buried his son nearby. Swedes began to migrate to the United States in large numbers in the 1860s as a result of the famines in Scandinavia, and some of these immigrants settled in Miller. The Swedish- and German-Americans of early Miller drew their livelihood from sand mining, ice harvesting, and railroad maintenance. Miller remained very small in this period; only twelve families were present in 1870. Miller
  8. 8. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 5 acquired its first schoolhouse in the 1860s, and its own post office in 1879. Beginning in the 1880s, the town hosted a small commercial sturgeon and whitefish fishery, with fishermen bringing in sturgeon weighing as much as 200 pounds. The combination of proximity to Chicago and a pristine natural environment soon drew visitors from the city. Among them was aviation pioneer Octave Chanute, who staged a series of experimental flights from the 70-foot dunes near Lake Street Beach in 1896. Around the same time, the pioneering botanist Henry Chandler Cowles conducted early studies of ecological succession in Miller Woods. In subsequent decades, the Chicago film industry used the Miller dunes and beaches as backdrops in numerous silent films set in exotic locales. Among these were films by the Selig Polyscope Company, and the Chicago Essanay Studios productions The Plum Tree (1914) and The Fall of Montezuma (1912), in which the Miller beach represented the coast of Mexico. In the 1910s, the Gary city government and US Steel became increasingly aware of the need for a lakefront park for the millworkers and their families. In view of this, Miller and Gary formed a joint parks department in 1915 to administer part of the land that is now Marquette Park. In 1918, the town board voted to accept annexation, ending Miller's political independence. After its annexation, the community continued to grow. So did its tourist industry: Drusilla Carr, proprietress of Carr's Beach (now Lake Street Beach), collected rent on more than a hundred beach cottages. With attractions including a shooting gallery, bath house, miniature railroad and "night spots," Carr's Beach was Gary's most popular summer destination in the late 1920s. With the construction and expansion of Marquette Park in the 1930s and an influx of affluent residents from other parts of Gary in the late 1940s, the neighborhood became increasingly a resort
  9. 9. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 6 community. It also became a segregated white community, with African-Americans banned from the beaches, and also from the neighborhood except for day workers. In 1967, Richard Hatcher was elected mayor of Gary, becoming one of the first African-American mayors of any major US city. The voting in his election was almost entirely along racial lines, with white Democrats voting en masse for the Republican candidate in the general election. A key exception to this was in Miller Beach, where Hatcher obtained decisive support from a group of primarily Jewish Millerites who had opposed the Wallace presidential campaign in 1968 and had subsequently supported Hatcher in his bid for the Gary Common Council. Fearing that the white flight occurring elsewhere in Gary would be replicated in Miller, local residents formed the Miller Citizens Corporation (MCC) in 1971. Unlike similar groups elsewhere in the city, the goal of the MCC was not to prevent integration, but to slow the process so that events did not spiral out of control. The MCC worked to stem flight from the community with strategies such as positive publicity about Miller's advantages and banning "For Sale" signs. As part of this effort, the organization also took on environmental issues, including banning sand mining in residential areas. The National Lakeshore was founded in 1966 through the efforts of Senator Paul Douglas, ending a struggle that had begun in the 1890s. The Lakeshore's initial boundaries, however, did not include the Miller Woods and Long Lake areas in Miller Beach. After the death of Senator Douglas in 1976, a Lakeshore expansion
  10. 10. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 7 bill gained bipartisan support in Congress, as a memorial to him. With the bill's passage, the Lakeshore was expanded by 4,300 acres, including Miller Woods and Long Lake. In 2002, faced with plummeting property tax revenue due to a state-imposed change in assessments of industrial property, the city of Gary nearly doubled tax rates, leading to widespread outcry. Together with other organizations around the state, the Miller Citizens Corporation lobbied successive state governments to impose tax caps. The tax caps became law in 2008 and became part of the state constitution in 2010. Less than an hour from downtown Chicago by car, Miller Beach has attracted Chicagoans as tourists and residents for more than a century. The community is within a mile of exits on four major interstates, and is also served by South Shore Line commuter trains. Having defied regional trends toward racial polarization and environmental degradation, Miller Beach exhibits extraordinary socioeconomic, racial and biodiversity. The community has been described as "an island of integration and natural beauty.” Thanks to the Miller Historical Society for providing images for this section. Please check out www.millerhistoricalsociety.webs.com for more information. Other Sources: Smith, S. & Mark, S. (2009). The Historical Roots of the Nature Conservancy in the Northwest Indiana/Chicagoland Region: From Science to Preservation. The South Shore Journal, 3. http://www.southshorejournal.org/index.php/issues/volume-3-2009/83-journals/vol-3-2009/75- the-historical-roots-of-the-nature-conservancy-in-the-northwest-indianachicagoland-region-from-science-to-preservation Lane, James B. (1979). City of the century: a history of Gary, Indiana. ISBN 0-253-11187-0. Lane, James B.; Cohen, Ronald. (1983). Gary, Indiana: A Pictorial History. ISBN 1-57864-210-8
  11. 11. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 8 Miller Neighborhood Spotlight Map
  12. 12. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 9 Miller Neighborhood Timeline
  13. 13. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 10 Miller Neighborhood Statistics1  1.7% of the population is Hispanic  3.6% of the population speaks a language other than English at home. Of this group, 77% speak English “very well”  31% of the population was below poverty level within the past 12 months; an additional 8.7% were between 100% and 150% of the poverty level  8.8% of households have no vehicle available  The unemployment rate in Miller is 15% 1 Note: Statistics were taken from the U.S. Census Bureau for Lake County, Indiana, Census Tracts 101 and 102.01. These tracts include some area outside of the Miller Spotlight footprint; namely, Tract 102.01 goes south to the border of Gary and Lake Station and west just past New Hampshire St. Unless otherwise noted, Census data is taken from the American Community Survey 2009-2013 5-Year Estimate. 24% 5% 56% 15% Population by Age Groups Under 18 19-21 22-64 65+ 22.2% 72.6% 0.3% 0.5% 1.8% 0.3% 2.4% Population by Race White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Some other race Two or more races
  14. 14. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 11 8.9% 30.4% 34.6% 15.1% 11.0% Educational Attainment, Ages 25+ Less than high school graduate High school graduate (includes equivalency) Some college or associate's degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree 20.1% 9.0% 17.8% 10.6% 7.9% 6.4% 4.7% 10.2% Population by Income Less than $10,000 $10,000 to $14,999 $15,000 to $24,999 $25,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $64,999 $65,000 to $74,999 $75,000 or more
