Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008




    VoiceCon Request for Proposal for an
           IP Telephony System

        ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008




                                  Preface


The following RFP document was exclus...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


VoiceCon IP Telephony System Request For Proposal

General Guidelines for Proposals...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


PART 1: System Performance Requirements

Submit Part 1 responses in MS Office WORD ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



                       Voicecon IPTS Network

                                    ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


combination to support IPTS desktop analog communications and PSTN
connectivity req...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


1.0.1    LAN/WAN Requirements

VoiceCon has not yet decided on the make/manufacture...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


and buildings, including the capability to support a centrally located
attendant po...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


   2) How are station user moves/adds/changes reported to the PSAP?

Nortel Respons...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



1.2.0 Proposed IPTS

Vendor Response Requirement
Provide the following information...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


capabilities delivering over 650 system, network and end user features. The CS
1000...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



The CS 1000E HA is comprised of two common control elements (one per
building), ea...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


   •   Primary call processor
   •   Main system memory
   •   Customer database me...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


across the two equipment rooms.

Nortel Response:
Comply. The common control elemen...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


(FMD) hosting a 1GB card serves as a hard disk equivalent and stores both the
syste...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


server. Restore routines can restore your data either via the faceplate Compact
Fla...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


requirements are recommended?

Nortel Response:
UPS are not supplied with the CS 10...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


connected via a patch cable to the I/O panel, which also has an RJ45 connection
on ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


Nortel Response:
Comply. The Nortel solution deploys the Nortel Media Gateway 1000E...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


For each of the remote facilities confirm that switchover to the local
survivable c...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


to that PBX. As well, if the user was remote and had some network access to
the CLA...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


and trunk networking as specified by IETF Work Group RFC documents,
including 3261,...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


    •   The software running for ports will not contain any known
        vulnerabi...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


•   Secure Access and Logging: Access to web-based management interfaces
    like t...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



•   An 802.1X supplicant on the phone side of the integrated Layer 2 switch,
•   E...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008




Vendor Response Requirements

Briefly describe any embedded features/functions in...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


capabilities include:
 • Stateful filtering and attack protection on traffic destin...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


        for toll-denied users. FCA can, for example, allow and charge long
        ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


Vendor Response Requirements
Briefly described any embedded features/functions in t...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


No access is possible within the system between these two interfaces. IP clients
ar...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



Nortel Response:
Comply.

Any security patches deemed to be applicable to all syst...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



2.0 IPTS Network Port Capacity Requirements
The proposed IPTS must be capable of s...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS communications solution be
designed to su...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



Station Equipment
   • Analog devices (VoiceCon provided):              50
       ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


   • Analog devices (VoiceCon provided):         5
         o 2500-type telephone i...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


3.0 Port Interface and Traffic Handling Requirements
The proposed IPTS must support...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


involving non-IP ports may be handled using a circuit switched network,
media gatew...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



VoiceCon requires an IPTS that satisfies a very high degree of reliability and
ser...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


addresses, default gateways, call controller, TFTP server, QoS settings,
VLANs, and...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


3.3   Multi-Party Conference Calls

The proposed system must be able to support six...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008



3.5.0 Port Interface Circuit Cards

For each of the following port types, provide ...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media
gateway.
...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


Vendor Response Requirement:
Provide a brief description how analog telephone instr...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


E1/T1 span can be configured with any PRI protocol variant or interface type, for
e...
Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008


4.0.0. Voice Terminal Instruments

The proposed communications system must be able ...
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation
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VoiceCon Orlando 2008: Presentation

