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On tour 2008
	 80th
season, 8th
summer tour
aunton
hespiansT
By
Richard Brinsley
Sheridan
The RivalsThe Rivals
Director
...
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

 
 
 ...
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Taunton Thespians is a Registered Charity, Number 800217
For the Benefit of the People of Somerſet
The Taunton Theſpians...
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CALVERTSOF TAUNTON
FURNISHING SPECIALISTS
for
Quality and Service
94-108 STATION ROAD,TAUNTON
Telephone: (01823) 335823
...
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Director’s Notes
When I was invited to be the director of the 2008
Thespians summer tour production, I found myself
face...
6
7
Richard Brinsley Sheridan ~
about our Author
Early life
R.B. Sheridan was born in Dublin on October 30, 1751
at 12 Dorse...
8
Express Print ad
9
Frank Bond Community Centre
“Won't you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you”
RBS, on meeting his futur...
10
Muchelney Abbey
“Do thou snatch treasures from my lips, and I'll take kingdoms back
from thine.”
Our third abbey of the...
11
back
ed.
ppoÇed
eart-
ccord-
nd
h
bey,
hin
ome
ent
was
d 2
nd 30
ent
e - it also marks the time,
d a great deal about g...
12
The Characters & Players
Fag by Mr. Andrew Miller
Thomas by Mr. Jonny Leach
Lydia Languish by Miss Abi Vickery
Lucy by ...
13
Backſtage
Director .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  Peter Norbury
Aſſistan...
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The Phoebe Rees Awards
Founded by Phoebe Rees and run by the Somerſet Fellowſhip
of Drama, the competition is open to a...
15
The sheer unpredictability of touring is what I love. Dancing in the rain on uneven ground in high
heels or sweltering ...
16
I have always enjoyed drama,
but since completing my
drama degree in 2006, I have had
little chance to pursue my pas-
s...
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I’ve been involved in
Thespian shows at the
Brewhouse many times, ei-
ther on stage or working be-
hind the scenes, but...
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Many Thanks to Jack Coulthard
For the loan of his paintings for our production of
“Suddenly At Home”
Telephone – 01823 ...
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Directed by Sylvia Fellgett, at The Brewhouse Theatre & Arts Centre, Taunton
From Tuesday November 4th until Saturday N...
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Tilly of Bloomsbury
The Professor’s Love Story
Ambrose Applejohn’s Adventure
The Admirable Crichton
The Rising Generati...
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Bequest to the Nation
The Lion in Winter
The Rivals
Toad of Toad Hall	
Move Over Mrs Markham
Hay Fever
Caesar and Cleop...
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Taunton Thespians are
President - John Meikle
Vice Presidents - Margaret Way,Thelma Wander, Ron Roberts
Honorary Member...
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s
d
n
s
Forthcoming Auditions
Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads
Auditions
Are to be held on Monday 28 and Tuesday 29 July. P...
24
Taunton’s premier
independent estate agents
If you are thinking of buying or ſelling in the area, contact us
firſt
Esta...
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Programme for Taunton Thespians' production of The Rivals

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The Rivals was Thespians' Summer Tour in 2008, and sourcing period cartoons for the cover/posters and backgrounds was huge fun. As was playing with ligatures.

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Programme for Taunton Thespians' production of The Rivals

  1. 1. 1 On tour 2008 80th season, 8th summer tour aunton hespiansT By Richard Brinsley Sheridan The RivalsThe Rivals Director Peter Norbury Souvenir programme Souvenir programme
  2. 2. 2                                                      
  3. 3. 3 Taunton Thespians is a Registered Charity, Number 800217 For the Benefit of the People of Somerſet The Taunton Theſpians preſent A COMEDY in five acts called The Rivals By Mr Richard Brinſley Sheridan This ſame Play to be performed at ſundry Hiſtoric and Romantick Outdoor venues During the Month of June 2008
  4. 4. 4 CALVERTSOF TAUNTON FURNISHING SPECIALISTS for Quality and Service 94-108 STATION ROAD,TAUNTON Telephone: (01823) 335823 www.calvertsfurniture.co.uk GREAT DEALS ON CAR AND VAN HIRE UP TO 35 CWT SHORT OR LONG TERM HIRE WEEKEND RATES 01823 283344 OPEN 7.30am – 6pm, MONDAY to SATURDAY 9 Beaufort Road,Taunton,TA1 1BN. MasterCard or VISA accepted mvr have supplied Taunton Thespians with their Tour minibus and wish The Rivals every success.