  15. 15. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 12 Our Vision Miller’s Collective Impact Plan is the culmination of a year of relationship-building and planning efforts. This plan is not final; it will continue to evolve with the emerging priorities and needs of the community as new opportunities are identified and past concerns are resolved. As a community, Miller seeks to participate in the revitalization efforts occurring within Gary via a place-based collective impact process. Collective Impact is based in five core principles, described at the end of this section. Miller created this plan as a participant in the Neighborhood Spotlight program of the Legacy Foundation. Neighborhood Spotlight is a new initiative for making strategic investments in communities. The Legacy Foundation has made a major commitment to relational place-making in which leaders and citizens are fostering positive community change to create stronger, more vibrant neighborhoods that enhance regional vitality. The Foundation launched Neighborhood Spotlight as a collaborative approach to community development. Through this program, community residents and stakeholders from the public, private and nonprofit sectors have worked together to identify their collective vision and priorities for Miller. Groups then worked together to create goals and action plans for achieving the vision. Planning Process Miller residents and stakeholders attended three training sessions over the course of 2014, in which they learned about the Neighborhood Spotlight process for collective impact. The group applied for this opportunity and formed a Steering Committee with the Miller Beach Arts and Creative District as the backbone organization. At the end of the year, Miller was selected by the Legacy Foundation as one of two communities that would participate in the program in 2015. Background to Collective Impact
  16. 16. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 13 The Miller Spotlight Steering Committee consists of eleven volunteers with a variety of backgrounds and connections within Miller. They hired a community builder, Jessie Renslow, to help carry out the planning process. Together the Steering Committee and Community Builder conducted over 200 one-on-one interviews, asking community leaders to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats in Miller today. The feedback was presented in a kickoff report in June 2015 and used as a basis for the vision statement written in July. Seven action groups were formed based on themes identified in the vision:  Area Context  Education, Youth and Child Programming  Environment and Ecotourism  Jobs and the Economy  Property and Blight  Safety and Code Enforcement  Transportation and Infrastructure Each action group recruited volunteers from all sectors within Miller to discuss their goals within the respective themes. Groups used the kickoff report, the vision statement, and other feedback to ensure that they addressed the needs and priorities of the whole community. After identifying goals, the groups wrote action plans to lay out how the goals would be achieved. Groups reached out to a variety of partners and got their commitment to support the plan and participate in the action steps. The goals and action plans presented in this document are just the beginning of Miller’s work to create a stronger, more vibrant community. Plans include steps that will take place over the next five years; over that time, new ideas and priorities will emerge as the goals here are accomplished and checked off the list. Miller will continue to revisit this plan, adding new partners, goals, and strategies, and celebrating the work that’s already been successful.
  17. 17. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 14 Five Principles of Collective Impact Principle 1: Common Agenda All participants have a shared vision for change including a common understanding of the problem and a joint approach to solving it through agreed upon actions. Miller stakeholders went through a visioning process in July 2015 and agreed to the vision at the beginning of the plan. Principle 2: Shared Measurement Collecting data and measuring results consistently across all participants to ensure efforts remain aligned and participants hold each other accountable. The action plans that accompany each plan goal include agreed-upon performance measures that will be tracked and reported back to monitor progress toward the goals. Principle 3: Mutually Reinforcing Activities Incentivizes projects and programs that are different while still being coordinated through a mutually reinforcing collective impact plan of action. Achieving the vision requires partners in all sectors to coordinate their efforts. The plan identifies what parties have committed to seeing each step of the plan through and also identifies partners who will provide support. By identifying the lead partner and laying steps out, activities can be coordinated to achieve greatest impact.
  18. 18. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 15 Principle 4: Continuous Communication Consistent and open communication across the participants and stakeholders to build trust, assure mutual objectives, and appreciate common motivation. The Community Builder has been a hub for communications throughout the planning process. The Steering Committee will discuss additional systems to put in place to ensure long-term communication. Principle 5: Backbone Support Managing collective impact with one convening organization playing a “quarterbacking” role. The lead agent staff will have a specific set of skills to serve as the backbone for the initiative in a particular place and coordinate the efforts of participating partners. The Miller Beach Arts and Creative District (MBACD) is the backbone support organization for Miller. MBACD provides oversight and logistical assistance and facilitates relationships and access to resources.
  19. 19. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 16 Miller has already begun taking action on the ideas coming out of the planning process. Here are just a few examples of what’s been happening and what’s in the works: Early Projects Harvest Festival Families enjoyed trick-or-treating on Lake Street while learning about programs and services available to Miller youth and children.
  20. 20. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 17 Bike Racks and Accessibility Enhancements Impromptu bike racks like this will soon be unnecessary. Community members mapped out locations for new bike racks and accessibility features such as wheelchair ramps. Welcome Wagon Important information about community services, organizations, and businesses will be distributed at various locations to welcome people to Miller.
  21. 21. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 18 Beautification Volunteers have begun cleaning up vacant lots along Lake Street. They’ll also use public art to beautify the area and create an inviting atmosphere. Financial Literacy Workshop Just in time for New Year’s resolutions, residents are invited to attend a financial literacy workshop to be hosted by a local bank. Miller Map A map of local nature areas and businesses will be distributed to tourists and residents alike to increase tourism and raise awareness of local assets. Block Clubs Residents throughout Miller, in the apartments, in Aetna, and in Glen Ryan will be provided with information and resources for forming block clubs.