  1. 1. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 VoiceCon Request for Proposal for an IP Telephony System Prepared by Allan Sulkin President, TEQConsult Group teqconsult.com VoiceCon Orlando 2008 Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 1
  2. 2. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Preface The following RFP document was exclusively designed and developed by TEQConsult for the VoiceCon ® Orlando 2008 Conference. The RFP is intended to solicit product information and pricing data about IP Telephony systems during the Fall 2007 time period. The RFP was written for a large multi-facility enterprise configuration with IP voice terminals as the primary station user interface to the system. TEQConsult Group recognizes that every business and institution has unique communications needs and resources, but the much of the material included herein will be of benefit to VoiceCon workshop attendees regardless of their unique system size and application requirements. VoiceCon workshop attendees may use this RFP as a template for customizing their own RFP, but only with expressed written permission from Allan Sulkin, TEQConsult Group (amsulkin@aol.com). Proper accreditation to TEQConsult Group for using this RFP in whole or part must be included in the resulting document. TEQConsult Group would like to thank Fred Knight, GM, Business Communications Review, and the publisher of Business Communications Review, for his review and editing of this document; Unimax Systems Corporation for its contributions to the systems management section of the RFP; and SecureLogix Corporation for its contributions to the security section of the RFP. . Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 2
  3. 3. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 VoiceCon IP Telephony System Request For Proposal General Guidelines for Proposals 1. Please read though the entire RFP before beginning to work on your response, and proof the proposal before submission. 2. Configure and price your system design to satisfy all stated RFP requirements, including any and all system hardware and software elements necessary to satisfy a requirement. 3. All products and solutions proposed for this RFP must be formally announced at time of VoiceCon Orlando 2008; pre-briefings of un­ announced products and offerings must be scheduled for and completed at least one month prior to the conference. 4. Do NOT provide material or information unrelated or not relevant to a specific RFP clause requirement. 5. Be brief, but complete, and provide succinct, clear, and unambiguous responses; do not obfuscate your responses with unnecessary wordage. When a vendor response calls for a brief description please restrain from providing more than 400 words of text. 6. Make sure to review and edit your proposal before submission. 7. All proposals are due by December 21, 2007. Deadline extensions will NOT be granted under any circumstances due to the immediate holiday break. 8. Proposal Evaluation The proposals to the RFP will be judged on the following factors: 1. Satisfaction of system performance requirements 2. Price of the proposed solution 3. Adherence to each of the above general proposal guidelines Important submission requirements: • Submit Part 1 System Performance Requirements responses in MS Office WORD file format, excluding responses to requirements specifying attached PowerPoint graphics, e.g., Clause 1.0.1. When PowerPoint format is requested do NOT copy/paste PDF format graphics or images. • Submit Part 2 System Pricing details in an attached MS EXCEL file format Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 3
  4. 4. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 PART 1: System Performance Requirements Submit Part 1 responses in MS Office WORD file format except where otherwise noted. 1.0.0 System Overview VoiceCon Company (VoiceCon) plans to install a new IP Telephony System (IPTS) at its newly constructed Campus Headquarters (CHQ) facility. The IPTS will also support two remote facilities, a Regional Office (RO) and a Satellite Office (SO). Distributed IPTS common control equipment must be installed in two equipment rooms located across the CHQ facility. All proposed call telephony servers must independently support all generic software features for the proposed IPTS as required in Section 5 of this RFP. The RO and SO facilities will have local trunk services, but will be configured as survivable remotes behind the centrally located IPTS at CHQ. It is mandatory that a single system image IPTS solution be proposed that satisfies the requirements listed later in this section of the RFP. The proposed IPTS must support 1,500 stations users distributed across the CHQ, RO, and SO facilities at time of system cutover. Anticipated VoiceCon expansion plans will require the proposed IPTS be capable of supporting 50% growth of all call processing and port capacity parameters distributed proportionately across the three facilities. The proposed IPTS must support this growth requirement without replacement of any installed hardware or generic software (excluding new release versions). The IPTS network configuration can be seen in Figure 1: Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 4
  5. 5. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Voicecon IPTS Network CHQ Equipment Equipment Room 1 Room 2 750 Stations 500 Stations RO SO 200 Stations 50 Stations WAN CHQ: Campus Headquarters RO: Regional Office SO: Satellite Branch Figure 1 VoiceCon plans to install a LAN/WAN cabling and a transport infrastructure that will fully satisfy the stringent requirements of IP Telephony communications for all intra-premises and inter-premises call control and voice communications transmissions. Each location will be equipped, at minimum, with a 1-Gbps Ethernet backbone. The local wiring closets will house 10/100/1000 Mbps Ethernet switches equipped with Power over Ethernet (PoE). Multi-service routers will be installed at all locations to support a MPLS WAN installation. All Ethernet switches and IP WAN routers will be equipped and programmed to satisfy QoS and security standards to support voice communications quality acceptable to VoiceCon. Pertinent bandwidth, latency, packet loss, and echo issues will be addressed by the LAN/WAN design and implementation. Each station user’s work area will be supported by four (4) four-pair, Category 5E cable wiring with one (1) RJ-11 wall connector and three (3) RJ­ 45 wall connectors to the local wiring closet. The RJ-11 and RJ-45 connectors will be either wall mounted or mounted in the modular furniture throughout the office environment. NOTE: The proposed IPTS will be required to support a limited number of non-IP stations, e.g., analog telephones, requiring a RJ-11 connector. The proposed system may use circuit switched port carriers, LAN-connected media gateways, or some Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 5
  6. 6. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 combination to support IPTS desktop analog communications and PSTN connectivity requirements. Vendor Response Requirement Based on the RFP requirements prepare a simple network diagram that illustrates the proposed IPTS design. Include in the diagram the brand name/model of the IPTSs, circuit switched port carrier/media gateway equipment, the brand/name of the IPTS systems management and messaging system. The diagram must be prepared and submitted in a separate attached file using MS PowerPoint format, and also copy/paste the diagram in the MS WORD submission. Nortel Response: Comply, see below and Appendix B. CHQ - CS 1000E HA 100 HA Telephony CallPilot Unified Manager (TM) Messaging 1005r Building 1 Building 2 CS 1000E High Availability LAN system with redundant call server, signaling server, MG 1000E PRI media gateways, and PRI Gateway Media Gateways providing campus redundancy Regional Office Satellite Office MG 1000E MG 1000E Survivable Media Survivable Media Gateway (MG 1000E) with Gateway (MG 1000E) with integrated Call Server integrated Call Server and Signaling Server and Signaling Server Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 6
  7. 7. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 1.0.1 LAN/WAN Requirements VoiceCon has not yet decided on the make/manufacturer of its new LAN/WAN communications equipment. Vendor Response Requirement Indicate if the proposed IPTS solution is requires manufacturer-specific LAN/WAN communications equipment to support any or all of the following voice communications operations or functions: call processing, port interface, network switching and routing, PoE, media gateway, QoS and security. Identify make/models of manufacturer-specific equipment if required. Nortel Response: The proposed solution is standards based and does not require equipment from a specified vendor. 1.1.0 Commercial Availability and Customer References The proposed IPTS equipment should be in current production and operating as part of a commercial system at a minimum of five (5) different customer installations. Vendor Response Requirement State if the proposed IPTS equipment satisfies this commercial availability requirement. If the IPTS model has not yet been shipped and installed in a commercial installation, state expected availability date. NOTE: All proposed system hardware and software must be formally announced as of VoiceCon Orlando 2008 to be accepted by VoiceCon as a response to this RFP. This is a mandatory requirement. Nortel Response: Comply. 1.1.1 Single System Image The proposed IPTS must provide to all system subscribers and administrators a Single System Image across VoiceCon CHQ, RO and SO facilities. The Single System Image must include, but not be limited to, the following: 1) 4- or 5-digit dialing between all station users; 2) Virtually 100% transparent operation across all VoiceCon facilities and buildings of station, attendant, and system features (see RFP Section 5: Call Processing Features); 3) CHQ-housed systems management server(s) utilizing a single unified database for all station user profiles, equipped system design, and system­ level operations; 4) Network-wide attendant operator services across all VoiceCon facilities Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 7
  8. 8. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 and buildings, including the capability to support a centrally located attendant pool; 5) CHQ-housed shared messaging system resources; 6) Automatic alternative routing across the network for all voice calls (station-to-station and PSTN trunk connections). Vendor Response Requirement: Answer each of the following questions: 1. Is the proposed IPTS network solution a true single system solution or multiple systems intelligently networked? 2. Does the proposed IPTS network solution fully satisfy all six (6) of the stated Single System Image requirements? If not, identify and explain which of the requirements are not fully satisfied? Nortel Response: 1. Yes - the proposed solution consists of a single system. 2. Comply. 1.1.2 Enhanced 911 (E911) Services Support It is mandatory that the proposed IPTS support E911 services provided by a public safety answering point (PSAP) as defined by FCC regulations. Each of the three VoiceCon facilities utilizes a different PSAP. All VoiceCon IPTS station user E911 calls must be directed to their local PSAP for call handling and response regardless of location, VoiceCon corporate facilities and teleworker residence. If more than one E911 solution is available for the proposed IPTS network configuration clearly specify the solution that is included in the price proposal. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that the proposed communications system solution supports E911 service for all user stations (IP and analog) regardless of physical location. Nortel Response: Comply; the proposed solution supports E911 service for all user stations (IP and analog) at each VoiceCon facility across multiple PSAP’s. Also, briefly explain how E911 service requirements are supported, specifically addressing each of the following questions: 1) A description of any optional hardware/software equipment, including peripheral servers. [Note: Include the price of all required equipment, including servers, in the pricing proposal] Nortel Response: No additional hardware or software is required to support the requirements based on our standard offering. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 8