  5. 5. 5 Director’s Notes When I was invited to be the director of the 2008 Thespians summer tour production, I found myself faced with the task of drawing up a short-list of three plays from which a final selection would be made.The requirement was for an accessible, broadly entertain- ing, literary comedy, offering a strong set of both male and female characters, and capable of being realised with minimal staging at a variety of outdoor locations. Now that it has reached an age when memory is not always its most constant companion, my mind went blank. Having spent the last twenty or so years working pre- dominantly (though not exclusively) with children of school age and Youth Theatre groups, I had inhabited a world of devising, improvising and writing original work for performance, deviating along the way to direct three musical shows, four pantomimes and a handful of dramatic productions for a variety of theatre and drama groups. Choosing something for an outdoor tour was an entirely new challenge. The decision that I needed some assistance took me to Waterstones, a place I am incapable of leaving empty- handed, and on this occasion my usual package of “three for two” novels was supplemented by a copy of the Oxford Book of Plays. As I waded through this splendid A-Z compendium, I felt rather as I do whenever I go into somewhere like Currys or PC World. With so much to choose from, what to choose? How long the alphabet can seem when you have to go from one end to the other! By the time I had reached the letter S, only one selection had suggested itself and I was wilting.Then I opened the page on Sheridan, and The Rivals hit me right between the eyes. It met all the aforementioned parameters, and what’s more, it was something I really fancied doing. If only I had thought of it in the first place! Following auditions, a strong cast of actors was assem- bled to begin the work of realising the equally strong cast of characters who populate what was described by Samuel Johnson as “one of the two best comedies of the age”. And what a collection of characters has descended on the city of Bath! Jack Absolute is a dashing young army officer, seeking the hand of the beautiful but capri- cious young Lydia, whose affections are also sought by both the buffoonish Bob Acres, ‘up from the country’ to improve himself, and the slightly seedy Irish adventurer, Sir Lucius O’Trigger. Hence, the rivals. To this mix, add Lydia’s cousin, the noble but put-upon Julia, her maddeningly sensitive and jealous suitor, Faulkland, Jack’s cantankerous and gouty father, Sir Anthony, and one of the greatest creations in the history of comedy, the linguistically tortured Mrs. Malaprop, and the cake is ready to bake! With the conniving servants Fag and Lucy to muddy the waters,Thomas the coach- man and a crew of eighteenth century removal men, this tale of mistaken identity, misplaced passion and the ups and downs of love, crackles with wit and laughter over two hundred years after it was written. And it has been fun, as much fun as I can remember deriving from ‘the process’. It has been a smooth voyage on a happy ship, and I am confident that the exuberance of those of us fortunate enough to have been involved in creating the performance you are about to witness will transmit itself to those of you who have had the perspi- cacity to be in attendance. Our production is before you. As they say in another place, I commend it to the house. Peter Norbury
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  7. 7. 7 Richard Brinsley Sheridan ~ about our Author Early life R.B. Sheridan was born in Dublin on October 30, 1751 at 12 Dorset Street, a fashionable street in the late eight- eenth century. (Fellow playwright Seán O’Casey was born in Dorset Street 130 years later.) He was baptized on November 4, 1751, his father Thomas Sheridan be- ing an actor-manager who managed the Theatre Royal, Dublin for a time, and his mother, Frances Sheridan, a writer (most famous for her novel The Memoirs of Sid- ney Biddulph). She died when her son was fifteen.The Sheridans’ eldest child,Thomas, died in 1750, the year when their second son, Charles Francis (d. 1806), was born. He later carried on an affair with Henrietta Spen- cer, Countess of Bessborough. Works The Rivals (first acted 17 January 1775) St Patrick’s Day (first acted 2 May 1775) The Duenna (first acted 21 November 1775) A Trip to Scarborough (first acted 24 February 1777) The School for Scandal (first acted 8 May 1777) The Camp (first acted 15 October 1778) The Critic (first acted 30 October 1779) The Glorious First of June (first acted 2 July 1794) Pizarro (first acted 24 May 1799) He also wrote a selection of poems, and political speech- es for his time in parliament. Family and career Richard was educated at Harrow School, and was to study law. However, his highly romantic elopement with Elizabeth Linley (1754-1792; daughter of Tho- mas Linley), and their subsequent marriage on 13 April 1773 at St Marylebone Parish Church, put paid to such hopes; they had a son,Thomas (1775-1817). Richard’s second marriage was to Esther Jane Ogle; they also had a son, Charles Brinsley Sheridan (died 1843). When Richard returned to London, he began writ- ing for the stage. His first play, The Rivals, produced at Covent Garden in 1775, was a failure on its first night. Sheridan cast a more capable actor for the role of the comic Irishman for its second performance, and it was a smash which immediately established the young play- wright’s reputation. It has gone on to become a standard of English literature. Having quickly made his name and fortune, Sheridan bought a share in Drury Lane. His most famous play The School for Scandal (1777) is considered one of the greatest comedies of manners in English. It was followed by The Critic (1779), an updating of the satirical Restoration play The Rehearsal, which received a memorable revival (performed with Oedipus in a single evening) star- ring Laurence Olivier at the Old Vic Theatre in 1946. Sheridan was plagued by writer’s block and managed only a limited output during his lifetime. He was the grandfather of society beauty and author Caroline Norton, and the great-grandfather of Lord Dufferin, third Governor General of Canada and eighth Viceroy of India.The famous ghost story writer Sheridan le Fanu was his great-nephew. Richard Brinsley Sheridan. (2008, May 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 20:23, June 10, 2008
  8. 8. 8 Express Print ad
  9. 9. 