  22. 22. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 19 Residents and community stakeholders formed Working Groups to develop goals and action plans for achieving seven themes identified in Miller’s vision: Area Context; Education, Youth and Child Programming; Environment and Ecotourism; Jobs and the Economy; Property and Blight; Safety and Code Enforcement; and Transportation and Infrastructure. For each theme, background information and data are provided to set the stage for the goals and strategies. The action plans identify Responsible Parties, who are the people, groups, and organizations committed to seeing the step or plan through to completion. New partners and interested community members can contact the Responsible Parties for more information on the goal. Supporting Partners are the people, groups and organizations who have committed to offering tangible support to the Responsible Party. New partners are invited to join in the work at any time and will be added to the plan as they’re identified. The success of goals or steps is determined by the measures indicated. Responsible parties will track these measures and report them back to the community. Not every action plan will begin right away, and goals can take anywhere from several months to several years to complete. The end of the plan includes information on how to get updates on Miller’s progress toward its goals or how to get involved. Residents and community members will continue revising the plan to reflect new opportunities and to address new challenges. Work Plan Vision without Action is merely a dream. Action without Vision just passes the time. Vision with Action can change the world. -Joel A. Barker
  23. 23. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 20 In the 1970s, residents formed the Miller Citizens Corporation (MCC) to combat white flight and to work together to create and maintain a desirable neighborhood. MCC has advocated against sand mining that would destroy the dunes and for enforcement of zoning and housing codes; organized community cleanups and social gatherings; and provided a space for residents to join together and make their voice heard. Outside of Miller, news stories mentioning the neighborhood aren’t hard to find. While some cover trouble or tragedy, many also highlight community events and opportunities. The Northwest Indiana Times and the Chicago Tribune share the most stories about or mentioning Miller, including a nod to the economic opportunities of expanding transit-oriented development, community events such as the Annual Miller Garden Club’s Fall Brats and Bulbs Sale or a bike ride from Miller to West Beach, and stories about Miller’s use of the arts to spur development. Area Context
  24. 24. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 21 Goal 1: Market the Miller neighborhood to increase positive press mentions to at least once quarterly and to increase tourism by 10% in 2016. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Launch Dragonfly NWI site. Area Context Action Group Miller Citizens Corps, Miller Business Association, Miller Beach Arts and Creative District, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder January 2016 Site operational 50 hits per month 2. Maintain Miller Spotlight blog and social media accounts. Community Builder Ongoing 2 blog posts per month 100 hits on blog per month 1 social media post per day 3. Invite travel journalists and bloggers from Chicago to a tour of the community in June. Area Context Action Group May 2016 50 travel journalists and bloggers invited 30 commit to attend 4. Host a Community Tour for travel journalists and bloggers. Area Context Action Group June 2016 25 people attend tour 4 positive news stories or blogs are written in 2016 10% increase in tourism in 2016
  25. 25. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 22 Goal 2: Host quarterly social gatherings with at least 100 attendees to update the Miller Quality of Life Plan and secure volunteers for new initiatives. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Secure 4 venues (one for each meeting of the year) Area Context Action Group MCC, MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder January 2016 Signed agreements with each space At least 1 space donated 3. Recruit volunteers and solicit donations Area Context Action Group MCC, MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder February 2016 10 people sign up to volunteer $500 raised 4. Promote events Area Context Action Group MCC, MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder February- November 2016 200 people RSVP 500 site hits/likes on social media 5. Host event Area Context Action Group MCC, MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder Quarterly 100 people attend 75% of volunteer needs are filled Goal 3: Build virtual and physical community bulletin boards in 2016. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Partner with local artist/craftsperson to build the physical board Area Context Action Group Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group, Community Builder, MCC, MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI, January 2016 Contract secured
  26. 26. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 23 Community Builder 2. Launch the virtual board via Dragonfly NWI Area Context Action Group Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group, Community Builder, MCC, MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder January 2016 Site operational 20 posts per month 100 hits per month 3. Choose a location for the board and secure permission for placement Area Context Action Group Education/ Youth and Child Programming Action Group January 2016 Spot secured 4. Approve the board design to be built Area Context Action Group Education/ Youth and Child Programming Action Group February-March 2016 Sign built 5. Host Ribbon Cutting Ceremony to promote the board’s grand opening Area Context Action Group April 2016 20 items posted to board per month 6. Monitor and maintain the board Area Context Action Group Beginning April 2016 Inappropriate content removed within 1 week Technical issues resolved within 30 days Physical damage repaired within 30 days
  27. 27. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 24 Almost a quarter of Miller’s population is under the age of 18. Miller includes several public schools operated by the Gary Community School Corporation, including Marquette Elementary, Banneker Elementary, and Wirt Emerson Visual and Performing Arts Academy. Wirt Emerson is a magnet school for grades 6-12. Its auditorium can seat 2500 people, and the school currently averages 100-200 people per event. Miller is also home to one charter school, KIPP Lead College Preparatory School. Miller hosted its first Miller Spotlight Harvest Festival in October 2015. Over 200 people attended the event, in which 22 educational institutions, nonprofits, and other providers distributed candy and information regarding their programs. 5.7% 6.9% 8.6% 6.2% 4.9% 55.8% 14.9% Population by Age Groups Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years Education and Youth and Child Programming
  28. 28. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 25 Goal 1: Increase play/event attendance at Wirt-Emerson Visual and Performing Arts Academy by 100% by November 2018. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Request updated event schedule from Wirt- Emerson. Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson, Dr. Adrian Richie, Mark Spencer. Every semester beginning November 2015 Receive a current schedule 2. Promote Wirt-Emerson events online Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson, Dr. Adrian Richie, Mark Spencer, community builder, MBACD Beginning 3 weeks before events 50 likes 10 shares 100 page hits 3. Create a phone tree to contact interested parties one-on-one about the Wirt-Emerson events Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson, Dr. Adrian Richie, Mark Spencer Beginning 2 weeks before event 100 one-on-one interactions 50 tickets sold 4. Create press packet for each Wirt-Emerson event Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson, Dr. Adrian Richie, Mark Spencer. Wirt-Emerson Visual Arts Majors 4 weeks before event Packs get created for each event 5. Contact press about each Wirt-Emerson event Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson 4 weeks before event 5 articles, radio promos, and/or TV announcements 6. Distribute Flyers across town Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson 2 weeks before event 50 flyers distributed across Lake and Porter County
  29. 29. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 26 7. Ensure that each Wirt- Emerson event is posted on the MBA sign and the Farmer’s Market sign Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson, Community Builder, MBA 2 weeks before event 80% of events posted 8. Document attendance and attendance trends Carolyn Mc Crady Lea Larson, Friends of Emerson, Dr. Adrian Richie, Mark Spencer, community builder, MBACD Ongoing beginning December 2015 Average 300 ticket sales per show in 2017-2018 school year Increase sales by 5% for five years thereafter Goal 2: Host annual Miller Spotlight Harvest Festival to increase enrollment of local educational institutions and programs for youth and children by 10% by 2019. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Secure funding for project Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Community Builder Jan-Oct. (Annually) $1000 raised 2. Fill out and submit Miller Spotlight Harvest Festival permit to the Outdoor Area Events Department Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Community Builder August (Annually) Permit turned in and accepted 3. Contact and confirm the closure of Lake St. with local businesses and secure their participation in the event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Miller Business Association (MBA), Miller Citizens Corps (MCC), Community Builder August-September (Annually) 70% of Lake St. businesses donate and/or distribute candy