  9. 9. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 2) How are station user moves/adds/changes reported to the PSAP? Nortel Response: With normal station users moves/adds/changes it is not required to update the PSAP as the response location (ERL) location database information has not changed. If emergency response location (ERL) locations are added or removed then a manual update to the PSAP database will be required. 3) What degree of specificity station user location is identified to the E911 PSAP? Desktop work area, local switch room, work floor, other? Nortel Response: With the standard offering, the granularity of reporting is determined by the customer and their specific E911 response requirements. The level of granularity can be to the desktop, a defined physical area in a building, or the main building address itself. This level of support is available to all devices in the system regardless of their technology (e.g. TDM, VoIP, Analog or Digital). Additionally, the Emergency Call Location call routing information can support alternate routing, and dynamic assignment of PSTN callback numbers to non-DID users. 1.1.2.1 E911 and Station Moves Station user moves behind the proposed IPTS solution should be tracked dynamically in real time for E911 services support. Vendor Response Requirement: Indicate if the proposed E911 solution satisfies this requirement and indicate how often the local and PSAP databases are updated. Nortel Response: With the included Internal Layer 3 Discovery option, which is an integrated software component, all IP devices are tracked at Layer 3 via their IP address. IP Address ranges are assigned to specific physical areas within the building (Emergency Caller Locations), and the Emergency Services for Client Mobility (ESCM) Discovery manager applies the proper emergency services profile to the IP telephones upon registration with the CS 1000. Emergency Call Location properties include E911 call routing information, to support multiple PSAPs, the specific Calling Line ID to be used for E911 calls and direct station callback as well as location specific On Site Notification properties to alert local personnel that an emergency call has taken place. The CS 1000E also provides an SSL interface that allows external 3rd party Location Identification Servers (LIS) to provide information on IP telephone moves dynamically. The local Call Server database is now updated in real-time automatically without impact to active call processing. Using this interface, the location of the telephone is determined by the Emergency Caller Location information provided by the external 3rd party LIS. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 9
  10. 10. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 1.2.0 Proposed IPTS Vendor Response Requirement Provide the following information regarding your proposed IPTS as details are requested in following sections: 1. Product and model name(s) for the IPTS and messaging system 2. Software release for each product/model proposed 3. Product/model commercial availability dates Nortel Response: 1) The Nortel Communication Server (CS) 1000E HA (High Availability) communications systems with survivable media gateways is proposed at the Headquarters location with Nortel CallPilot as the unified messaging system. 2) Nortel CS 1000E HA system running Release 5.5 Nortel CallPilot system running Release 5.0 3) Nortel CS 1000E – July 2004; Release 5.5 availability- March 28th CallPilot – September 1997; Release 5.0 availability – September 2007 1.3.0 IPTS Design Platform The proposed system solution may be based on either of the following two architecture system designs: • Converged TDM/IP: call telephony servers supporting LAN/WAN distributed circuit switched port interface cabinets with integrated media gateway interfaces for IP port connectivity • Client/server: call telephony servers supporting LAN-connected media gateway equipment for non-IP port connectivity Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly describe the system architecture and design elements of the proposed IPTS solution. Include in your system description basic information about the following common equipment hardware elements: 1. Architecture design: converged or client/server) 2. Call telephony servers and associated common control equipment 3. Circuit switched port carrier/interface equipment, if applicable 4. LAN-connected media gateways (server-embedded, standalone, switch/router-equipped, desktop), if applicable Nortel Response: The proposed CS 1000E is a converged design with both pure IP and TDM Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 10
  11. 11. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 capabilities delivering over 650 system, network and end user features. The CS 1000 is architected on a real-time VxWorks and Nortel Carrier Grade Linux operating system kernel with highly controlled interfacing options for increased security. This real-time operating system gives priority to call processing over management tasks - critical for telephony environments. The Call Server provides call processing capability for up to 22,500 IP phones. The Signaling Server provides a registration and connection point for up to 5,000 IP Phones. It also provides a standard SIP and/or H.323 Gateway signaling interface for signaling other IP Gateways within the network, and an H.323 Network Routing Server (the NRS is similar in function to a Gatekeeper) which provides a mechanism for controlling the various SIP/H.323 elements within the system. An Element Manager built on a web server inside the Signaling Server supports configuration of the Gatekeeper, the network dialing plan and other IP related management duties. Signaling Servers may be deployed singly or in a redundant configuration whereby registration duties are load shared between them. Both the Call Server and Signaling Servers utilize Pentium M/4 based processors which are located within the Media Gateway chassis. The CS 1000E utilizes the Media Gateway 1000E (MG 1000E) and the MG 1000E PRI to support analog and digital lines and trunks, IP-TDM conversion capabilities, and value-add feature modules. 1.3.1 Common Control There are several mandatory common control requirements. 1.3.1.1 Common Control Housing VoiceCon requires that all IPTS host common control elements be fully embedded in compact housing with internal interfaces to media gateways, non-IP port circuit interfaces, and service circuit boards. Call control signaling to/from all IP endpoints must be supported through an integrated Ethernet LAN uplink connector, e.g., RJ-45. The cost benefits of this fully integrated design are reduced hardware, power, and system footprint requirements. 1.3.1.1.1 CHQ Host Common Control Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly describe the hardware housing for all CHQ-located common control elements (call processing, signaling, et al), specifically including size (H x L x W), weight (standard common assembly), fan cooling units, and all embedded hardware components. Include in the response technical information for both CHQ-located host common control and RO/So-located local survivable processing equipment. Nortel Response: The housing is based on a 19” rack mountable chassis. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 11
  12. 12. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 The CS 1000E HA is comprised of two common control elements (one per building), each with their own call processor, signaling servers and media gateways with integrated fan cooling units. Building #1 houses 5 MG 1000E chassis and 1 MG 1000E PRI gateway Building #2 houses 2 MG 1000E chassis and 1 MG 1000E PRI gateway MG 1000E Gateways have the following dimensions and weight: 8.4” x 12.8” x 17.2”, 30lbs. The MG 1000E PRI gateway: 2.5”x 18” x 17.3”, 18lbs Building #1 has an external 1u SIP proxy server for integration with our UC solution, with the following dimensions and weight: 1.75”x22”x17.3”, weight 28lbs. 1.3.1.1.2 RO/SO Local Common Control Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly describe the hardware housing for all RO and SO local common control elements (call processing, signaling, et al), specifically including size (H x L x W), weight (standard common assembly), fan cooling units, and all embedded hardware components. Nortel Response: The housing is based on a 19” rack mountable chassis format with the following elements and dimensions: The Survivable Media Gateways are comprised of MG 1000E chassis, each with their own call processor and signaling servers, with integrated fan cooling units. Weight and dimensions as follows: 17.2” x 12.8” x 8.4”, 30lbs The RO will have 2 MG 1000E chassis. The SO will have 2 MG 1000E chassis. 1.3.1.2 Common Control Redundancy The IPTS common control must be based on a fully redundant duplicated design. Redundant components may be provisioned as active/passive or load sharing with seamless switchover operation between control elements in case of errors or failure. All active calls and programmed feature states must be preserved during the switchover process. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that the proposed IPTS common control fully satisfies the requirement for a fully redundant duplicated design and identify if it is based on an active/passive or load sharing (pooled) design. In your response confirm which of the following elements are provisioned in fully redundant mode and specify the design option (active/passive, load sharing, pooled resources, et al.): Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 12
  13. 13. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 • Primary call processor • Main system memory • Customer database memory • RJ-45 Ethernet uplinks to network • Power supply • Tone generators • Call classifiers • Registers • DTMF receivers • I/O interfaces Nortel Response: Comply – the proposed solution is based on an active/passive design. The call processor, system memory, database memory, RJ-45 ports power supplies and I/O interfaces are redundant in the hot standby arrangement. A failure in any of these components will cause the system to switch to the standby processor. Additional details on the components identified are listed below. • Primary call processor - Fully redundant as noted above. • Main system memory - Fully redundant as noted above. • Customer database memory - Fully redundant as noted above. • RJ-45 Ethernet uplinks to network - Full redundancy supplied either through redundant components in our proposal (e.g. call processors), redundant uplinks (e.g. Media Gateway Controllers), or both. • Power supply - Redundancy provided through redundancy components in our proposal. • Tone generators - Redundancy provided through redundancy components in our proposal. • Call classifiers - Redundancy provided through redundancy components in our proposal. • Registers - Redundancy provided through redundancy components in our proposal. • DTMF receivers - Redundancy provided through redundancy components in our proposal. • I/O interfaces - Redundancy provided through redundancy components in our proposal. 1.3.1.3 Distributed Control Redundant duplicated common controllers must be installed in each of the two CHQ equipment rooms. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that redundant duplicated common control elements are distributed and installed in each of the two CHQ equipment rooms. Describe how the distributed common control elements are physically and logically linked Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 13
  14. 14. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 across the two equipment rooms. Nortel Response: Comply. The common control elements are physically connected via a hot standby Ethernet link, which is extended over an IP network. Real-time call processing registers are synchronized between the control elements. 1.3.1.4 Call Processing The proposed IPTS must handle a minimum of 150,000 Busy Hour Call Completions (BHCCS) in its proposed system design and fully equipped configuration. Nortel Response: Comply. 1.3.2 Call Processor Make/Model Vendor Response Requirement: Identify the make/model of the main processor for the proposed common control system. Nortel Response: The proposed CS 1000E utilizes Intel Pentium M based processors with the following features: • Rated at 1,000,000 BHCC (simple IP to IP call) • Two compact flash sockets (one on board and one on the faceplate) • DDR RAM 1GB (up to 2 GB) 1.3.3 Call Processing O/S Vendor Response Requirement: Identify the primary operating system used by the main processor of the proposed common control system. Linux is preferred, but not mandatory. Nortel Response: The CS 1000E Call Server and Signaling Server utilize the VxWorks 5.5 real-time operating system. Network Routing Services are available on both Linux 4.0 and VxWorks 5.5 OS. 1.3.4 Memory Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly describe system memory and storage design for both generic software and customer database requirements. Nortel Response: The Pentium M processors of a CS 1000E system are equipped with a 1 GB DDR DRAM DIMM. This is expandable up to 2 GB. An internal Compact Flash slot Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 14