9 Frank Bond Community Centre “Won't you come into the garden? I would like my roses to see you” RBS, on meeting his future wife The Frank Bond Centre was named after its benefaÀor, a local builder by the name of Frank Bond. He was a private man, with two unuÇual hobbies: he colleÀed theatre organs and around his garden he had numerous aviar- ies houÉng exotic birds. He opened his garden once a year to the general public and all money raiÇed went to charity. On his death he left his houÇe and garden (now the Centre) and land to the community. The land was uÇed for development - Çome was uÇed for houÉng and Çome was provided for the St Margaret's HoÇpice to be built. The Centre was eÌabliÈed in 1983, after alterations to provide accommodation for reÉdent caretakers upÌairs and to open up the ground Åoor area for aÀivities. There is a main room, with a hatch to kitchen and opening into the conÇervatory. In addition there is a Çmaller Çeparate room. A lavatory and oÂce block were alÇo added. The Frank Bond TruÌ Limited is a charity and limited company which conÉÌs of eight TruÌees who manage the Centre. The Centre is open to people who have retired and are Çeeking aÀivity in a local Çetting. We’re delighted to be playing this new venue (well, new to us) which is Ço cloÇe to our baÇe in Taunton, and hope it will be the Ìart of a fruitful relationÈip. Cleeve Abbey “There is not a passion so strongly rooted in the human heart as envy.” The Abbey was founded in the late 12th century by the Norman baron William de Roumare. The ÄrÌ monks, twelve in all led by Abbot Ralph, arrived in 1198 at this place which they knew as Vallis Florida – the Valley of Flowers. Cleeve was never a rich houÇe and its buildings took longer to complete than Çome. This probably pleaÇed the abbots of Forde and Neath, who raiÇed the mediaeval equivalent of planning objeÀions about the foundation of another abbey Ço cloÇe to theirs. Like many abbeys it experienced great diÂculties in the years following the Black Death (1384), when moÌ of its eÌates were let to tenants and the value of rents fell. By 1450 however, the poÉtion had improved ÇuÂciently to allow the Abbot, David Juyner, to re-build the refeÀory and his own lodgings on an impreËive Çcale. DeÇpite this recovery the abbey’s income was Ìill too low to Çave it from diËolution with the other Çmall monaÌeries in 1536, although Cleeve was one of the more fortunate. It Çurvived almoÌ intaÀ, with the exception of the church, and was uÇed as a manor houÇe for Çome time before declining into uÇe as ag- ricultural buildings. This did mean that all the buildings were kept weath- erproof, however, leading to the Çurvival of Çome Ìunning architeÀural and decorative features. Its 17 monks were deÇcribed as ‘prieÌs of honeÌ life, who keep great hoÇpitality’, and locally their departure was much regretted. Fyne Court “Certainly nothing is unnatural that is not physically impossible.” Once owned by the CroËe family, Fyne Court is now home to the Somer- Çet Wildlife TruÌ, being leaÇed from the National TruÌ. In 1894 the main hall burnt down, leaving the buildings you can Çee today. The owner in the early nineteenth century, Andrew CroËe, was known to locals as “Wizard” CroËe, whoÇe houÇe was beÌ avoided (eÇpecially after dark). He was an amateur ÇcientiÌ with a particular intereÌ in eleÀricity. In heavy Ìorms, his equipment would cauÇe the windows of his laboratory to be brilliantly lit by continual ÅaÈes, and loud bangs would be heard coming from the houÇe! Hence his other title, “The Thunder and Lightning Man”. In one experiment, deÉgned to create Élicate cryÌals, he paËed eleÀricity through a Çolution of Åint and potaËium carbonate, dropped onto a piece of volcanic Ìone that had been Çaturated with hydrochloric acid. After two weeks he was Èocked to Änd not cryÌals, but Çmall mites! When news of this got out he was falÇely accuÇed of claiming to have created life. His friends included the poet Robert Southey, Byron’s daughter Lady Ada Lovelace, Charles Babbage (the father of computers) and Sir Humphrey Davy (inventor of the miner’s lamp). His Çon, John, was very friendly with Lady Ada Lovelace. When Èe died Èe left him Byron’s Égnet ring and lock of hair, which are Ìill in his family’s poËeËion. John alÇo had a portion of Ada’s life inÇurance, in return for which he agreed to deÌroy all Ada’s letters to him.
  10. 10. 10 Muchelney Abbey “Do thou snatch treasures from my lips, and I'll take kingdoms back from thine.” Our third abbey of the fortnight, Muchelney, has the beÌ legend attached. This tells of a man who fell in love with the daughter of a knight. He oppoÇed their union and therefore forbade them from marrying. The man was heart- broken and became a monk, eventually moving to Muchelney where, accord- ing to Çome verÉons of the tale, he became Prior. To his ÇurpriÇe, he found that his former Çweetheart had become a nun there. They Ìill loved each other, Ço renewed their relationÈip and planned to elope together. Sadly, they were betrayed. The prior was Çent away to a diÌant abbey, to repent his Éns. Being a leÇs egalitarian period of our hiÌory, the nun was walled up and left to die in a Çecret paËage Çomewhere within the abbey. This is, of courÇe, romantic nonÇenÇe, probably dreamt up by a ViÀorian, whoÇe imagination had been inÅamed by Çeeing Çome table legs without any covering. Muchelney, once a verdant iÊand in the Levels and a quiet haven for monks and recluÇes, is an excellent venue, with a wall to help aÀors projeÀ and the old foundations providing a Ìepped auditorium. In the DomeÇday Çurvey in 1086, it was Ìated that: The Church of St. Peter of Micelenye has 4 carucates of land which never paid geld in theÇe iÊands. There is demeÇne and 2 ploughs and 1 arpent of vineyard. There are 4 Çerfs and 18 bordars with 2 ploughs. There are 1 riding horÇe and 21 beaÌs and 6 Çwine and 30 Èe-goats. There are two ÄÈeries paying 600 ells, and 25 acres of meadow and 12 acres of woodland and 100 acres of paÌure. The ancient ruins vibrate with life and one can imagine it all Ço clearly. Glastonbury Abbey “I open with a clock striking, to beget an awful attention in the audience - it al which is four o clock in the morning, and saves a description of the rising sun, and a gre ing the eastern hemisphere.” Quite poËibly the oldeÌ of our venues, if you believe the legend – JoÇeph of Arimathea coming CruciÄxion and planting the thorn tree. And legends are Çomething GlaÌonbury is drenched in. when the legends of myÌical Avalon began, GlaÌonbury, a Çmall town in SomerÇet, cradled in a Çouth of England, was thought to have been a Éte for pre-ChriÌian worÈip. Three Ìone Abbey laÌ, have Ìood on this Éte over the centuries; and before that the 'Old Church' on the Éte of th el and St David’s Church to the eaÌ of this. There is even a Çmall amount of evidence of Roman plus evidence of Bronze and Iron Age occupations in and around GlaÌonbury. We are performin main arches of the church, and being upÌaged by the Éte where the bones of Arthur and Guinev HIC IACET SEPULTUS INCLITUS REX ARTURIUS IN INSULA AVALONIA was inÇcrib found Çeven feet underground with the bones in a Ìone coÂn, although that Éte and the croÇs ar juÌ after The Anarchy – more famous now becauÇe of Brother Cadfael than the civil war betwe rule of law and they wonder how convenient the diÇcovery was. Another, more modern myth t Global warming and the riÇe in Çea level might be about to reveal the truth or oth Lovibonds Farm, Burrowbridge “Fertilizer does no good in a heap, but a little spread around works miracles all over.” This venue is a beautiful open Äeld, giving the aÀors views out to Burrow Mump. According to the SomerÇet HiÌoric Environment Record, this is a probable Norman motte Çcarped from a natural conical hill at the junÀion of two rivers on the levels. A terraced track Çpirals up to it, Ìopping Èort of the berm, and the aÇcent would probably have been completed by Ìeps. An un- ÄniÈed church Ìands on the Çummit. A hollow path leads up to the church from the village. The earlieÌ reference is in 934 when the hill was given to Athelney Abbey under the name of Toteyate. In 1480 it was known as ‘Myghell-borough’. The ‘Free Chapel of St. Michael’ is ÄrÌ referred to di- reÀly in 1548, and was extant in 1633, but in 1645 was the Çcene of a three- day Ìand by RoyaliÌ troops. The next reference in 1663 is for its repair and rebuilding, which was apparently begun c.1724 but never ÄniÈed, and by 1793 a new church was ÇubÇcribed for with contributors including Pitt the Younger and Admiral Hood. The building again was never completed. A Çunken paËageway and a deep Çquare pit which may have been a medi- eval well were alÇo partly excavated. The hill was given to the National TruÌ as a war memorial in 1946.