  30. 30. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 27 4. Contact and secure the local educational institutions, non-for- profits and other volunteer venders participation in the event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group August-September (Annually) Add two new participants annually until there are at least 30 total 5. Create press packet for each year for this event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group August (Annually) Packs get created for each event 6. Contact press about the event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Community Builder September (Annually) 5 articles, radio promos, and/or TV announcements 7. Distribute Flyers across town Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Community Builder September- October (Annually) 50 flyers distributed across Lake and Porter County 8. Ensure that the event is posted on the MBA sign and the Farmer’s Market sign each year Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Community Builder, MBA October (Annually) Event posted 9. Secure 20 tables from Farmer’s Market (first 20 venders to signup get a table reserved) and ask any vender from 21+ to bring a table Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Farmer’s Market October (Annually) 20 tables provided 100% of venders have a table
  31. 31. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 28 10. Secure stage, sound equipment and volunteer acts Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group August-October (Annually) 6 hours of volunteer acts Correct equipment available for each act 11. Build haunted house with local youth at 444Grill Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group October (Annually) Haunted house complete 100 people go through house 12. Rent porta potties Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group October (Annually) 5 porta potties at event 13. Request police officers for event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Annually as soon as the permit is approved 2 police officers at event 14. Create and post Street closure signs, remind folks of the street closure via social media Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group September- October (Annually) 2 physical signs posted 200 views on social media 15. secure parking from JJs, Eric Spruth Ma and St. Mary’s Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group September- October (Annually) 50 parking spots donated 16. Secure a rain alternate venue Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group September- October (Annually) Signed agreement for use of indoor space 17. Host the Miller Spotlight Harvest Festival Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group October (Annually) 300 attendees by 2019 10% increase in enrollment of participating programs by 2019
  32. 32. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 29 Goal 3: Create a community space and maintain a local institution by opening the Wirt-Emerson pool to the public by May 2017. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Party Timeline Performance Measure 1. Secure partnership with Wirt-Emerson Pool Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group January 2017 Agreement with Wirt- Emerson Pool 2. Recruit volunteers Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning January 2017 10 volunteers in 2017 3. Recruit volunteer programmers Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning January 2017 5 programmers in 2017 4. Recruit participants Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning January 2017 50 participants in 2017 5. Research and write grants Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning January 2017 100% of funding needs met 6. Fix up and maintain Pool Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning April 2017 Maintenance needs addressed 7. Host a Grand Opening Party for the community Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group May 2017 200 attendees 30 attendees sign up for programs
  33. 33. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 30 8. Open pool to the public Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning May 2017 50 program participants in summer 2017 200 people use pool outside of programs in 2017 Usage increases 10% annually for 5 years Goal 4: Host Annual April Showcase beginning in 2017 to increase awareness of programs offered by all local schools. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Secure a venue Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group January (annually) Signed agreement with venue 2. Secure participation of local educational institutions Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group January (annually) At least one act from each public and charter school and one home school act 3. Create press packet for each year for this event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group March (annually) Packet created for each event 4.Secure stage, sound equipment and techs Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group February (Annually) Necessary equipment available
  34. 34. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 31 5. Contact press about the event Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group March (Annually) 5 articles, radio promos, and/or TV announcements 6. Distribute flyers Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group March (Annually) At least 2,000 flyers distributed 7. Host the April Showcase Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group April (Annually) 200 people attend first event Attendance increases to 300 by 2020 75% of attendees report increased awareness of school programs Goal 5: Hold quarterly meetings with representatives of each school (public and charter), parents/guardians, youth organizations, and the community to share concerns and develop unified advocacy strategy. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Create a virtual space for communication on youth Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group January 2016- May 2016 Forum launched 2. Invite schools, youth organizations, parents/guardians, and community to join virtual space Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Ongoing beginning January 2016 40 people join forum representing at least 8 different groups Posts are made at least twice a week
  35. 35. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 32 3. Host quarterly annual meetings Education/Youth and Child Programming Action Group Quarterly 20 attendees representing 5 different groups 1 group goal is achieved annually
  36. 36. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 33 Miller is nestled among nationally protected lands, including the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The local environment includes rare and endangered habitats and rich biodiversity in its dunes and wetlands. Miller’s entire shoreline is a public beach, making it the closest beach community to Chicago. It’s been a popular vacation destination since the early 20th century. Marquette Park, located on the lakefront, was the site of early aviation experiments pre-dating the Wright brothers. It contains two historic structures, one of which, the Aquatorium, now serves as a museum. The City of Gary received a major grant for improvements to Marquette Park in 2009, but Miller residents have concerns about funding for ongoing maintenance. Environment and Ecotourism
  37. 37. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 34 Goal 1: Develop a “Miller Map” to increase patronage of natural sites and businesses by 10% by December 2016. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Identify and map natural areas/ecotourism opportunities (trails, beaches, parks) and nearby businesses (restaurants, shops, etc.). Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Economy & Jobs Action Group, Miller Beach Arts & Creative District (MBACD), National Park Service (NPS) October 2015 Draft map 2. Hire skilled individual to complete artistic work and develop final product. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Economy & Jobs Action Group, Community Builder, MBACD, NPS Dec 2015 Draft v.2 map 3. Final draft review with all contributing parties and send to printing. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Economy & Jobs Action Group, Community Builder, MBACD, NPS March 2016 Approved printed map 4. Distribute to various Miller venues such as train station, businesses, etc. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Economy & Jobs Action Group, Community Builder, MBACD, NPS April 2016 500 maps picked up annually from distribution locations 5. Post map on internet and share link through social media. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Economy & Jobs Action Group, Community Builder, MBACD, NPS May 2016 1000 site hits annually; 10% increase in business Yelp reviews
  38. 38. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 35 Goal 2: Increase attendance of environment and ecotourism events by 10% by December 2016. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Review 2015 advertisement strategies and attendance records for ecotourism events. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group December 2015- January 2016 Report on event attendance and advertisement strategies 2. Collect environmental and ecotourism events, stewardship opportunities, volunteer opportunities, etc. on a monthly basis. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks and Recreation Department, National Park Service, Purdue University Calumet Urban Waters Ambassador, Save the Dunes Monthly beginning October 2015 25 events/opportunities collected per year 3. Distribute collected information monthly via Miller Spotlight Blog, Facebook, Nextdoor Neighbor App, Action Group email list, Nora Glenn email list, DragonflyNWI, and other media outlets as identified. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group, City of Gary Parks and Recreation Department, National Park Service, Purdue University Calumet Urban Waters Ambassador, Save the Dunes, Community Builder Monthly beginning October 2015 25% increase in advertisement of events 10% increase in event attendance