  15. 15. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 (FMD) hosting a 1GB card serves as a hard disk equivalent and stores both the system software and customer data. A faceplate accessible Compact Flash slot serves as the removable drive for data backup and software upgrades. With this design there are no moving parts and no spinning drives that may fail. 1.3.4.1 Database Integrity Vendor Response Requirement: How does the proposed IPTS solution maintain the integrity of the customer database between back-ups? Nortel Response: In a redundant system the database is automatically duplicated to the standby call server and survivable call servers. Additionally, each of the processors maintains two copies of the database image. 1.3.4.2 Database Information Loss Vendor Response Requirement: Identify under what circumstances can customer database information (configuration, messages, logs, etc.) be lost during back-ups Nortel Response: Backup can be accomplished by copying the database to the faceplate accessible compact flash or via an FTP transfer to a customer defined server. User intervention or network issues could affect the backup data, however an up to date copy would still be available on the redundant processors. 1.3.4.3 Database Backup Scheduling Vendor Response Requirement: How often should the customer database be backed up? Specify if it is a full or incremental backup and the time the process takes. Nortel Response: Database backup should occur after any configuration changes to the CS 1000E. The redundant core will automatically receive the database after a change and an image backup to the hard drive will occur automatically during the midnight routine if a change was made. FTP backups are configurable to an hourly level. 1.3.4.4 Data Purging/Archiving Vendor Response Requirement: Describe the mechanism for data purging and archival, including storage and retrieval of archived data. Nortel Response: CS 1000E customer data can be stored on Compact Flash via the faceplate accessible port or alternatively, the data can be sent via FTP to any storage Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 15
  16. 16. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 server. Restore routines can restore your data either via the faceplate Compact Flash or via FTP from any storage server. 1.3.5 Power Supply Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly describe common control power requirements and the integrated power distribution design. Indicate if the power supply is dependent on either an AC or DC current source. Nortel Response: Each Call Server, Signaling Server and Media Gateway contains an AC power supply. Power requirements are shown in the following table: Current, power and cooling requirements for CS 1000E components Component Current @120/240 V AC Required UPS power Thermal dissipation (A) (W) (Btu) Maximum Typical Maximum Typical Maximum Typical Core Call 2.50/1.25 1.00/0.50 300.00 120.00 1023.90 409.56 Server 1U IBM 5.50/2.8 3.00/1.5 550.00 50.00 1024.00 682.00 Signaling Server MG 1000E 1.40/0.70 1.17/0.58 300.00 190.00 1023.60 648.30 MG 1000E 1.15/0.58 1.17/0.58 300.00 145.00 1023.60 494.70 Expander MG 1000E 1.10/0.55 1.11/0.56 300.00 140.00 1023.60 480.0 PRI Gateway 1.3.5.1 Power Safeguards Vendor Response Requirement: Describe any power failure safeguards that are included in the IPTS design. Briefly describe what happens to system operation during a power failure Nortel Response: Call processor has redundant cores each with separate power supplies. A failure of the active core power supply will cause call processing to be assumed by the inactive core. To safeguard against a total site power outage, it is recommended that all components have a power backup. In the event of the backup failure, the Survivable Media Gateway feature can provide call processing support to all phones and media gateways. 1.3.5.2 Power Backup Vendor Response Requirement: Does the proposed IPTS solution come equipped with standard UPS hardware, and if so how long can the system run on it? If not, what UPS Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 16
  17. 17. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 requirements are recommended? Nortel Response: UPS are not supplied with the CS 1000. The UPS system power requirements are shown in the above table. 1.3.5.3 Power Consumption VoiceCon desires an IPTS with reduced power consumption requirements compared to earlier generation system designs. Vendor Response Requirement: Provide data regarding common control power consumption requirements and heat dissipation levels (BTUs) for the proposed IPTS solution. Nortel Response: See table provided in response to section 1.3.5. 1.3.5.4 Environmental Initiatives Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly identify any current or planned IPTS design initiatives to reduce power consumption requirements and heat dissipation levels. Nortel Response: Nortel continues to seek ways to improve and reduce power consumption in its products by improving our designs. By integrating call server and signaling server capabilities on the CS 1000 within our media gateway chassis we have seen significant reductions in both rack space and power consumption. We will continue to seek ways to improve density and scalability while reducing the need for hardware based components. 1.3.6 Ethernet Call Control Signaling Links Vendor Response Requirement: Identify for each active and standby call telephony server the number of available and configured RJ-45 Ethernet LAN uplink interfaces for call control signaling to LAN-connected cabinets/carriers and/or standalone ports. Include a brief description of how the physical Ethernet connection is provided: dedicated circuit board; daughterboard; fully integrated RJ-45 connector, et al. Nortel Response: The fully redundant Call Processors each have a 10/100 Mbps Ethernet connection on their I/O panel for the Embedded LAN or ELAN connection to outboard application servers. The ELAN is used for both management and call processing applications between outboard servers and the Call Processors. The CPU pack has a 100Mbps RJ45 connection on the front panel, which is then Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 17
  18. 18. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 connected via a patch cable to the I/O panel, which also has an RJ45 connection on both sides of the panel, (one for the patch cable and one for the ELAN connection). The Signaling Server has two RJ45 10/100 Mbps Ethernet connections. One is for the ELAN connection and the other is for the Telephony LAN or TLAN connections for the IP signaling out to the devices and endpoints on the customer network. Media Gateway Controller Cards has an embedded Ethernet switch which provides connection to internal modules, as well as two Ethernet connections for dual homed connections to the network. 1.3.7 System Clocks Vendor Response Requirement: Identify the number and type of internal system clocks that are available and configured. Nortel Response: There are basically two types of internal system clocks. • The Call Processor contains a real time clock that maintains the time and date clock. Network Time Protocol allows the time and date to be synchronized with an authoritative NTP server. • For TDM devices, one Stratum 3 clock controller is provisioned per media gateway to provide clock synchronization between trunk cards and the Central Office. 1.4 Remote Survivability In standard operating mode station users at RO and SO facilities will be supported by CHQ common control. It is required that station users at the RO and SO facilities be provided with full, uninterrupted access to all IPTS features and services regardless of CHQ common control failure or LAN/WAN connectivity issues due to switch, router, or private network transmission service errors or failures. Each remote facility must perform a seamless switchover to a local secondary common control while all active local intercom and trunk calls, and programmed feature states, e.g., call forwarding, are preserved. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that the proposed IPTS solution satisfies this requirement for remote local survivability and briefly describe the local hardware/software solution at each of the two remote facilities necessary to support the seamless switchover operation. Indicate the time it takes to perform the switchover if not instantaneous and what happens during this time period, including access and implementation of generic software features and functions. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 18
  19. 19. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Nortel Response: Comply. The Nortel solution deploys the Nortel Media Gateway 1000E (MG 1000E) equipped as survivable Media Gateways at the RO and SO sites. The MG 1000E is the general purpose media gateway previously described. By equipping the MG 1000E with a CP-PM call processor card, it is transformed into a Survivable Media Gateway. As a Survivable Media Gateway, it contains a complete copy of the entire system database. Upon loss of contact with the primary system (active and stand-by processors) for any reason, whether due to LAN/WAN incidents or a failure of the primary system, it will provide survivable service to all clients located at that site or otherwise designated to draw survivable services. In addition, should the primary system be lost but the IP WAN continue to be available, it can operate and control the entire system of thousands of IP phones as well as MG 1000E units operating at other sites. When providing survivable services to IP clients, the Survivable Media Gateway 1000E provides the same level of telephony features that the clients enjoyed while connected normally to the primary system since the system is operating from a copy of the main Call Server database. The Gateway can provide dial­ around services to clients in survivable mode to allow them to reach headquarters and other sites transparently. Basic access to other sites can be provided over any PSTN trunking; PRI trunking will allow full direct dial service. The switchover time take 1.5 minutes for the MG 1000E to register with the alternate call server. Concurrently the signaling server switches over upon loss of connectivity with the signaling server leader. The signaling server default setting for the switchover timer is set to 2 minutes, but this can be configured lower if required. 1.4.1 Survivable IPTS Features/Services Vendor Response Requirements: Identify any required generic software feature or (See Section 5.0 Call Processing Features) or system function (including E911 support services) not available or operational when the local survivability option is activated at either the RO or SO facility. Also identify any type of station user equipment (instruments, consoles, soft phones, mobile clients, et al) not supported in local survivability mode at either of the two facilities. Nortel Response: All features are supported in survivable mode for VoiceCon’s Remote office (RO) and satellite office (SO) facilities. All station user equipment is supported in survivable mode for these two facilities. 1.4.2 Local Survivability Failover and Switchback Vendor Response Requirements: Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 19
  20. 20. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 For each of the remote facilities confirm that switchover to the local survivable common control option seamless, i.e. no interruption of in-process telephony services, for any or all stations users if WAN connectivity is disrupted to the HQ IPTS? Also provide answers to the following: • Is there a station user recognizable delay in dial tone and call implementation after the WAN disruption? • Describe the switchback process when HQ facility IPTS common control is again accessible, specifying if the process is automatic or manual and how long the process takes to implement • Are connected calls and/or telephony server operations at the remote facility affected in any way during the switchback process? If the answer is yes, describe how they are affected. Nortel Response: Switchover to local survivable common control at remote facilities is seamless without user intervention. Services and calls using the WAN will be disrupted. Local IP calls will not be disrupted. Calls requiring gateway resources will be affected. There is no station user recognizable delay in dial tone and call implementation after WAN disruption. The switchback process, when CHQ IPTS common control is reestablished, is automatic. The switch back time take 1.5 minutes for the MG 1000E to re­ register with the primary call server. Concurrently the signaling server will initiate a ‘reelection’ of a leader. The signaling server default setting for the switchover timer is set to 2 minutes, but this can be configured lower if required. Connected calls and or telephony server operations at the remote facility are not affected during the switchback process. The switchback process will occur during a quiescent call time or with manual intervention. 1.4.3 Survivable Messaging Services It is desirable that remote station users at the RO and SO facilities have access to messaging services (see Section 7) if there is a WAN link disruption to the HQ messaging system. Vendor Response Requirements Briefly describe how messaging services would be accessed and implemented by remote station users when there is a WAN link disruption. Would any messaging features/functions not be supported in this situation. Nortel Response If there is a WAN link network-pathway disruption to the HQ messaging system, users would still have access to their message store with full features/functions by dialing into CallPilot system at HQ directly over DID or other trunks attached Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 20