  11. 11. 11 back ed. ppoÇed eart- ccord- nd h bey, hin ome ent was d 2 nd 30 ent e - it also marks the time, d a great deal about gild- coming to Britain after the ched in. In the beginning, led in a cluÌer of hills in the Abbeys, each large than the te of the current Lady Chap- Roman civiliÇation on this, erforming between the two d Guinevere were enÈrined. s inÇcribed on the lead croÇs croÇs are both now loÌ. Cynical hiÌorians look at the politics of the time, r between Stephen and Matilda – with Henry II trying to re-eÌabliÈ the myth tells of the exiÌence of a zodiac in the earthworks around the area. th or otherwiÇe in that tale. The Cleve Hotel & Country Club “Modesty is a quality in a lover more praised by the women than liked.” This was deÉgned by Alfred WaterhouÇe in the contemporary Ìyle of 1866 for JoÇeph Hoyland Fox and his wife Mariana. Originally juÌ called “The Cleve”, it was the Çecond of the three houÇes of the Fox family in Wellington, after the original Tonedale HouÇe. (The Foxes, being Quak- ers, didn’t juÌ think of their own comforts, but of thoÇe leÇs fortunate than themÇelves. It’s worth knowing that Çugar waÇn’t Çerved to gueÌs at Tonedale, as it was a produÀ of the Êave trade.) When built, there were no bathrooms at The Cleve, although a hip bath was provided for every bedroom. This is not a Étuation gueÌs now have to worry about; not only are all rooms en Çuite, but there’s a heated indoor Çwimming pool and ÄtneÇs Çuite they can uÇe too! We’re performing in the gardens, which were deÉgned by JoÇeph Fox, and where he Çpent much of his time. (Information from “More than Two Hundred Years, Wellington and the Foxes” by John Hagen & Michael P. Fox, pub. Wellington MuÇeum & Local HiÌory Society). Taunton Castle “Remember that when you meet your antagonist, to do every- thing in a mild agreeable manner. Let your courage be keen, but, at the same time, as polished as your sword.” This wonderful building, our Änal Tour venue, only Ìands today thanks to the eÁorts of the local Archaeological Society, who pur- chaÇed it in 1874 to Çave it from demolition. It’s now undergoing a £6.5m refurbiÈment and renovation projeÀ, and we are lucky to be able to play here as uÇual. The baking heat of the afternoon of the 1Ì of July 2006 was glorious for the T-Èirted audience, not Ço for the caÌ in full ViÀorian rig. This contraÌed Èarply with the pouring rain that the 2007 caÌ endured for two Çoggy weeks. The caÌle has a reputation of being haunted, particularly the Great Hall, as this is where Judge JeÁreys tried many of the rebels of 1685. The echoes of marching feet are Çaid to have been heard in the caÌle corridors, explained as the Çound of James’s Çoldiers bringing priÇoners to trial. On the caÌle landing a man in period dreÇs and wig, carrying a Çword and piÌol has been Çeen, although there is no indication as to who he may be. The caÌle has alÇo been the Çcene for poltergeiÌ aÀivity and the ghoÌ of a fair-haired woman in 17th century coÌume. No ghoÌs or ghouls in The Rivals, but you may juÌ hear the far-oÁ clank of Çwords during duels held long ago loÌ in the miÌs of time...
  12. 12. 12 The Characters & Players Fag by Mr. Andrew Miller Thomas by Mr. Jonny Leach Lydia Languish by Miss Abi Vickery Lucy by Mrs. Nikki Court Julia by Miss Hollie Cooper Mrs. Malaprop by Mrs. Jane Edwards Sir Anthony Absolute by Mr. Ray Court Captain Jack Absolute by Mr. Matt Webber Faulkland by Mr. Samuel Powell Acres by Mr. Mark Dawson Sir Lucius O'Trigger by Mr. Michael Gilbert ACT I Scene I. — A street. Scene II. — A Dressing-room in Mrs. MALAPROP’s Lodgings. 444444 ACT II Scene I. — CAPTAIN ABSOLUTE’s Lodgings. Scene II. — The North Parade. 444444 ACT III Scene I — The North Parade. Scene II — JULIA’s Dressing-room. Scene III — Mrs. MALAPROP’s Lodgings. Scene IV — ACRES’ Lodgings. A A The action of the play takes place in the City of Bath in the Cou
  13. 13. 13 Backſtage Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Peter Norbury Aſſistant to Mr Norbury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Gilbert Producer & Tour Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ron Roberts Aſſistant to Mr Roberts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mark Dawſon Stage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stuart Lyddon Sound & Lights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graham Reeks Support Trawl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nicola Dawſon Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pam Fleming Aſſisted by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacqueline Roberts Costume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nikki Court & Rose Humphreys Rehearſal Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Joy Reaſon Tour Prompt . . . . . . . . . . . 1sr Week: Polly Bray, 2nd Week Jane Burt Van Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matt Webber Minibus Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dusty Miller Buſiness Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tony Beaven Finance & Box Office Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . Jacqueline Roberts 444444 ACT IV Scene I — ACRES’ Lodgings. Scene II — Mrs. MALAPROP’s Lodgings. Scene III — The North Parade. 444444 ACT V Scene I — JULIA’s Dressing-Room. Scene II — The South Parade. Scene III — King’s-Mead-Fields. 444444 County of Somerſet over a period of five hours one day in 1775.