  39. 39. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 36 Goal 3: Install 10 new wayfinding and appropriate use signs by December 2017. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Identify areas where increased signage is most needed for way-finding or to promote appropriate area use. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service January 2017 Draft 10 or more locations for review 2. Seek approval for signage installation from property owners such as National Park Service or City of Gary. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group Miller Beach Arts & Creative District February-April 2017 Finalize 10 locations for approved signage 3. Hire a designer or work with City/National Park Service for design of signage. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department; Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service April-May 2017 Draft sign design(s) 4. Hire local company to create signage. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department; Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service June-July 2017 10 signs ready for installation 5. Install signage with guidance from property owner. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department; Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service August 2017 10 signs installed
  40. 40. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 37 Goal 4: Develop 6 environment and ecotourism themed advertisements for the Miller neighborhood to increase tourism by 10% in 2017. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Develop a series of messages for advertising Miller’s environmental assets. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department January 2017 Draft 6 messages 2. Hire skilled individual to complete artistic work and develop advertisements (such as posters, postcards, or flyers). Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Community Builder; Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service February 2017 Draft 6 advertisements 3. Review final draft with all contributing parties and send to printing. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Community Builder; Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service March 2017 Approved advertisements 4. Obtain approval and distribute to various venues such as the train station (both Miller and Chicago), businesses, and other locations. Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group City of Gary Parks & Recreation Department, Community Builder; Miller Beach Arts & Creative District; National Park Service April 2017 6 advertisements running through the recreation season (summer)
  41. 41. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 38 Businesses within Miller are primarily in retail or tourism. The neighborhood is more affluent than other areas in Gary and has weathered the City’s economic decline relatively well. The Lake Street corridor caters to neighborhood residents and is more walkable than other areas in the neighborhood. Approximately 18% of Miller’s labor force works outside of Indiana; many of these commuters travel to Chicago for work. An additional 3.9% of residents work from home. 35.1% 26.3% 19.8% 2.9% 15.9% Population by Occupation Management, business, science, and arts occupations Service occupations Sales and office occupations Natural resources, construction, and maintenance Production, transportation, and material moving Jobs and the Economy
  42. 42. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 39 3% 14.9% 0.6% 6.3% 6.6% 1.1% 7.7% 7.8% 25.1% 12.8% 6.4% 7.9% Construction Manufacturing Wholesale trade Retail trade Transportation and warehousing, and utilities Information Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing Professional, scientific, management, administrative and waste management services Educational services, and health care and social assistance Arts, entertainment, recreation, and accommodation and food services Other services, except public administration Public administration Population by Industry
  43. 43. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 40 Goal 1: Host 6 how-to workshops for businesses that result in 1 new business opening and 3 businesses remaining open or expanding by the end of 2017. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Survey businesses and prospective business owners regarding what skills or information they need. Economy & Jobs Action Group December 2015 70% return rate of surveys 2. Create schedule of informational or how-to events on business skills. Economy & Jobs Action Group January 2016 6 events scheduled 3. Recruit knowledgeable presenters for each topic. Economy & Jobs Action Group February - June 2016 1-3 presenters committed to each event 4. Market to businesses and prospective business owners. Economy & Jobs Action Group Month before each event 30 people attend each session 5. Host 6 events Economy & Jobs Action Group December 2017 80% of participants report that the topics are helpful to their business 80% of participants report that the networking opportunity was valuable 1 new business opens and remains open 3 businesses report remaining open or expanding
  44. 44. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 41 Goal 2: Create a coworking space for 8-12 entrepreneurs to launch or grow their business by the end of 2016. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Host meeting(s) of home-based businesses, entrepreneurs, and interested parties. Economy & Jobs Action Group January – March 2016 30 attendees 2. Determine number of people interested in coworking space and their space (sq. ft.) and equipment needs. Economy & Jobs Action Group March – April 2016 Report on interest and space requirements 3. Determine start-up costs (build-out, equipment, advertising, etc.). Economy & Jobs Action Group April – June 2016 Spreadsheet of costs 4. Determine operating costs (rent, utilities, maintenance, advertising, profit, etc.). Economy & Jobs Action Group June – July 2016 Spreadsheet of costs 5. Determine sources of income (grants, member fees, etc.). Economy & Jobs Action Group July – August 2016 Spreadsheet of income 6. Make “go/no go” decision on opening coworking space based on financial viability. Economy & Jobs Action Group September – October 2016 Decision made
  45. 45. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 42 7. Seek in-kind donations. Economy & Jobs Action Group MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI October 2016 – July 2017 10% of needed items are donated 8. Fundraise for start-up costs. Economy & Jobs Action Group October 2016 – July 2017 100% of start-up funds available 9. Negotiate contract for space. Miller Beach Arts and Creative District (MBACD) Economy & Jobs Action Group June 2017 Contract drawn 10. Advertise to local home-based businesses and entrepreneurs. Economy & Jobs Action Group MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI June 2017 8-12 entrepreneurs sign up to use coworking space for one month (free) 11. Launch space. Economy & Jobs Action Group MBA, MBACD, Dragonfly NWI September 2017 8-12 entrepreneurs sign one-year contract 12. Fundraise for operational expenses as needed. Economy & Jobs Action Group Ongoing 100% of operational expenses covered Goal 3: Host 4 Financial Literacy Workshops per year beginning in 2016, improving participants skill 20-30% Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partner Timeline Performance Measure 1. Secure workshop locations Economy & Jobs Action Group Quarterly 4 different locations confirmed 2. Contact banks to host each workshop Economy & Jobs Action Group January-February 2016 4 banks agree to host one workshop each
  46. 46. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 43 4. Promote to local citizens Economy & Jobs Action Group Dragonfly NWI Quarterly 40 people RSVP 5. Hold a financial literacy workshop Economy & Jobs Action Group Quarterly 30 people attend Participants’ skills improve 20% based on pre- and post-course tests Goal 4: Set up a food truck at the Lake St. Beach Snack Shop for the 2016 summer season to demonstrate the location’s redevelopment potential. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Propose idea to local food establishments with existing food trucks or interest in venturing into a food truck operation. Economy & Jobs Action Group Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group January 2016 Secure commitment from 3-5 venders 2. Research necessary permits. Economy & Jobs Action Group Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group February 2016 List of necessary permits and requirements 3. Request permits. Economy & Jobs Action Group Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group March 2016 All needed permits approved 4. Sign contracts with venders. Economy & Jobs Action Group Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group March 2016 Vender(s) on contract for 2016 season
  47. 47. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 44 4. Advertise online and in traditional media sources Economy & Jobs Action Group Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder April 2016 5 mentions in traditional media 100 likes on social media 5. Host Lake St. Beach Launch Party Economy & Jobs Action Group Environmental & Ecotourism Action Group, Dragonfly NWI, Community Builder Memorial Day 2016 100 people attend 6. Have a food truck out at Lake St. Beach on weekends Economy & Jobs Action Group May-September 2016 100 people patron food truck daily 10% in Beach parking lot usage