  21. 21. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 to that PBX. As well, if the user was remote and had some network access to the CLAN connected to the CallPilot at HQ (i.e. via via Nortel VPN Routers), they’d have access to their voice/fax messages via Desktop Messaging and/or My CallPilot. 1.4.4 Network Failover Resiliency VoiceCon desires that the proposed IPTS support network failover resiliency to a comparable IPTS located at a remote facility in the unlikely event the redundant CHQ common control (primary active/active or active/passive) becomes nonfunctional for any reason? Network failover resiliency requires that all IPTS station users and port carrier/media gateway equipment at all facilities (CHQ, SO, and BO) can automatically re-register to a designated back-up IPTS if so programmed. Vendor Response Requirements Respond to each of the following: • Can the proposed IPTS solution support network failover resiliency to another back-up IPTS in case of a catastrophic CHQ common control failure? • If yes, briefly describe the failover process including the time required before full telephony services are available to re-registered station users. • Can there be more than one designated back-up IPTS? Nortel Response: Comply, with no additional hardware of software elements required. The CS 1000E has the ability to provide call processing at the two remote locations with the Survivable Media Gateways. Any media gateway can register with up to 3 call processors in the event that they can no longer connect to the main system. Any IP set may register with any two call processors in the event a set looses connectivity with its main system (eg. at HQ site). All call servers have the ability to support all the system end points or a subset of them within the network provided there is WAN connectivity between the sites. In the event sets cannot reach either the primary or secondary call processor, sets will revert to their local system in survivable mode. All features of the CS 1000E are supported in survivable mode at the MG 1000E sites. The time to complete a network failover from one system to another is in the order of several seconds. The proposed system can support a number of network failover designs, as each remote system can identify an independent backup system in the event of a common equipment or WAN link failure at the HQ site. 1.5 Session Initiated Protocol (SIP) VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS support SIP-compatible stations Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 21
  22. 22. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 and trunk networking as specified by IETF Work Group RFC documents, including 3261, 3263, 3264, 3265, 3604 and 4456,. Vendor Response Requirements Respond to each of the following: • Does the proposed IPTS conform to IETF SIP specifications cited above 3261? • Is the proposed IPTS solution based on a native-SIP design or is optional hardware/software required? Indicate if optional equipment is required to support SIP communications protocol specifications. • Can the proposed IPTS support SIP-compliant desktop telephone instruments? • Can the proposed IPTS support SIP trunk services? Indicate if optional SIP proxy gateways are required? • Can the proposed IPTS support SIP-enabled applications, such as Internet conferencing, telephony services and features, presence, events notification and instant messaging? Indicate if optional server equipment is required. Nortel Response Comply; the CS 1000 conforms to IETF SIP specification RFC 3261 as requested above. Additionally we also conform to the following SIP specifications: RFC 3264, 3262, 3311, 3323, 3325, 3326, 2976, 3265, 3515, 3842, 2806. SIP communications are native to the CS 1000 platform; additional hardware may be required to support the optional SIP application depending upon your deployment configurations. Yes, the proposed IPTS supports SIP complied desktop instruments. Yes, the proposed IPTS supports SIP trunk services, without the need for an additional SIP proxy gateway. Yes, the CS 1000 solution can support SIP-enabled applications such as conferencing, presence and IM through the integration with the Nortel Multimedia Communications Solution (MCS) 5100 and other SIP based solutions such as Microsoft’s Office Communication Server. 1.6.1 Unauthorized System Access VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS solution be secure against unauthorized system access. The following system design and configuration guidelines should be followed: • All unnecessary ports, such as telnet, SNMP, etc. will be closed by default. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 22
  23. 23. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 • The software running for ports will not contain any known vulnerabilities. • Administrative interfaces will not ship with known default passwords. • Default community strings for SNMP will not be used. SNMP version 3 will be supported. • The switch network will support security features such as VLANs, Network Admission Control (NAC), and other features. • Key components, such as the call processor, media gateway, or associated servers/cards will have built in host-based intrusion prevention systems. Vendor Response Requirements Confirm that the proposed IPTS solution satisfies each of the above listed security attributes. Briefly describe authentication processes embedded in the proposed IPTS solution to prevent unauthorized access to common control elements, data resources; and abuse of telephony services, e.g., toll fraud. Nortel Response: Comply – as noted below. All necessary ports are protected by application and with the deployment of the Secure Multimedia Controller (SMC) 2450 firewall. Initial default passwords are provide however Nortel forces password changes once users log into an account with a default password. Default community strings of public and private are not used; however, SNMP version 3 is not currently supported. It is being considered for a future release. Nortel’s solution includes the SMC 2450 for intrusion prevention. Access to the common control elements is tightly controllable whether directly accessing the system or using the CS 1000 Telephony Manager. • Passwords and Access Roles: Limited Access Passwords can be defined to provide a high degree of access control and to enhance tracking of system access and operational activities. Password controls include password aging, reuse & history, configurable guessing lockout and complexity requirements, forced default change, and more. Passwords are stored encrypted using SHA-256 hashing. Administrator roles can be defined, accessible through one or more passwords, and assigned to different groups of administrators, technicians and users. The CS 1000 Telephony Manager software leverages Windows platform user accounts and groups which provide platform access control, audit trails, and secure installation controls, such as the ability to implement authentication through the Windows Server Domain, and the use of SSL for LDAP synchronization and authentication. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 23
  24. 24. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 • Secure Access and Logging: Access to web-based management interfaces like the Element Manager and NRS Manager can be established using SSL/TLS encryption protocols. SSH Secure Shell is used for remote logins, and Secure FTP (sFTP) is used for secure file transfer. Security logging records information such as remote login information, account creation, deletion, or modification, and role creation, deletion, or modification. • Secure System Signaling: Signaling between components of the CS 1000 is secured through the use of SIP TLS and IPSec to prevent eavesdropping. Telephone Abuse and Toll-Fraud Protection: The CS 1000 offers an extensive set of voice security features which control user privileges and access to voice services, including: • Class of Service assigns call origination and receiving privileges at the station and trunk level to control the degree of access to external networks and certain features within the system, • Trunk Group Access Restrictions control access for basic and network automatic route selection, • Access Restrictions limit terminal access to the exchange network, private network, and certain services and features. They can be temporarily overridden by the use of other features such as Forced Charge Account, Authorization Codes and System Speed Call, • Authorization Codes allow users to temporarily override access restrictions assigned to any station or trunk by dialing an authorization code. This allows user identification for billing, user Class of Service, and network access control, • Network Authorization Codes extend Authorization Code functionality to provide up to 20,000 codes used for accessing calls, routes, and features throughout a private network, • Station Specific Authorization Codes provide control of the level of authorization code access on a per telephone basis, • Forced Charge Accounts temporarily override Class of Service restrictions for toll-denied users. FCA can, for example, allow and charge long distance calls to an account number when calling from a telephone that is restricted from making long distance calls. • Direct Inward System Access (DISA) uses a combination of security code and access code to authorize calling abilities, • Call Forward External Deny provides the option to restrict, on a per telephone basis, the directory number that can be programmed for Call Forward All Calls, • Malicious Call Trace provides information about a Malicious Call. Enhanced Malicious Call Trace allows a recording device to be conferenced with a Malicious Call. Terminal Access to Services: Port-based authentication of IP phones is supported using 802.1x and Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP). EAP­ enabled networks allow the administrator to ensure that individual devices and/or users are authorized to access the enterprise’s LAN environment. Capabilities include: Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 24
  25. 25. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 • An 802.1X supplicant on the phone side of the integrated Layer 2 switch, • EAP with MD5 authentication, • The ability to allow traffic from the PC port of the Layer 2 switch (in the phone) to pass through the switch independent of state of the phone authentication. 1.6.2 Unauthorized Network Access VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS solution be secure against unauthorized network access. Vendor Response Requirements Briefly describe call type detection and prevention processes embedded in the proposed IPTS solution to identify and prevent: • Unmonitored and non-secured Internet sessions by employees calling private Internet Service Providers accounts using modems connected to corporate phone lines. • Unlawful data network access by outsiders penetrating through modem-enabled corporate phone lines connected to LAN/WAN accessible workstations and other equipment. Nortel Response: Based upon dial number restrictions, employees would be prevented from calling private ISPs using the proposed IPTS. Based upon caller line ID, restrictions could be set to restrict against unauthorized use of Modem enabled lines. With call detail records, abuse of IPTS resources can be flagged and appropriate security actions taken. It is recommended that modems with two way challenge passwords be utilized to prevent abuse. 1.6.3 Disruption of Services VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS solution be secure against disruption of services. A minimum, the vendor will should: • Provide built-in DoS resiliency for all components processing signaling and audio. • Provide embedded or compatible third party firewalls, IDS/IPS systems, or anti-DoS systems will be available. • Support DoS detection and mitigation capabilities in network switches • Provide a solution for malformed or “fuzzed” packets • Provide protection for key supporting infrastructure services, such as TFTP, DHCP, DNS, etc. will be provided. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 25