  14. 14. 14 The Phoebe Rees Awards Founded by Phoebe Rees and run by the Somerſet Fellowſhip of Drama, the competition is open to amateur drama societies and groups in Somerſet. Plays are adjudicated by members of the Fellowſhip’s committee who alſo run an annual Original Play- writing Feſtival and the county’s first round of the All England Theatre Feſtival, and organiſe drama training. The Rose Bowl Awards Founded by the families of Walter Hawkins and John Coe, this is now funded through the Quartet Community Foundation, with individual awards sponſored by the Briſtol Evening Post. Amateur operatic and dramatic productions throughout former Avon, Glouceſter and Somerſet are aſſeſſed by GODA qualified adjudicators. Taunton Thespians are members of NODA The National Operatic and Dramatic Aſſociation (NODA), founded in 1899, is the main repreſentative body for amateur theatre in the UK. It has a memberstip of some 2500 amateur/community theatre groups and 3000 indi- vidual enthuſiasts throughout the UK, staging muſicals, operas, plays, concerts and pantomimes in a wide variety of performing venues, ranging from the country's leading profeſſional theatres to village halls. Members have acceſs to a wide range of benefits. NODA aimsTo give a ſhared voice to the amateur theatre ſector• To help amateur ſocieties and individuals achieve the highest ſtandards of best practice• and performance To provide leaderſhip and advice to enable the amateur theatre ſector to tackle the• challenges and opportunities of the 21st century
  15. 15. 15 The sheer unpredictability of touring is what I love. Dancing in the rain on uneven ground in high heels or sweltering in a huge wig and nylon voile, then last year I was squelching on a wet mat- tress in my underwear!. My last acting role was 5 months ago playing Miranda the Yorkshire mermaid, pushed on and off stage on a rock in The Wayfarers Panto’. Although Lucy, Lydia’s ladies maid, is only a minor role I have also been busy making the costumes, though luckily not as many as the 30 needed last year. Let’s hope they don’t get wet! Here I am again playing in the open air even though I vowed last year not to do it again. However Sir Anthony Absolute is a good part for me to play and so once again I auditioned. Not that I am a bombastic, controlling man, who has a dismissive attitude to women, though others may say different. Having acted in three out of my seven touring productions, I can say without a shadow of doubt that acting is the easier option. Remember there is a large technical team behind each production. They have my thanks. This is my first performance with the Taunton Thespi- ans, and I hope it is not my last. I got involved through my older brother, who has played in Thespians’ past produc- tions. I’ve had fun with the part and it’s done me good to move on from school plays. My overall ambition is to be in (perhaps even star in) an upbeat piece of musical theatre, as it is my passion.The Rivals was an ambitious leap, but it’s a hilarious play, and I believe I’ve grown as an actor. Nikki Court ~ Lucy Ray Court ~ Sir Anthony Absolute Jonny Leach ~ Thomas This is my fourth Summer Tour for the Thespians and Mr Fag is a very enjoyable character to play. In past years I have played Sergeant Verges in Much Ado About Nothing, Mr Brocklehurst in Jane Eyre, and besides directing Tom Jones last year, I played Lord Fellamar.These roles have been interspersed with both Demon and Hwyl in Wyrd Sisters, and Mark in Taking Steps. We are all praying to our own gods for fine weather this year, for fear of growing webbed feet with another tour in the rain! Enjoy The Rivals Andrew Miller ~ Fag
  16. 16. 16 I have always enjoyed drama, but since completing my drama degree in 2006, I have had little chance to pursue my pas- sion. However, when I heard the Thespians were performing The Rivals, I leapt at the opportu- nity. Previously, I had performed in The Relapse, a 17th Century comedy, so this was an intriguing progression from that. My char- acter, Faulkland, is such a complex personality, because of his psyche, that it has been a struggle and a challenge to comprehend him. However, through insight and a lot of hard work, I hope I have done him justice. This is my first year with the Taunton Thespians, and I am extremely excited to be a part of this year’s Summer Tour. I am no stranger to performing on stage; since college, I have been in a vari- ety of productions, including dance, drama and musicals. My passion for acting has not yet faded, and I hope this to be the first of many more Summer Tour performances that I will take part in. h a i r a I have taken a little break from the Thespians and it feels like I’ve been away too long! I really love The Rivals with its wonderful language, mala- propisms and asides to the audience – it’s great stuff! I did actually audition for it last time it was performed, but the director was obliged, blushingly, to telephone me to say the part that he had given me was now being offered to someone else, at which point I immediately challenged him to a duel and ran the dog through! No, I didn’t.This is my first Tour, so I’m very excited and will probably make lots of mistakes. Enjoy the show. Abi Vickery ~ Miss Hollie Cooper ~ Miss Julia Melville Samuel Powell ~ Mr Faulkland This is my 5th Summer Tour with the T playing an exotic dancer, an escort, a Fre nally fulfilling my ambition of playing a d me to my favourite highlight of this Tour dresses! Last year, when playing the slatte blouse covered in mud and gravy through leged now to be wearing a frilly frock! Le it and that we have as enjoyable a run as Matt Webber ~ Captain Jack Absolute
  17. 17. 17 I’ve been involved in Thespian shows at the Brewhouse many times, ei- ther on stage or working be- hind the scenes, but this is my first time acting out on Tour. I should have known better, having only finished playing Sam Blaine in our last show, Suddenly At Home, a week or two before the auditions for The Rivals. Presumably it’s some kind of masochistic madness and the 18th Cen- tury way of speaking makes it doubly hard. However, I’ve come round to thinking that Bob Acres is the most fun character in the whole play; ods lines and lapses, I say he is a fun character, by my valour! It is a great privilege to portray one of the greatest female comic acorns in our literary hermitage, and I shall endeavour to do the lady justice. We join her at the interception of a delicious little flotation with Sir Lucius O’Trigger, and she is vaccinating between censoring her headstrong niece, Lydia, for be- ing in love with a mere Ensign and swooning with the sensationalism of a new romance. A little foolish she may be, but deeply endearing and well meaning, and vastly more lustrous than last year’s scrubber. (And at least if I get any of my lines wrong, no-one will be any the wiser...) As an Irishman, playing an Irishman can be difficult.There are a lot of bad stereotypes out there, all full of bonhomie and fighting drunk. It’s wonderful to get a chance to play the dodgy and devious Sir Lucius, and to outsmart an English eejit for a change. Another huge plus about the part is not coming on until well into the show. As my friends and family know, punctuality is not my strongest suit... How- ever, it is a truly great play all round, and is very funny indeed, so sit back, relax and enjoy yourselves. Michael Gilbert ~ Sir Lucius O’Trigger Miss Lydia Languish Mark Dawson ~ Bob Acres Jane Edwards ~ Mrs Malaprop h the Taunton Thespians, and after t, a French child and a wench, I am fi- ing a dignified young lady... which brings s Tour: the opportunity to wear pretty e slatternly Molly, I had to wear a torn hroughout, so I therefore feel very privi- ock! Let’s just hope there’s no rain to ruin run as ever.