  48. 48. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 45 “Affordable housing” is safe, decent housing for which housing costs (mortgage payments, rent, property taxes, insurance, etc.) are less than 30% of a household’s income. 15.2% of homeowners and 22.2% of renters in Miller spend 30% or more of their household income on monthly housing costs, meaning that almost 40% of Miller households aren’t living in affordable housing. 12% of Miller properties are vacant for reasons not reported in the Census, which may indicate that these are abandoned properties. A volunteer task force has been working with the City of Gary for over 5 years to address blight. Miller residents have also used grassroots strategies to rehab properties in the past. For example, the City of Gary leased Miller residents the Aquatorium, a historic building within Marquette Park that had fallen into disrepair after becoming vacant. Residents used crowdfunding to rehab the building, which is now open as a museum. The City then used a grant to provide other improvements to Marquette Park as a whole. Almost half of Miller’s houses were built before 1960. When vacant properties are demolished without salvaging and recycling useable materials, unnecessary waste is created and historic wealth is lost. Rehabitate is an architectural salvage nonprofit working within Miller to support intentional deconstruction of vacant properties. Property and Blight
  49. 49. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 46 Note: No houses were reported as “Rented, not occupied” or “For migrant workers.” Units reported as “Other vacant” may be abandoned. 0.0% 5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% Built 2010 or later Built 2000 to 2009 Built 1990 to 1999 Built 1980 to 1989 Built 1970 to 1979 Built 1960 to 1969 Built 1950 to 1959 Built 1940 to 1949 Built 1939 or earlier Year Housing Structure Built 1.4% 1% 0.6% 1.2% 12% 44.4% 39.5% Housing Occupancy Status For rent For sale only Sold, not occupied For seasonal, recreational, or occasional use Other vacant Owner-occupied Renter-occupied 5.7% 13.9% 10.3% 7.5% 4.4% 1.7% 0.8% Value of Owner-Occupied Houses Less than $50,000 $50,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $149,999 $150,000 to $199,999 $200,000 to $299,999 $300,000 to $499,999 $500,000 or more
  50. 50. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 47 Goal 1: Survey and compile information on 100% of vacant properties by April 2016 to determine redevelopment potential. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Complete test area Survey of Lake street to streamline process Property and Blight Action Group October 1st 2015- November 1st 2015 Properties in selected area are 100% documented on a spreadsheet 2. Survey selected properties throughout the area determined by a set of guidelines that could make the most impact. Compile owner & tax information on focus properties Property and Blight Action Group October 15th – November 15st 2015 Selected properties are 100% documented on a spreadsheet 3. Send out letters to owners of selected properties Property and Blight Action Group November 15th – December 1st 2015 100% of properties on list given an initial contact letter 4. Review legal status and other possible constraints. Categorize properties based on redevelopment strategy and any legal hurdles. Property and Blight Action Group December 1st – 15th 2015 100% of focus properties reviewed and documented 5. Complete a baseline for measurement using the Gary Survey to determine percentages of vacancy and blight in the area. Property and Blight Action Group December 1st 2015 – December 15th 2015 A baseline with percentages is documented on a spreadsheet 6. Complete survey of remaining areas in Miller & compile information Property and Blight Action Group November 1st 2015 – March 15th 2016 An updated survey with 100% of properties in a spreadsheet completed
  51. 51. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 48 7. Review and prioritize properties in ranking system for future projects Property and Blight Action Group March 15th – April 15th 2016 Ranking list of properties completed Goal 2: Reduce vacant properties in Miller 20% by the end of 2018. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Use baseline from Goal 1 to establish quantity of properties needed to reach goal & rankings of properties for projects Property and Blight Action Group April 15th – 30th 2016 20% of vacant properties identified for rehab 2. Create a base budget for each project, and establish funding goals based on reaching the 20%. Get estimates from contractors and other parties required to complete projects Property and Blight Action Group May 1st – 15th 2016 Estimates submitted in written form. Base budget completed and submitted. Funding goal set. 3. Compile a list of possible funding and partnerships to complete projects Property and Blight Action Group May 1st – 15th 2016 List of at least 3 funding sources and 5 partnerships 4. Reach out to parties on the list and create marketing plan to get new investors, businesses and residents Property and Blight Action Group May 15th – 31st 2016 100% of listed parties contacted Marketing plan
  52. 52. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 49 5. Identify funding gaps and strategies for filling them Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group May 1st – July 15th 2016 Fundraising plan created Funding goals reached 6. Conduct lot cleanups and board-ups Property and Blight Action Group Rehabitate May 1st – July 1st 2016 100% of lots cleared and boarded as necessary 7. Select first round of properties/projects Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group May 1st – June 15th 2016 Properties chosen based on available funding 8. Bid out projects requiring outside contractors Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group May 15th – June 1st 2016 Bids accepted by Group 9. Begin Projects Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group June 1st 2016 Timeline submitted and projects started 10. Evaluate progress and adjust plans accordingly Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group August 1st – 15th 2016 Evaluation completed Changes approved by Group 11. Complete projects by deadline Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group October 15th 2015 100% of projects completed 12. Review process and update action plan based on lessons learned Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group October 15th – November 1st 2016 Updated plan approved by Group and community 13. Continue to fundraise, create action plans for additional properties, and carry out action plans Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group November 1st 2016 – December 1st 2018 Funding, approval and execution of projects 14. Reduce vacant properties in Miller by 20% Rehabitate Property and Blight Action Group December 1st 2018 Vacancy reduced by 20%
  53. 53. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 50 Goal 3: Compile at least 20 Miller visioning ideas from local universities and the community for a show in June 2016 to raise $10,000 in funding for projects in Miller. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Contact universities for information on student work. Get permission from students to use work. Property and Blight Action Group January 1-15 2016 Approval to use student work 2. Work with students to reissue work for event Property and Blight Action Group January 15-31 2016 Work is reproduced online and in print 3. Coordinate with Miller Arts and Creative District for gallery style event Property and Blight Action Group January 15-31 2016 Confirmed show with Miller Arts and Creative District 4. Solicit ideas from community for their own future of Miller Property and Blight Action Group February 1-March 1 2016 10 community groups, organizations and schools contacted 5. Collect submissions from community Property and Blight Action Group March 1-April 1 2016 10-20 ideas with images and narrative 6. Compile works into a gallery style show with student work Property and Blight Action Group April 1 – May 1 2016 Work is arranged and ready for show 7. Coordinate and advertise show Property and Blight Action Group May 1 – June 1 2016 Date & location for show confirmed Event advertised to community and 10 potential investors 8. Hold show of Miller visioning ideas Property and Blight Action Group June 1-June 14 2016 500 people attend opening $10,000 fundraising goal reached
  54. 54. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 51 9. Take work and create a virtual website Property and Blight Action Group June 14-October 1 2016 Website of work launched. Goal 4: Address 100% of beautification and security concerns at Lakeshore Dune Apartment complex by April 2018. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Trim back brush and maintain trim along public easement on Cypress Avenue across street from Apartment complex Property and Blight Action Group March 22, 2016 Brush is away from public easement Easement is 100% neatly trimmed along Cypress Avenue 2. Trim back enough brush and maintain trim south of 415 N. Lake Building to reveal existing landscaping Lakeshore Dunes Apartments March 24, 2016 Brush is away from south of 415 N. Lake Existing landscape 100% visible from Lake Street 3. Replace entrance and address signs with higher quality signs Lakeshore Dunes Apartments Property and Blight Action Group April 5, 2017 100% of entrance and address signs replaced with higher quality signs 4. Trim back Large trees on property Lakeshore Dunes Apartments April 8, 2017 50% of large trees on property trimmed back 5. Paint rusted window railings Lakeshore Dunes Apartments June 6, 2017 100% of rusted window railings painted 6. Market apartments Property and Blight Action Group June 8, 2017 Marketing provided (free to Lake Shore Dunes apartments) whenever possible. 7. Repair damaged cast iron fences Lakeshore Dunes Apartments March 23, 2018 100% of cast iron fences repaired
  55. 55. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 52 8. Resurface and restripe parking lot surfaces and repair parking lot security gates Lakeshore Dunes Apartments March 25, 2018 100% of parking lot surfaces and parking lot security gates repaired 9. Trim back large trees on property Lakeshore Dunes Apartments April 16, 2018 100% of large trees on property 100% of improvements to property and security completed