  26. 26. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Vendor Response Requirements Briefly describe any embedded features/functions in the proposed IPTS solution that will reduce probability of telephony services disruption due to Denial-of-Service (DoS) attacks and address each of the above listed items in your response. Nortel Response: The CS 1000 is highly resistant to Denial-of-Service and other attacks through both design and well-defined implementation guidelines. It has proven itself through an established and enviable track record of secure operation. The CS 1000’s core architecture is designed to be secure. The CS 1000 core is based on hardened VxWorks O/S, a commercially available real-time operating system that historically has not been a target of attacks. The CS 1000 SIP application is based on LINUX, a hardened version used by Nortel carrier products, which is designed to prevent such attacks. Additional security capabilities have also been added by Nortel, such as: • An audit trail to report OS activities to determine root cause and respond to a potential DoS attack, • A watch dog process to restore potentially failed services, and thus minimize the impact of a potential DoS attack, • Enhanced memory management to optimize memory allocation to minimize the impact of a potential system attack. No system is secure if not implemented properly. Nortel has established well­ defined network design guidelines to assure secure operation and protection from DoS attacks. Several separate network segments must be deployed to assure protected and secure communication between distributed control elements of the system while still allowing client and application access to the system. Nortel has published guidelines for protections that must be implemented for the interconnection of these segments to the rest of the customer network. These guidelines can be met through off-the-shelf firewalls, access controls, or other commonly deployed network protection schemes, or the client can deploy a “Secure Multimedia Zone” using the Nortel Secure Multimedia Controller (SMC) 2450. The Nortel Secure Multimedia Controller (SMC) 2450, included within this proposal, provides a comprehensive approach to providing a “Secure Multimedia Zone” that protects business critical converged or multimedia infrastructure resources from internal attacks. The SMC 2450 is a transparent network appliance that provides DoS attack protection to the network segments surrounding the CS 1000 and its associated applications and services, creating the Secure Multimedia Zone The SMC 2450’s Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 26
  27. 27. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 capabilities include: • Stateful filtering and attack protection on traffic destined for the multimedia infrastructure, • Integrated configuration and management with simplified policies and QoS capabilities, • Stateful failover in case of a software or hardware failure, • Scalable security for low-end and high-end deployments including user proxy support and the ability to support crypto off-load, • Protection against common DoS attacks including rate limiting on signaling channels (Unistim, H.323 and SIP), • A mechanism for RTP media to traverse the SMC securely without opening a block hole of UDP ports, • Call signaling encryption for Nortel IP Phones (see next section). 1.6.4 Theft of Services Vendor Response Requirements Briefly describe any embedded features/functions in the proposed IPTS solution that will identify the incidence of toll fraud and other types of Long Distance toll service abuse/misuse (e.g. LD voice calls on fax lines) in real­ time, and alert and/or block such activity to reduce financial losses. Nortel Response: Incidences of toll fraud and other types of service abuse/misuse are monitored in real-time and may be alerted to security, administration or management. Telephone Abuse and Toll-Fraud Protection: The CS 1000 offers an extensive set of voice security features which control user privileges and access to voice services, including: • Class of Service assigns call origination and receiving privileges at the station and trunk level to control the degree of access to external networks and certain features within the system, • Trunk Group Access Restrictions control access for basic and network automatic route selection, • Access Restrictions limit terminal access to the exchange network, private network, and certain services and features. They can be temporarily overridden by the use of other features such as Forced Charge Account, Authorization Codes and System Speed Call, • Authorization Codes allow users to temporarily override access restrictions assigned to any station or trunk by dialing an authorization code. This allows user identification for billing, user Class of Service, and network access control, • Network Authorization Codes extend Authorization Code functionality to provide up to 20,000 codes used for accessing calls, routes, and features throughout a private network, • Station Specific Authorization Codes provide control of the level of authorization code access on a per telephone basis, • Forced Charge Accounts temporarily override Class of Service restrictions Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 27
  28. 28. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 for toll-denied users. FCA can, for example, allow and charge long distance calls to an account number when calling from a telephone that is restricted from making long distance calls. • Direct Inward System Access (DISA) uses a combination of security code and access code to authorize calling abilities, • Call Forward External Deny provides the option to restrict, on a per telephone basis, the directory number that can be programmed for Call Forward All Calls, • Malicious Call Trace provides information about a Malicious Call. Enhanced Malicious Call Trace allows a recording device to be conferenced with a Malicious Call. 1.6.5 Restricted Calls Vendor Response Requirements Briefly describe any embedded features/functions in the proposed IPTS that will identify telephony/fax spam, harassing calls, and other types of restricted calls (e.g. bomb threats, threatening calls, calls to/from restricted numbers) in real-time, and alert and/or block such activity to reduce damages and legal exposure. Nortel Response: Call Tracking is Nortel Telephony Manager's (TM) real time telephone call monitoring and alarm application. Its graphs indicate trends and provide displays of unusual calls enabling you to adjust your equipment and services to maximize your resources. Call Tracking monitors and displays information output from the CS 1000. It then accumulates the data and displays the information in different formats in its CDR displays. Call Tracking also provides alarm generating functions, which can be set up to warn you of unusual calling patterns. This is useful in the quick detection of unauthorized telephone calls that occur with toll fraud. You can define multiple alarm templates to detect different calling patterns, including calls exceeding certain durations, calls made at unusual times, and toll calls. Call Tracking can also be configured to output visual alarms or send to a log file on an external device such as a printer or network workstation. 1.6.6 Confidentiality and Privacy (Packet Sniffing) VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS solution provide for a high degree of confidentiality and privacy, including: • Support for standards such as IPSec, TLS, and SRTP. • Encryption for all public (to the LAN) traffic must be supported. This includes traffic exchanged between the call processor and media gateway. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 28
  29. 29. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Vendor Response Requirements Briefly described any embedded features/functions in the proposed IPTS that will preserve communications confidentiality and privacy, including the standards listed above. Indicate if control signaling and/or bearer communications signaling is encrypted at the call control, voice client, and media gateway elements to counter packet sniffing attempts: Nortel Response: The CS 1000 solution supports both encrypted media and encrypted call and intra- and inter-system signaling. Call media is secured using Secure RTP (sRTP) (RFC 3711). sRTP is supported in all 200x-series and 11xx-series Nortel IP Phones, and in the DSP resources installed in all Media Gateway 1000E units. This assures that secure calls can be made both between IP sets as well as between IP and TDM endpoints, such as PSTN trunks. The administrator can define encryption options such as forcing encryption always on or off. When an IP phone call is encrypted, an indication appears on the phone display to inform the user. Signaling between components of a single CS 1000 system (such as to secure a DSP channel and an outgoing PSTN trunk) is encrypted using natively embedded IPSec tunnels. Virtual trunk signaling between CS 1000 systems (such as setting up a call to a remote system) uses SIP TLS, with SDesc and MIKEY for key exchange. Additionally call signaling to and from Nortel IP Phones is encrypted using the SMC 2450 described in the previous section. The SMC 2450 defines the border of the Secure Multimedia Zone (SMZ). Services deployed within the SMZ enjoy enhanced DoS protection as all signaling and media traffic entering or leaving the SMZ must pass through the SMC 2450. The SMC 250 terminates the encrypted signaling to and from the IP phone and relays that signaling to and from the CS 1000. 1.6.7 Physical Interfaces Vendor Response Requirements Are there separate physical network interfaces to IPTS administration, control, and voice transmission signaling functions? Nortel Response: IPTS administration and control are both physically and logically separated from each other. IPTS administration access is via either serial ports or the Embedded LAN (ELAN) IP Ethernet interface. Voice signaling and media ingress / egress are via the Telephony LAN (TLAN) IP Ethernet interface. The ELAN and TLAN are both physically and logically separated. Nortel has established strongly-defined deployment guidelines, including the deployment of broadcast and multicast rate limitation and the user of physically or virtually separate LAN switching infrastructure to assure separation and protection of these interfaces (see section 1.6.2 for further discussion on the protection of these interfaces). Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 29
  30. 30. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 No access is possible within the system between these two interfaces. IP clients are deployed outside of any of these interface access LANs. 1.6.7 Root Access Vendor Response Requirements Is there direct Root access to the IPTS common control, and does the proposed IPTS solution conform to the following design attributes: • Disablement of non-secure management interfaces such as telnet by default. • No installation of any default administrative or root passwords. • Logging of all activity for administrative or root access. Nortel Response: Yes, Nortel provides direct Root access to the IPTS common control with authentication, password encryption, and account activity logging. Disablement of non-secure interfaces is possible and preferred but not enabled by default. The system by default petitions to change the default administrative and root passwords. CS 1000 does provide logging of all activity including administrative and root access. 1.6.9 Miscellaneous Security Requirements Vendor Response Requirements VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS solution provide the following general security features: • A patch management process and system must be available. • A secure alternative to TFTP (whose files can easily be sniffed) must be provided. • Support of TCP and authentication should be provided if SIP is supported. • Firmware loads for IPTS phones will be signed to insure authenticity. Vendor Response Requirements Confirm that the proposed IPTS solution satisfies each of the listed general security features: • Patch management • TFTP alternative • Signed firmware loads Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 30
  31. 31. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Nortel Response: Comply. Any security patches deemed to be applicable to all systems would be categorized as a GEN (generally applicable) or EMG (emergency) status to be publicly downloaded by all customers; as well as being delivered via the Dependency List for installation. The patch can be individually installed using cli commands or element manager; or installed via full dependency list or delta dependency list using cli command or in using element manager. Security patches are communicated to customers via product bulletins/alerts. The CS 1000 uses Unistim FTP as an alternative to TFTP. The CS 1000 is currently developing a signed firmware loads solution. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 31