  18. 18. 18 Many Thanks to Jack Coulthard For the loan of his paintings for our production of “Suddenly At Home” Telephone – 01823 451516 Tainfield, Kingston St Mary,Taunton, Somerset Taunton Thespians are grateful to the following: Displaying billboards:.........ASDA Taunton; Yule, Brown,Taunton; Mr & Mrs Tooze, Chelston; The Westgate Inn,Taunton; The Civil Service Sports Club, Taunton Promotional displays:..........Shops & other premises in Taunton, Wellington and elsewhere Deploying billboards:..........Ron Roberts, Mark Dawson & Michael Gilbert Financial support................Our advertisers Transporting the set...........Webbers Removals
  19. 19. 19 Directed by Sylvia Fellgett, at The Brewhouse Theatre & Arts Centre, Taunton From Tuesday November 4th until Saturday November 8th, 2008 Curtain Up 7.45pm nightly, Saturday Matinee 2.30pm Tickets £12.50 Full, £10 Concessions Wilde’s scintillating drawing-room comedy revolves around a blackmail scheme that forces a married couple to re-examine their moral standards. A supporting cast of young lovers, society matrons, and a formidable femme fatale exchange sparkling repartee, keeping the action of the play at a lively pace. This wry look at the purity of political morals as relevant in the 21st Century as it was in the 19th. Tauntonthespianspresent talkingheadsbyalanbennettatthe tacchimorrisartscentre wed 24th - sat 27th september 2008 Coming Soon: d
  20. 20. 20 Tilly of Bloomsbury The Professor’s Love Story Ambrose Applejohn’s Adventure The Admirable Crichton The Rising Generation Berkeley Square Hay Fever Shall We Join The Ladies (OA) King’s Pawn (OA) Send Her Victorious (OA) The House with the Twisty Windows (OA) And So To Bed (OA) A Damsel in Distress Distinguished Gathering The Scarlet Pimpernel Tovarich (OA) The Vision at the Inn (OA) Love and How to Cure It(OA) A School for Coquettes (OA) Tangled Skeins (OA) Hay Fever (Act 1?) Villa For Sale (OA) The Sickness of Salome (OA) A Room in the Tower (OA) Today of All Days (OA) First Instalment (OA) Indoor Fireworks A Hundred Years Old George and Margaret Full House Ebb Tide (OA) Quiet Wedding The Middle Watch When We Are Married Candida Laburnham Grove Rookery Nook Grouse in June Arms and the Man Robert’s Wife Whiteoaks Housemaster This Happy Breed Carpet Slippers When Knights Were Bold Busman’s Honeymoon Acacia Avenue Quiet Weekend Frieda The Winslow Boy They Came to a City Rebecca Vanity Fair The Shop at Sly Corner The First Gentleman Thark Baa Baa Black Sheep Off the Record See How They Run Queen Elizabeth Slept Here Ten Little Niggers Playbill The Vigil The Giaconda Smile Bonaventure Great Day The Cradle Song The Cocktail Party The Importance of Being Psmith The River Line Arsenic and Old Lace Lady Windemere’s Fan The Heiress The Hollow Waters of the Moon The Lady’s not for Burning Treasure Hunt Pride and Prejudice The Poltergeist Dear Octopus Ring Round the Moon Seagulls over Sorrento Sabrina Fair Life with the Girls An Italian Straw Hat The Applecart The Confidential Clerk The Merchant of Venice A Question of Fact The House by the Lake Two Gentlemen of Verona The Noble Spaniard The School for Scandal Separate Tables The Vigil (Revival) A Murder has been Arranged Worlds Apart The Book of the Month The Reluctant Debutante Julius Caesar As Long as they’re Happy Reluctant Heroes Sailor Beware Witness for the Prosecution Dear Delinquent The Fruits of Knowledge Meet me by Moonlight Dry Rot Simple Spymen The Amorous Prawn The Chalk Garden The Deep Blue Sea The Brontës Waiting in the Wings A Taste of Honey A Streetcar Named Desire Breath of Spring Uncle Vanya Salad Days Spider’s Web Fool’s Paradise Flowering Cherry The Garden of Adonis The Irregular Verb To Love Not in the Book Teahouse of the August Moon Romanoff and Juliet Goodnight Mrs Puffin Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime The Happiest Days of your Life Don’t Listen Ladies A Penny for a Song Jane Eyre The Private Ear and the Public Eye The Importance of Being Earnest Tom Jones All My Sons Hobson’s Choice The Glass Menagerie Ladies in Retirement The Duenna Wait Until Dark Blithe Spirit The Barretts of Wimpole Street Rattle of a Simple Man The Birthday Party I’ll Get my Man Dandy Dick Farewell, Farewell, Eugene The Crucible Man and Superman Wild Goose Chase Waltz of the Toreadors Under Milk Wood Halfway up a Tree Great Expectations The Beaux Stratagem Relatively Speaking The Devil’s Disciple Oh! What a Lovely War A Day in the Death of Joe Egg Lock up your Daughters Pride and Prejudice Boeing Boeing The Secretary Bird An Inspector Calls A Man for all Seasons Becket B Th Th T M H C A Th Th A H B B Th Th H Su G T C A A T W C Th F R P U T T L L Fi B W T Th H C Th A U Q V D B C M C A Eighty Years of Taunton Th