  56. 56. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 53 Miller’s lakefront and public beaches are a popular summer destination and rely on lifeguards hired by the City to ensure their safety. In 2015, a video was publicized apparently showing a lifeguard laying down on the job. The lifeguard was fired, but Miller is concerned about the potential of a negative reputation for its beach. Miller has the largest section of public beach on Lake Michigan in Indiana. Volunteers from the Miller Citizens Corp can be seen at the beach and Marquette Park at least twice a week picking up litter. Safety and Code Enforcement
  57. 57. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 54 Goal 1: Reduce illegal dumping sites within Miller by 75% by 2018. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Identify dumping sites Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, Miller Citizens Corps (MCC), Miller Business Association (MBA), Miller Beach Arts and Creative District (MBACD), Community Oriented Police office (COP) Annually January – April Baseline number of dumping sites established At least 5 major spots identified 2. Identify dumping site offenders (dumpers) Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Annually January - April At least 5 major offenders identified 3. Report offenders for criminal charges Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Ongoing At least 5 major offenders ticketed 4. Clean up dumping sites or contact specialists who do controlled cleanups if it is toxic waste Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Annually May - August At least 5 major spots cleaned
  58. 58. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 55 5. Contact city and post new sign about the fines involved with illegal dumping at each site Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Annually August 5 signs posted 6. Monitor cleaned sites Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Monthly Annual update on status of sites Known dumpers ticketed Goal 2: Form cooperative relationship by promoting community and police engagement activities with the 4 major apartment complexes within Miller (Park Shore Commons, Lakeshore Dunes, Ishiyama and Woodlake Village) to reduce the number of police calls by 20% by the end of 2020. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Set calendar for quarterly workshops with Commander Rice and residents of Park Shore Commons, Woodlake Village Apartments, Ishiyama, and Lakeshore Dunes Apartments Safety and Code Enforcement Committee Gary Police Dept. Commander Rice, Park Shore Commons Resident Liaison (Chrissy Link) Quarterly All parties agree to dates 2. Notify residents of quarterly workshops Safety and Code Enforcement Committee Gary Police Dept. Commander Rice, Park Shore Commons Resident Liaison (Chrissy Link) Quarterly 100% of residents receive notification
  59. 59. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 56 3.Organize a meeting space Safety and Code Enforcement Committee Gary Police Dept. Commander Rice, Park Shore Commons Resident Liaison (Chrissy Link) Quarterly Available meeting room with tables and chairs 4. Create meeting agenda Safety and Code Enforcement Committee Gary Police Dept. Commander Rice, Park Shore Commons Resident Liaison (Chrissy Link) Quarterly Agenda prepared 5. Hold meeting Safety and Code Enforcement Committee Gary Police Dept. Commander Rice, Park Shore Commons Resident Liaison (Chrissy Link) Quarterly Participation increases by 5% each meeting 20% of rental units attend one or more meetings by 2020 20% decrease in calls to police from apartments by 2020 Goal 3: Post 10 new anti-littering/code enforcement signs (with code enforcement phone number) in trouble spots by January 2017. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Identify 10 sites Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, Miller Citizens Corps (MCC), Miller Business Association (MBA), Miller January 2016- April 2016 At least 10 major spots are identified
  60. 60. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 57 Beach Arts and Creative District (MBACD), Community Oriented Police office (COP) 2. Request code enforcement signs from City Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office January 2016- April 2016 10 signs posted 3. Report offenders for criminal charges Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Ongoing Known offenders ticketed 4. Clean up sites or contact specialists who do controlled cleanups if it is toxic waste Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office May 2016-August 2016 At least 10 sites cleared of litter 5. Monitor sites Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Property and Blight Action Group, Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD, COP’s office Monthly after August 2016 Annual update on status of site Known offenders ticketed
  61. 61. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 58 Goal 4: Improve lifeguard accountability to reduce safety incidents on the beach by 10% in the 2016 season. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Meet with the Gary Parks Department and the Shoreline Committee Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, Miller Citizens Corps (MCC), Miller Business Association (MBA), Miller Beach Arts and Creative District (MBACD) January 2016 Goal accepted by Parks Dept. and Shoreline Committee 2. Recruit 5 former life guards to help implement this goal Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD January 2016- April 2016 5 volunteers 3. Provide Red Cross training, including CPR, to all lifeguards Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD January 2016- April 2016 100% of lifeguards pass training 4. Provide necessary equipment to lifeguards Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD January 2016- April 2016 100% of lifeguards have uniform, 100% of lifeguards have binoculars, 100% of lifeguards have emergency contact information 5.Provide training on lifeguard duties and expectations Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD April 2016- September 2016 100% of lifeguards participate in orientation training; 100% of
  62. 62. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 59 lifeguards have uniforms and binoculars at each shift, 100% of lifeguard breaks are covered through coordination with other lifeguards, 50% less litter on beach and shoreline 6. Monitor lifeguards and document their adherence to duties and expectations Safety and Code Enforcement Action Group Environment and Ecotourism Action Group, MCC, MBA, MBACD April 2016- September 2016 Weekly reports
  63. 63. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 60 In Miller, 8.8% of households don’t have a vehicle available. The neighborhood is served by GPTC (Gary Public Transportation Corp) bus #13, which runs a loop through the neighborhood once an hour from about 6am to 8pm weekdays and 10am to 6pm on Saturday. Miller is also connected regionally via a stop on the South Shore Line. According to the 2000 census, 6% of Miller residents use public transportation to commute to work. Public transportation is also used for recreational activities, as is biking. There are signs promoting safe bike use on Marquette Drive, and the only bike rack in Miller is located at the library. There are no protected bike lanes in Miller. There are currently four bike tours per year, attended by about 15 riders. There’s also one walking tour every year, attended by about 8 people. The Chanute Trail is a paved trail in Marquette Park. The Marquette Trail follows an abandoned rail line through the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. Each trail has about 15 users per day. A map is available highlighting ten miles of safe bicycle routes. Transportation and Infrastructure
  64. 64. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 61 72.5% 9.3% 18.2% Place of Work Worked in county of residence Worked outside county of residence Worked outside state of residence 79.1% 10.5% 2.0% 3.3% 1.2% 3.9% Mode of Transportation to Work Car, truck, or van - drove alone Car, truck, or van - carpooled Public transportation Walked Taxicab, motorcycle, bicycle, or other Worked at home
  65. 65. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 62 Goal 1: Identify and engage at least ten (10) key regional partners involved in development, improvements and funding of transportation infrastructure to advocate for and find means to achieve our short and long term goals beginning 10/31/2015. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Identify at least ten key partners and develop a listing of each partner's standing meeting dates (e.g., NIRPC committees, RDA, Accessibility Organizations, City of Gary Planning and other ) Subcommittee of Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 10/31/2015 List of at least ten key partners noting areas of mutual interest & Calendar of regular meetings and upcoming special meetings 2. Recruit volunteers to review upcoming meeting agendas of key partners, attend meetings, advocate and report back to the Committee Subcommittee of Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 12/31/2015 Network of at least one volunteer for every key partner 3. Develop marketing plan to notify Miller residents of relevant meetings and to mobilize residents for advocacy as needed Subcommittee of Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 12/31/2015 Marketing plan complete 120 residents attend relevant meetings 4. Facilitate meeting between key partners, the committee and at least one interested citizen to discuss and brainstorm viable pathways to achieve our goals Subcommittee of Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group First meeting by 1/31/2016; bimonthly meetings thereafter 100% of key partners participate in meeting 50% of partners commit to steps from Miller Collective Impact Plan