  32. 32. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 2.0 IPTS Network Port Capacity Requirements The proposed IPTS must be capable of supporting port capacity requirements for the HQ facility and remote branches. It must also be capable of supporting future VoiceCon growth requirements at HQ and RO facilities. 2.1.0 Port Capacity Requirements The equipped port capacity of the proposed VoiceCon HQ IP Telephony System at time of installation and cutover must support of a mix of IP telephones, analog telephones, facsimile terminals, modems, central office trunk circuits (analog and digital) for local and long distance services, and private network IP trunk circuits). In support of general communications requirements, VoiceCon facilities will have a sufficient number of wiring closets distributed throughout each facility to satisfy ANSI/EAI/TIA 569 structured cabling specifications for voice and data communications. Wiring closets will be interconnected based on requirements of the selected system. The entrance facility (trunk connect panel), main telecom equipment room, and Main Distribution Frame (MDF) for each facility are located off the entrance lobby. It will be the responsibility of the contractor to provide all cross connects between labeled 110 terminal blocks in each wiring closet and the demarc or "smart jack" and their equipment. The following sections describe the port capacity requirements for each of the VoiceCon network locations. Satisfying these stated port capacity requirements is a MANDATORY requirement 2.1.1 CHQ Facility The CHQ campus includes two buildings, each a four-floor facility, with station equipment uniformly distributed within and across the four floors of the building. There are five (5) wiring closets per floor and one (1) main equipment room on the first floor of each building. 2.1.2 RO Facility The RO facility has two floors with station equipment uniformly distributed within and across each floor of the building. There are five (5) wiring closets per floor and one (1) main equipment room on the first floor. 2.1.3 SO Facility The SO facility has one floor with uniformly distributed station equipment across building. There are two (2) wiring closets and one (1) main equipment room. 2.2 Port Requirements Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 32
  33. 33. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 VoiceCon requires that the proposed IPTS communications solution be designed to support the following equipped port capacity requirements in the following tables with wired capacity for 50% growth. The definition of “equipped capacity” is all necessary system hardware and software components installed and working at time of initial system installation based on the stated requirements of this RFP. The definition of “wired for capacity” is the capability for system expansion (call processing, switched connections, and port capacity) with the addition of port interface cards or media gateway boards, only. VoiceCon will engineer its WAN trunk circuits to support compressed voice traffic (G.729A algorithm voice codecs) across its facilities. In addition to the following trunk circuit requirements any additional trunk services necessary to support the proposed IPTS, e.g., local survivability requirements, must be identified, configured, and included in the pricing proposal. Necessary common equipment must be included in the system configuration and pricing proposals and identified as such. 2.2.1 CHQ Station/Trunk Port Requirements 2.2.1.1 CHQ Building 1 Station Equipment • Analog devices (VoiceCon provided): 75 o 2500-type telephone instruments: 55 o Modems: 15 o Facsimile terminals: 5 • IP terminals (See Section 4) 675 o Economy desktop instrument 25 o Administrative desktop instrument 50 o Professional desktop instrument 425 o Executive desktop instrument 75 o ACD agent/supervisor telephone instrument 75 o Attendant soft consoles 3 o Audio conferencing units 22 Trunk Circuits • Local Service o GS/LS circuits 48 o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 3 • Long Distance o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 2 • Inbound ACD o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 4 2.2.1.2 CHQ Building 2 Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 33
  34. 34. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Station Equipment • Analog devices (VoiceCon provided): 50 o 2500-type telephone instruments: 35 o Modems: 10 o Facsimile terminals: 5 • IP terminals (See Section 4) 450 o Economy desktop instrument 25 o Administrative desktop instrument 25 o Professional desktop instrument 300 o Executive desktop instrument 35 o ACD agent/supervisor telephone instrument 50 o Attendant soft consoles 3 o Audio conferencing units 12 Trunk Circuits • Local Service o GS/LS circuits 32 o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 2 • Long Distance o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 2 • Inbound ACD o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 3 2.2.2 RO Station/Trunk Port Requirements Station Equipment • Analog devices (VoiceCon provided): 25 o 2500-type telephone instruments: 15 o Modems: 5 o Facsimile terminals: 5 • IP terminals (See Section 4) 175 o Economy desktop instrument 15 o Administrative desktop instrument 15 o Professional desktop instrument 120 o Executive desktop instrument 15 o Attendant soft consoles 2 o Audio conferencing units 8 Trunk Circuits • Local Service o GS/LS circuits 8 o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 1 • Long Distance o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 1 2.2.3 SO Station/Trunk Port Requirements Station Equipment Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 34
  35. 35. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 • Analog devices (VoiceCon provided): 5 o 2500-type telephone instruments: 3 o Modems: 3 o Facsimile terminals: 2 • IP terminals (See Section 4) 45 o Economy desktop instrument 5 o Administrative desktop instrument 5 o Professional desktop instrument 25 o Executive desktop instrument 5 o Attendant soft consoles 0 o Audio conferencing units 5 Trunk Circuits • Local Service o GS/LS circuits 8 o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 0 • Long Distance o T1-carrier (PRI) circuits 0 Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 35
  36. 36. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 3.0 Port Interface and Traffic Handling Requirements The proposed IPTS must support a variety of peripheral ports and switched connections. In addition to IP endpoints it is required to support traditional circuit switched analog stations and analog & digital trunk circuit interfaces. The common equipment (port interface carriers, media gateways) must be supported in a distributed topology using VoiceCon’s LAN/WAN for transmission and switching of communications and control signaling. Common equipment must be located at CHQ, RO, and SO facilities. Any and all port interface cabinets/carriers designed to support traditional analog and digital interface ports should include an integrated TDM bus backplane traffic engineered to support non-blocking switch network access for all peripheral endpoint connections. Transmission and connections between all TDM buses must also be traffic engineered to operate in non­ blocking mode. A center stage switch network, if equipped, must also be traffic engineered for non-blocking access. Media gateway equipment should be designed and configured to support a 4:1 ratio between IP peripheral endpoints (line station and trunk circuit) and media gateway channels used to connect to non-IP ports. For common equipment configuration design purposes assume the following voice communications traffic volumes: User line station (analog and IP) 12 CCS at busy hour Attendant console position 36 CCS at busy hour ACD/Supervisor call center agents 36 CCS at busy hour Voice mail port traffic 36 CCS at busy hour All trunk circuit traffic 36 CCS at busy hour The assumed system voice communications traffic mix should be 40% station to station calls, 30% incoming trunk calls, 30% outgoing trunk calls. Vendor Response Requirement: The proposed system IPTS be designed and engineered to support the above traffic assumptions. Confirm you have satisfied this requirement. Nortel Response: Comply. 3.1 Common Equipment The proposed IPTS solution must support a variety of peripheral ports and switched connections. Although it is not required to support traditional digital voice terminal equipment, the IPTS must support analog communications devices and PSTN trunk circuits. Switched connections Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 36
  37. 37. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 involving non-IP ports may be handled using a circuit switched network, media gateways/Ethernet switches, or a combination of both. Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly identify by make/model the proposed common equipment and describe each type of equipment housing used to support ports, circuit card interfaces, media gateway boards, and other required equipment. Specifically discuss in the response housing size (H x L x W), weight (standard common assembly), fan cooling units, power supply requirements, heat dissipation levels (BTUs), and number of usable port card slots per carrier/chassis. Nortel Response: The CS 1000E proposed supports all interface cards within the Media Gateway chassis. These chassis are connected and distributed across an IP network. A media gateway chassis (MG 1000E) can be comprised of two chassis: A main chassis and an expander. Each chassis is physically the same size (19” wide x 5 units high) and each weighs approximately 30 lbs. Heat dissipation levels would depend on the specific configuration of each chassis and the interface cards contained within. However see the table below for both worst case and typical values for both the main and expander chassis. Both chassis are forced-air cooled with internal fans. Both chassis are AC-powered (120/240V). Each chassis/expander combo has 8 universal card slots. Each chassis can accommodate digital and analog line cards, digital and analog trunk cards, application cards, media cards, call processing and signaling cards. Up to 50 MG 1000E chassis pairs (main and expander) can be equipped in a single CS 1000E system, providing up to 400 card slots maximum. Component Thermal Dissipation Thermal Dissipation (Typical BTUs) (Maximum BTUs) MG 1000E PRI Gateway 480.0 1023.60 Main Media Gateway 648.30 1023.60 Chassis Expander Media 494.70 1023.60 Gateway Chassis 3.1.1 Universal Card Slots VoiceCon prefers that the proposed common equipment be based on a universal card slot design for all TDM port interface circuit cards. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that your proposed system satisfies this requirement. Nortel Response: Comply 3.1.2 Common Equipment Redundancy Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 37
  38. 38. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 VoiceCon requires an IPTS that satisfies a very high degree of reliability and services availability. To achieve this goal IPTS common equipment should include a significant number of redundant design elements to minimize the affects of single points of failure. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm if the proposed common equipment includes any or all of the following redundant common equipment elements, and include a brief description of the level or type of redundancy provided for each element. • Service circuits • I/O interfaces • Media gateway boards • Control signaling interfaces • TDM bus backplane • Inter-TDM bus switch network connections • Center stage switch network (if applicable) • Internal power supply Nortel Response: The CS 1000 provides the following redundant common equipment addressed above: The CS 1000 solution provides redundant and load balanced service circuits via the Media Gateway Controller (MGC) cards. The CS 1000 provides redundant I/O interfaces via IP or serial ports, for the purposes of management. Media gateway cards are equipped in a redundant load balanced configuration. The CS 1000 has redundant control signaling interfaces on call processors and signaling processors. TDM bus backplane redundancies can be provided by implementation of redundant MG 1000E gateways. However media gateways with TDM backplanes have a proven MTBF of over 37 years. Inter-TDM bus switch network connections are provided over redundant media gateway controller interfaces. Center stage switch network connections are provided over redundant media gateway controller interfaces. 3.2.1 IP Station Discovery How do IP communications devices learn about their voice VLAN, including IP Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 38
  39. 39. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 addresses, default gateways, call controller, TFTP server, QoS settings, VLANs, and other parameters. Does the proposed system solution employ proprietary protocols for IP communications devices to learn their voice VLAN or is an industry standard, such as Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP) used? Nortel Response: Industry standards are employed to provide IP station discovery mechanisms. Nortel supports DHCP Options for the configuration of VLAN as well as IP addresses, gateway call server settings. Additionally, Nortel phones support VLAN configuration via the industry standard 802.1ab protocol. QoS parameters are delivered to the IP telephone during the registration process once the phone is identified to the call server. Any changes to QoS parameters after set registration are automatically pushed to the device and updated in a non­ disruptive way. 3.2.2 IP Station Power over Ethernet (PoE) VoiceCon requires that the power option to support IP telephones conform to IEEE 802.3af Power over Ethernet (PoE) standards. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that the proposed IPTS solution supports the IEEE 802.3af specification for in-line of IP telephone equipment. Describe current, future and retrospective compatibility of all proposed equipment. If 802.3af is not supported, identify the PoE implementation being proposed. Nortel Response: Nortel complies with the current 802.3af Power over Ethernet (PoE) standards for all IP Phone models. 3.2.3 IP Station QoS Vendor Response Requirement: Describe the proposed IPTS solution’s capabilities to provide Layer 2 and Layer 3 QoS to IP stations to ensuring end-to-end quality of service. Include in the response what industry standards are deployed. Nortel Response: Nortel supports 802.1p and 802.1q for both the signaling and bearer paths at Layer 2 as well as Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) for Layer 3 control of QoS. These configuration options are distributed to the IP Telephone during the registration process with the Telephone Proxy Server embedded within the solution. Any changes to the QoS settings that may take place after registration are immediately pushed to the IP Telephones during the next available idle call cycle. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 39