  21. 21. 21 Bequest to the Nation The Lion in Winter The Rivals Toad of Toad Hall Move Over Mrs Markham Hay Fever Caesar and Cleopatra A View from the Bridge The Real Inspector Hound The School For Scandal Anastasia Habeas Corpus Barefoot in the Park Black Comedy The Killing of Sister George Three Sisters How the Other Half Loves Suddenly at Home Gaslight Treasure Island Charley’s Aunt Alice in Wonderland Abelard and Heloise Twelfth Night Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf Crown Matrimonial The Winslow Boy Flare Path Rebecca Pink String and Sealing Wax Uproar in the House Travesties Taking Steps Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime London Assurance Five Finger Exercise Birds on the Wing Worms Eye View Tom Jones The Boy Friend Haul for the Shore Christmas Carol The Wizard of Oz A Flea in her Ear Under Milk Wood Quiet Weekend Vivat!, Vivat Regina! Death Trap Blithe Spirit Cause and Effect Move Over Mrs Markham Confusions – Mother Figure A Family Occasion (oa) Brief Counsel (oa) Sailor Beware Voyage Round My Father Confusions – Between Mouthfuls Cinquepace (oa) Alfie An Inspector Calls Confusions Not Now Darling Waters of the Moon Absent Friends The Shop at Sly Corner Look Out for the Catch Dangerous Corner Hound of the Baskervilles Great Expectations Wanted One Body The Lion in Winter Witness for the Prosecution Barefoot in the Park Hobson’s Choice Up ‘n’ Under The Annotator (oa) Amadeus As You Like It The Donahue Sisters (oa) A Bedfull of Foreigners Cathedral - Ten Minutes (oa) Careful Rapture (oa) Madame De... (oa) Drama & Other Stories (oa) The Admission (oa) Come Blow Your Horn The Rivals A Resounding Tinkle (oa) And Then There Were None Our Town The Deep Blue Sea The Barretts of Wimpole Street Touch and Go Charley’s Aunt Pardon Me, Prime Minister A Christmas Carol What the Butler Saw Journey’s End Murder at the Vicarage Worm’s Eye View See How They Run Keeping Down With The Joneses May Day (oa) Thermal Underwear (oa) Cinquepace (oa) Valued Friends (ih) Philip & Rowena (oa) The Star Dusters (oa) The Children’s Hour Small World (oa) Communicating Doors Murder in the Cathedral (tr) Wildest Dreams When did you Last See Your Trousers The Crucible (ih) A Matter Of Fact (ih) Maria Marten or Murder in the Red Barn Woman in a Dressing Gown (ih) The Turn of the Screw Arsenic and Old Lace Peril at End House Funny Money Time and Time Again Comic Potential The Hound of the Baskervilles Thanks a lot Elton (oa) The Cagebirds (oa) After the Dream (oa) The Audition (oa) New Place & Time (oa) See if I Care (oa) Twelfth Night Can You Hear the Music (oa) A Midsummer Night’s Dream A Comedy of Errors Nude with Violin Diversions 1 (ih) Merry Wives of Windsor Thermal Underwear (oa) Hay Fever Diversions 2: The Waiting Room (ih) The Anniversary (ih) Move Over Mrs Markham The Law is an Ass (revue) The Hollow The Accrington Pals Murder in the Cathedral (tour) Sherlock’s Excellent Adventure There Goes the Bride People Who Live in Boxes (oa) You’re in Room Eight (oa) The Ghost Train Free Fall (oa) Jekyll and Hyde Suddenly At Home The Comedy of a Summer Season (oa) Jane Eyre Tom Jones The Zoo Story Much Ado About Nothing The Happy Journey (oa) Cash On Delivery Wyrd Sisters The Music Lovers (oa) Taking Steps Murdered to Death on Thespians’ Productions
  22. 22. 22 Taunton Thespians are President - John Meikle Vice Presidents - Margaret Way,Thelma Wander, Ron Roberts Honorary Member - Ted Goldsmith Terry Allison Julia Apperley Des Atkinson Patricia Attrill Annette Balaam Michael Barry David Beach Tony & Tessa Beaven Mark Bond Annie Bowles Penny Bradnum Neville & Polly Bray Charlotte Briggs Dona Bullion John & Carol Burbery Chloe Burt Jane Burt Jason Carter Hollie Cooper Ray & Nikki Court Jon Cozens Kim Crooks Arthur Duncan Cummins Barrie Dale James Davis Mark & Nicola Dawson David & Audrey Doig Jane Dyer Jane Edwards Sylvia Fellgett Terry Finn Pamela Fleming Keith Gibbons Michael Gilbert Ted Goldsmith David Goodall Maggy Goodall Kate Guest Anne Hague Bryan Hallett Christopher Hancock Jennifer Hancock Lynn Henden Sam Hill Richard Hockey Jean Hole John Howe Rose Humphreys Alison Jenkinson Linda Jenrick Martin Jevon Daniel Jones Cynthia Jones Carolynn Jureidini Margot Komarnicka Judith Laughton Jonny Leach Jane Leakey Michael Linham Clive Linthorne Stuart Lyddon Adrian Lynch Josephine Mann Hilary Marshall Alexandra Marshall Verity Martindill John & Audrey Meikle Andrew (Dusty) Miller Louise Mitchell Beryl Morris David Northey Marcus Palmer Andrew Pearce Nicola Gina Pearlstone Martin Peters Samuel Powell Holly Puckett Dinah Rawle Joy Reason Graham Reeks Ron Roberts Jacqueline Roberts Zoe Ryan Sarah Saunders Vivienne Sharland Sue Shaxon Robert Smith Richard Stenner Martin Stepney Freda Storey Nigel Stuart-Thorn Tessa Sutton Vera Sweeting Stuart Symonds Susanna Tookey Lucy Tozer Charlotte Trevithick Ryall Chris Tuffin Anthony Venn Abigail Vickery Emma Vickery Thelma Wander Margaret Way Matt Webber Donald Whateley Georgia Whelan Angela Widgery Terry Willis Alister Wilmott Helen Witcomb About Taunton Thespians The Taunton Thespians have reached their eighti- eth year, and have been providing live theatre for and by the people of Taunton and surrounding area since 1928.That February, Ian Hay’s Tilly of Bloomsbury was staged for 3 nights at the Lyceum Theatre, and was a great success. Over the inter- vening decades we have put on over 300 produc- tions of all types. It's fashionable to be patronising about amateur theatre or “amdram”. We're not