  66. 66. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 63 Goal 2: Increase number of residents biking, rolling and walking in Miller 500% by 2025. Action Steps Responsible Party Supporting partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Market with existing regional or national trails Internet sites Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group January 1, 2016 – December 31, 2026 Marketing increases biking and walking in Miller by 10% each year 2. Make a logo design to brand the neighborhood as ideal for all types of transport and exploration Cullen Ben-Daniel February 28,2016 Logo 3. Install bike racks on Lake Street near businesses North and South of rail tracks Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 18th Street Brewery April 15, 2016 At least 3 new bike racks installed 4. Host more bicycle/walking tours Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Cycle Miller Beach, Kim Swift of National Park Service January 1, 2016 through December 31, 2025 26 rides per year 6 walk tours per year Attendance increases by 10% every year 5. Request that City place signs on public easements for walking trails at the Chanute Trail and the Marquette Trailheads on Grand, Montgomery, Douglas Center and County Line Road. Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group May 3, 2017 Two signs mark each walking trail destination 50% increase in foot traffic within one year
  67. 67. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 64 6. Request reflective painted bike lanes and/or signage leading to the Chanute Trail and the Marquette Trailheads on Grand, Montgomery and County Line Road Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group May 3, 2017 Two signs and two bike lanes marking each bike trail destination 50% increase in bike traffic within one year 7. Request reflective bike striping and signage on Lake Street Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group May 15, 2017 2.5 miles of reflective bike striping and signage on Lake Street 50% increase in biking on Lake Street 8. Establish a “Build-A- Bike” type program at the Farmers Market or regular storefront. Ken Parr Mandi Renslow and Cycle Miller Beach May 15, 2018 One person per week will use program to increase by 50% each year 9. Request striping and/or signage promoting safe bike routes through neighborhoods Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group May 29, 2018 Increase striping and/or signage from one (1) existing bike route to five (5) more bike routes. 10. Advocate for bicycling and walking safety measure in all new Miller roadway projects Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group November, 25, 2018 100% of new roadways built to be safe and convenient for bicycling and walking 11. Map trails and bicycle safe routes Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Cycle Miller Beach October 20, 2020 , Map 100 miles of safe biking routes 12. Advocate for protected bike lanes and wider sidewalks on Lake Street, Grand Blvd, and Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group November 3, 2020 At least 50% length of Lake Street, Grand Blvd., and Oak Avenue has protected bike lanes and
  68. 68. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 65 Oak Avenue wider sidewalks (totaling 3.5 miles) 13. Advocate for protected bike lanes and wider sidewalks on Lake Street, Grand Blvd, and Oak Avenue Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group May 04, 2025 100% length of Lake Street, Grand Blvd., and Oak Avenue has protected bike lanes and wider sidewalks plus 100% length (4 miles) from Lake Street train station to Gary Metro train station. Goal 3: Bike Share and Car Share programs will increase from zero users to a combined twenty (20) users per day by 2019. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Create DIY Bike Share Program Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 7/30/2016 4 bikes available for 16 users per month A. Acquire bikes via donation, salvage, or second-hand purchase Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 5/15/2016 4 bikes acquired B. Refurbish and tune-up bikes, paint frames all the same color, and affix bike share rules Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 7/15/2016 100% of bikes refurbished
  69. 69. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 66 C. Conduct assessment to determine bike placement locations Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 7/15/2016 2 locations identified as high need/high use areas D. Place bikes and lock with combination locks that all have the same combination Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 7/30/2016 100% of bikes placed and locked E. Redistribute bikes as needed Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Ongoing Bicycles are available on demand to users at least 75% of the time. F. Collect bike share usage data Subcommittee of the Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Ongoing Monthly Report 2. Evaluate DIY program; if there’s sufficient interest in a bike share, research what model is appropriate for Miller and develop a plan for approaching a transportation agency or company to develop a bike sharing system Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 2018 3. Create DIY Car Share Program: A car co-op where driver members collectively purchase, insure and maintain a vehicle Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 6/1/2017 6 users for 2 cars A. Assemble interested residents to discuss car co-op structure and sign agreement Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 4/1/2017 6 participants
  70. 70. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 67 B. Develop membership fees to collectively purchase car and pay for insurance and upkeep Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 6/1/2017 Purchase of car and insurance Maintenance account C. Set up a Google calendar for members only to reserve the car Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 6/1/2017 95% of users report that car reservation is easy, calendar is accurate D. Collect car share usage data Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Ongoing Quarterly Report 4. Evaluate official car-sharing program; if there’s sufficient interest in a car share, research what model is appropriate for Miller and develop a plan for approaching a company to develop a car sharing system Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 2019 Goal 4: Provide shuttle bus services to 500 Miller residents on weekends and for special events by summer 2016 and increase numbers by 10% each year until the beginning of 2018. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Identify prioritized needs and key stakeholders and partners Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 12/15/2015 5 priorities identified 5 partners identified 2. Hold meetings with key partners to identify mutual interests, determine shuttle goals, and agree on next steps Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 2/15/2016 10 meetings with at least 5 potential partners At least 3 partners commit to next steps
  71. 71. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 68 3. Facilitate a community meeting to gather input on needs, desires and goals (e.g. usage, routes, frequency, special events, etc.) Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group 3/15/2016 100 residents attend 75% indicate desire for shuttle service 25% commit to next steps 2 routes identified 5 special events identified 4. Initiate pilot program to track shuttle bus usage Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Summer – Fall 2016 2 buses on 2 routes 20 riders per route per bus At least 500 riders per weekend 75% of riders indicate satisfaction with service Goal 5: Develop a website tracking physical obstacles to accessibility in Miller and improve the 10 public sites identified as least accessible by 2020. Action Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Evaluate and rate public infrastructure and buildings for physical obstacles to accessibility Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group September 2016 Report documenting assessment findings 2. Build a website to report on building accessibility ratings Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group December 2016 75% of public and commercial buildings listed 100 site hits per year 3. Advocate for the City to update existing accessibility infrastructure Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group October 2017 10 least accessible sites are improved to “highly accessible”
  72. 72. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 69 4. Monitor new infrastructure projects for compliance with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act and other accessibility laws Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Ongoing 100% of new infrastructure meets legal requirements for accessibility 5. Track accessibility of new projects being developed by private and public sectors on website Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group By 10/2020 75% of local projects listed 100 site hits per year Goal 6: Make all Miller Spotlight web content accessible by 2019. Actions Steps Responsible Party Supporting Partners Timeline Performance Measure 1. Develop accessibility policy for Miller Spotlight web content and post to Miller website Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group October 2017 Policy posted 2. Convert existing web content to accessible format Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group October 2018 100% of existing content is in accessible format 3. Test pages for ease of use Transportation and Infrastructure Action Group Annually 100% of web content is accessible
  73. 73. Miller Collective Impact Plan | Page 70 The Miller Collective Impact Plan was presented in a community presentation on November 14, 2015, at Wirt- Emerson High School. Action Group members shared updates on their partnerships and activities so far, and residents and stakeholders were invited to get involved. Implementation is ongoing, and new ideas and strategies will be added to the Plan as they’re identified by Miller. Next Steps To learn more or get involved: millerspotlight@gmail.com www.legacyfdn.org/neighborhoodspotlight/miller www.millerspotlight.blogspot.com www.facebook.com/millerspotlight

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