  40. 40. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 3.3 Multi-Party Conference Calls The proposed system must be able to support six party add-on conference calls among IPTS stations and off-network stations. The system must also support a minimum of three (3) off-network stations per multi-party conference call when required. The HQ IPTS must support a minimum of 20 simultaneous multi-party add-on conference calls (up to six parties per conference) and the RO IPTS a minimum of 10 simultaneous multi-party add­ on conference calls (up to six parties per conference) Vendor Response Requirement: Briefly explain how multi-party add-on conference calls are handled if: 1) All parties are on-network IP stations; 2) There is a mix of on-network IP and off-network stations. The explanation should identify any and all hardware and software requirements necessary to support multi-party add-on conference call requirements. Specify if peripheral hardware equipment, e.g., conference bridge servers, is required. Nortel Response: In a multi-party on-network IP station or mix of an on-network IP and off­ network station conference, the conference connections are maintained by the CS 1000 Conference/Tone and Digit Switch resources located in the Media Gateway Controller. The initiation of the conference feature is controlled by a telephone class of service option. Add-on (ad-hoc) conferencing is possible with up to 6 or more parties. Conference size is limited only by the conference resources that are available system wide. 3.4 VoIP Overflow Traffic If available WAN circuits connecting the HQ, RO and all SB facilities are busy, call admission control levels are reached, or QoS levels are not satisfied on­ network voice traffic must be able to automatically overflow to PSTN trunk circuits. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm that your proposed communications system supports overflow of voice traffic across VoiceCon locations if WAN links are not available or conditions are not acceptable. Also indicate if overflow traffic can revert back to the WAN if conditions permit. Nortel Response: Comply. Nortel’s Proactive Voice Quality Management (PVQM) and Adaptive Bandwidth Management (ABWM) features ensure our proposed solution supports overflow of voice traffic if WAN links are not available or conditions are not acceptable. Overflow traffic will automatically revert back to the WAN when defined network quality criteria are met. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 40
  41. 41. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 3.5.0 Port Interface Circuit Cards For each of the following port types, provide a brief description of the proposed port interface circuit card(s) and/or media gateway equipment included with the proposed IPTS to support analog, digital, and IP ports. Include in the descriptions below the number of port interface terminations for each port circuit card, and the number of available gateway channels for each media gateway unit. 3.5.1 IP Telephones (desktop instrument and PC client softphones, including Attendant Console Position) & IP Audioconferencing Units Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description how all IP telephone types are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server. If direct call control signaling via the Ethernet LAN/WAN is not supported identify all intermediary carrier, signaling interface and/or media gateway equipment that is required. Nortel Response: IP phones are supported directly via the Ethernet LAN/WAN off the call processors of the CS 1000E, specifically by the IP Line application which operates on the CS 1000 Signaling Server. The Signaling Server IP Line application provides a Terminal Proxy Server (TPS) which represents the virtual ports of each IP phone to the common call control logic housed in the CS 1000 call servers. The TPS then provides all downstream signaling to the IP phones. This architecture allows the CS 1000 call server to treat IP phones in the same manner as TDM phones and thus provides feature transparency and media flexibility to the user. When calls are made between two IP phones, media is direct between the phones, assuring optimal network routing, even when they span multiple systems. Only the signaling follows the path through the Signaling Server and Call Server. When calls are made between an IP phone and a TDM device, the Call Server signals the appropriate media gateway to seize a DSP channel for the IP portion of the call, to set up the TDM portion of the call, and ultimately link those two portions together. IP phones are physically supported off any standard RJ-45 Ethernet port providing adequate network services. No specific vendor’s data networking equipment is required to support Nortel IP phones. The phones can be configured manually (IP address, VLAN, call server address, application server address, etcetera) or automatically. 3.5.2 Analog telephones Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description how analog telephones are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 41
  42. 42. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: The Call Servers provide connectivity to telephony devices using IP signaling through the media gateways (MG 1000Es). The Call Server uses a proprietary protocol to control the MG 1000Es. This proprietary protocol is similar to industry-standard Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP) or H.248 Gateways. The Call Servers can control up to 50 MG 1000Es, each MG supports up to 8 universal card slots which can house Analog Message Waiting Line Cards that support 16 analog ports. The Call Servers communicate with the MG 1000E media gateways and Analog Message Waiting Line Cards over the Embedded LAN (ELAN). The ELAN subnet (100BaseT, full-duplex) is used to manage signaling traffic between the Call Server, Signaling Server, and MG 1000Es. 3.5.3 Facsimile terminal Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description how facsimile terminals are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: Please see the response in question 3.5.2. Fax machines are supported by 16­ port analog line cards located in the Media Gateways. The proposed CS 1000E supports IP Peer Networking which leverages the voice-to-fax switchover protocol for T.38 Fax, by using the mode select signaling in H.323. 3.5.4. Modem Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description how modem terminals are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: Nortel can terminate modem terminals as user or maintenance equipment on analog line cards, BRI interface cards, and maintenance ports. Given the variability of IP networks and the issues created by packet loss for modems; it is recommended that modem traffic be sent directly over circuit­ switched PSTN trunks. Otherwise response to section 3.5.2 is applicable. 3.5.5 Power Failure Transfer Station (PFTS) Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 42
  43. 43. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description how analog telephone instrument Power Failure Transfer Stations (PFTSs) are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: Power Fail Transfer Stations are controlled by 3rd party (Gordon Kapes Inc). These units connect eight analog trunks to eight analog stations at the main distribution frame in the event of a power failure and loss of battery backup on the Communication Server to provide direct access to the trunks by the stations. 3.5.6 GS/LS CO Trunk Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description how GS/LS CO trunk circuits are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: Ground Start / Loop Start trunk circuits are supported on software­ programmable Universal Trunk Cards. Each card can support a multitude of trunk types and has 8 physical ports. The Universal Trunk Card can be inserted into any Media Gateway universal card slot. Please see the response to question 3.5.2 for description of logical and physical connectivity for common control signaling. 3.2.7 DS1/T-1 Carrier Interface Trunk Vendor Response Requirement: Provide brief description how DS1-based T-1 carrier trunk circuits are logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: In the CS 1000E, there are now two alternatives for T1 support. The first alternative is a single slot Digital Trunk Interface Card inserted into the MG 1000E. Each card is capable of supporting one DS1 T1 circuit. Up to 4 Digital Trunk Interface Cards maybe installed per MG 1000E. The second alternative is a high-density PRI Gateway is capable of expanding up to 8 E1 or T1 spans in a small footprint. The PRI Media Gateway uses one downloadable D-channel daughterboard to serve two E1/T1 spans. Each of the E1/T1 spans in the PRI Gateway can be configured as E1 or T1. Additionally, multi-country E1/T1 ISDN protocols can be configured for each span and each Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 43
  44. 44. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 E1/T1 span can be configured with any PRI protocol variant or interface type, for example, DPNSS, Euro ISDN, NI2, and MCDN. Please see the response to question 3.5.2 for description of logical and physical connectivity for common control signaling. 3.2.8 Other Trunk Interfaces VoiceCon may need at some future time additional analog trunk interfaces, specifically Auxiliary, FX, and E&M Tie Line. Vendor Response Requirement: Provide a brief description of how additional analog trunk interface requirements can be logically and physically supported by the common control call telephony server, identifying all intermediary hardware elements necessary for control signaling transmission. Specify the number of circuit terminations per circuit board/module/media gateway. Nortel Response: Analog trunk requirements such as Central Office, FX, DID, Loop Dial Repeating, Recorded Announcement, and Paging trunks can be accommodated with the Universal Trunk Card. The universal trunk card is a single-slot card and provides 8 analog trunk terminations. The card can be located in any slot of a media gateway (MG 1000E). Analog 2-wire and 4-wire E&M trunks and 4-wire DX trunks are provisioned with an E&M trunk card, which has 4 trunk terminations. Up to 8 analog E&M trunks or FX trunks maybe installed per MG 1000E. For control signaling transmission see the response to question 3.5.2. Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 44
  45. 45. Nortel Response to VoiceCon RFP 2008 4.0.0. Voice Terminal Instruments The proposed communications system must be able to support a mix of analog and IP communications devices. VoiceCon will provide its own analog telephone instruments, fax terminals, and modems. 4.1 Regulation Requirements All single- and multi-line IP phones will be manufactured in accordance with Federal Communication Commission hearing aid compatibility technical standards contained in Section 68.316 and the Telecommunication Act of 1996. Vendor Response Requirement: Confirm the proposed telephone equipment satisfies these regulation requirements Nortel Response Comply. The proposed equipment is compliant with the FCC hearing and compatibility technical standards contained in Section 68.316 and the Telecommunications Act of 1996. 4.2 Desktop IP Telephone Instruments VoiceCon has a requirement for several types of desktop IP telephone instruments: • Economy • Administrative • Professional • Executive Vendor Response Requirement: In a separate PPT file attachment provide a slide illustration (graphic or photograph) of the four proposed desktop IP telephone instruments with models identified. Include in the illustration any add-on modules required to satisfy the individual model requirements. 4.2.1 Economy Desktop IP Telephone Instrument A single line Economy model will be used in common areas. It should have, at minimum, the following design attributes and features/functions: • 12-key dial pad • Hold button • G.711/G.729 voice codecs • Auto Self Discovery/DHCP • QoS Support (802.1p/Q, DiffServ) Copyright © 2007 TEQConsult Group 45

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