sure why. Every year we entertain thousands of people by: Staging two major productions at the Brewhouse Participating in drama festivals in other theatres around Somerset Putting on in-house productions for members Spending two weeks touring a classic comedy every summer We also provide Murder Mystery evenings and Cabaret shows for parties and fund-raising events around the area, and are developing our outreach activities further. To see what's happening in amateur drama in Taunton, come along to a Club Night.There's no charge, and you're very welcome. Just drop along to “The Place” at 7.30pm on the first Wednesday of any month from October to May. If you do fancy joining us, there’s plenty to do, and it doesn’t have to involve getting up on stage. Ac- tors and actresses are always welcome, of course, but we do need people who want to design and build our sets, sort out costumes, do make up and hair – all sorts of things. Membership is only £12 a year, and it’s just about the most fun you can have for a pound a month! The Thespians’ home is “The Place” in Wilfred Road,Taunton. For more details call John Burbery on 01823 442118 or email membership@tauntonthespians.org.uk
  23. 23. 23 s d n s Forthcoming Auditions Alan Bennett’s Talking Heads Auditions Are to be held on Monday 28 and Tuesday 29 July. Playing dates at the Tacchi Morris Theatre, Monkton Heath- field are 24 – 27 September. Working copies are available on request to Ron. Rehearsals are a matter of individual arrangement, since there are three directors involved and one player per piece.The selected materials are as fol- lows. A Lady of Letters ………directed by Nicola Dawson. Irene Ruddock is not afraid to speak, or rather write, her mind. She writes letters to her MP, the police, the chem- ist – etc., to remedy the social ills she sees around her. After one too many accusations of misconduct from Irene’s pen, she is sent to prison where, for the first time in her life, she truly feels free. A Chip in The Sugar …..directed by Freda Storey. Graham is a middle-aged man with a history of mild, mental health problems, living with his mother in Leeds. He is an absolutely stereotypical Guardian reader – he wears flares, avoids deodorant, is environmentally con- scious, likes date and walnut bread and is very anti-Thatcher. It is also hinted that he is a closet homosexual. His life is dramatically changed when his mother, to whom he is effectively ‘married’, meets her old flame Frank Turn- bull after many years.Turnbull is bigoted, right-wing and racist but he is also well-dressed and well-off. Graham becomes increasingly jealous as Turnbull proposes marriage to Mum and suggests that Graham should move out. But Turnbull is hiding a secret which Graham discovers and confronts his mother with it, restoring the status quo but destroying her happiness in the process. Bed Amongst The Lentils ….directed by Ron Roberts. Susan is an alcoholic, a nervous vicar’s wife, distracts herself from her ambitions and, as she sees him, her vainly insensitive husband by conducting an affair with a nearby grocer, Ramesh Ramesh. In doing so, she discovers something about herself and God. Interestingly, she does not feel cheated when he ‘moves on’ to get married. Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband Auditions: Monday 4 August and Wednesday 5 August, both at 7.30pm. Production Dates 4 - 8 November at The Brew- house. Director is to be Sylvia Fellgett Characters (Ages are ‘a sensible guide’) LADY MARKBY (50ish): Pleasant and popular Bemoans the effect of politics and education of women on married life. EARL OF CAVERSHAM (55-60ish): Father to LORD GORING. Serious and ‘respectable’. Firmly against the excesses of his ‘dandified’ son, and constantly urges him to marry and get himself a decent ‘job’. VISCOUNT GORING (30ish): Son of Lord Caversham. Idle but intelligent. (Some say Wilde based him on himself) Irreverent, wry and witty. Good friend of Sir Robert Chiltern SIR ROBERT CHILTERN (40ish): Important member of Parliament. Very ambitious. He hides his past from his wife because of his love for her He is sometimes harried and nervous. LADY GERTRUDE CHILTON (Late 20 -30s): Virtuous and upright. Well educated and interested in her husband’s career MRS CHEVELEY (35 - 40s): A vicious opportunist, values wealth and power. Part of Sir Roberts ‘past’. MABEL CHILTON (20s): Younger sister of Sir Robert. Flirtatious, pert but clever. Her wit matches that of Lord Goring. Minor parts: LADY BASILDON AND MRS MARCHMONT Delicate charm and frivolous banter! VICOMTE DE NANJAC (youngish): Attaché at the French Embassy. (A sort of ‘malaprop’) MRMONTFORD Secretary to Sir Robert PHIPPS: Butler to Lord Goring JAMES, MASON AND HAROLD Footmen
  24. 24. 24 Taunton’s premier independent estate agents If you are thinking of buying or ſelling in the area, contact us firſt Estate agents - valuers - auctioneers Reſidential, Commercial & Development Surveyors Letting Agents & Property Management Winchester Houſe, Corporation Street, Taunton TA1 4AJ 01823 332121 www.wilkie.co.uk www.rightmove.co.uk

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