Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
March 2014
Diversity in the Economy and Local Integration (DELI)
context & concepts
SUPPORT TO
MIGRANT-OWNED
BUSINNESSES
Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (I)
20 000
40 000
60 000
80 000
100 000
120 000
1998-2000 2001-2003 2004-2006 2007-...
Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (II)
Because more migrant-owned businesses means more jobs for all:
100
200
300
400...
Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (III)
Because migrant-owned businesses have a decisive impact on the
local economy:...
Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (IV)
• Because helping immigrants to fulfil their business aspirations and
to be pa...
Support migrant-owned businnesses: how
• Mapping and needs assessment of immigrant entrepreneurs
• Support from leadership...
SUPPLIER DIVERSITY
‘Supplier diversity’ is the proactive activity undertaken
by purchasing organisations to ensure that all relevant,
potenti...
Supplier diversity…
• …addresses inequalities in visibility and access to information
• …seeks to ensure that all business...
Supplier diversity: benefits for cities (I)
From a socio-economic perspective:
• It helps to bring economic growth to depr...
From a procurement perspective:
• Migrant suppliers’ knowledge about their communities; they are well-placed to
appreciate...
Supplier diversity: benefits for the private sector
• It aligns supply chains, products and services with increasingly div...
• Migrant businesses often lack the relevant information and capacity to bid for
public or private sector contracts.
• The...
DIVERSITY &
EQUALITY CLAUSES IN
PUBLIC CONTRACTS
Public procurement – why should we care? (I)
Thresholds – EU rules & national rules
Public procurement globally accounts f...
Public procurement – why should we care?
Buying goods and services in a socially
responsible way is a democratic duty for ...
Using social clauses…
‘Social clauses’ require contractors to employ persons who are in a
disadvantaged position on the la...
…and diversity and equality clauses
Diversity and equality clauses require contractors to change
their employment practice...
Thank you for your attention
www.migpolgroup.com
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Diversity in the Economy and Local Integration (DELI) - the context

1,549 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Diversity in the Economy and Local Integration (DELI) - the context

  1. 1. March 2014 Diversity in the Economy and Local Integration (DELI) context & concepts
  2. 2. SUPPORT TO MIGRANT-OWNED BUSINNESSES
  3. 3. Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (I) 20 000 40 000 60 000 80 000 100 000 120 000 1998-2000 2001-2003 2004-2006 2007-2008 Average yearly number of new entrepreneurs, foreign-born, 1998-2008 - OECD Austria France Germany Italy Netherlands Spain Sweden United Kingdom Because more and more migrants create businesses:
  4. 4. Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (II) Because more migrant-owned businesses means more jobs for all: 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 1998-2000 2001-2003 2004-2006 2007-2008 Persons employed in firms of immigrant entrepreneurs, 1998-2008, thousands - OECD Austria France Germany Italy Netherlands Spain Sweden United Kingdom
  5. 5. Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (III) Because migrant-owned businesses have a decisive impact on the local economy: Companies with a migrant background make up 30% of the local economy in Vienna In Munich, there are over 12,000 immigrant-run businesses that have resulted in the employment of over 100,000 people from all sectors of life Not just ‘pizza & kebabs’: immigrant entrepreneurs work in ICT, consultancies, transport, financial services, etc.
  6. 6. Why support migrant-owned businnesses? (IV) • Because helping immigrants to fulfil their business aspirations and to be part of the mainstream economy fosters their social and cultural integration; strengthens their potential to contribute to democratic life in society as active citizens; and provides inspiring role-models to future generations. • Because setting the conditions for entrepreneurship to strive among immigrant communities help to make cities more open and dynamic and strengthens their international outlook.
  7. 7. Support migrant-owned businnesses: how • Mapping and needs assessment of immigrant entrepreneurs • Support from leadership and inter-departmental work for immigrant entrepreneurs • Services offered by a business support centre (coaching, financing, mentoring, training etc), including their monitoring and evaluation • Cooperation with external stakeholders • Recognition of immigrant entrepreneurs (awards, prizes, etc), including role-model activities
  8. 8. SUPPLIER DIVERSITY
  9. 9. ‘Supplier diversity’ is the proactive activity undertaken by purchasing organisations to ensure that all relevant, potential suppliers, including immigrant entrepreneurs, have the fair and equal opportunity to compete for business within their supply chains. Supplier diversity is not about preferential treatment or quotas. Introducing ‘supplier diversity’
  10. 10. Supplier diversity… • …addresses inequalities in visibility and access to information • …seeks to ensure that all businesses have free and fair opportunity to compete for places in a supply chain. • …includes but is not limited to micro and small migrant-owned businesses:  A migrant-owned business is an independent business that is at least  51% owned and controlled by one or more migrants; and whose management and  Daily operation is controlled by one or more of the migrant owners  A micro business is comprised of less than 10 employees  A small business is comprised of less than 50 employees
  11. 11. Supplier diversity: benefits for cities (I) From a socio-economic perspective: • It helps to bring economic growth to deprived areas • It provides economic opportunities to the migrant population • It builds harmonious communities through social inclusion • It creates good public relations for municipalities (as a large employer in an area) and demonstrates investment in the migrant community – as an economic asset rather than a drag on public provisions.
  12. 12. From a procurement perspective: • Migrant suppliers’ knowledge about their communities; they are well-placed to appreciate and satisfy their community’s preferences -this is particularly relevant where specialised products and services are concerned • It creates a wider candidate pool brings wider choices which brings access to innovation and flexibility into supply chains • It aligns supply chains, products and services with increasingly diverse communities and service users • It extends workforce equalities and diversity activity to the supply chain • It stands as a tangible example of Social Return on Investment Supplier diversity: benefits for cities (II)
  13. 13. Supplier diversity: benefits for the private sector • It aligns supply chains, products and services with increasingly diverse consumers and potential clients • It creates a wider candidate pool which provides wider choices which in turn brings access to innovation and flexibility into supply chains • It extends workforce equalities and diversity activity to the supply chain • It mitigates reputational risk and enhances reputation • It stands as a tangible example of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) • It supports EU and national legislation on anti discrimination, equality and diversity policies and internal equality and diversity policies • Public sector clients may require private sector suppliers to push certain social obligations through their supply chains e.g. social issues, equalities and sustainability • The local knowledge of migrant suppliers about their communities means that they are well-placed to appreciate and satisfy existing and potential customer needs
  14. 14. • Migrant businesses often lack the relevant information and capacity to bid for public or private sector contracts. • There is a lack of awareness among large purchasing organisations, including public sector organisations, of the potential migrant-owned supplier base and an inability of these businesses to identify and exploit opportunities in mainstream corporate and consumer markets. • There is a perception among established migrant entrepreneurs that contract opportunities are not being made available to them even though they have the capability to deliver contracts Supplier diversity: benefits for migrant businesses
  15. 15. DIVERSITY & EQUALITY CLAUSES IN PUBLIC CONTRACTS
  16. 16. Public procurement – why should we care? (I) Thresholds – EU rules & national rules Public procurement globally accounts for about 17% of EU GDP - a sum equivalent to half the GDP of Germany Local authorities issue 30% of procurement notices that fall under EU rules
  17. 17. Public procurement – why should we care? Buying goods and services in a socially responsible way is a democratic duty for public authorities. People expect governments to spend public money in a way that serves the public good, particularly at times of economic crisis.
  18. 18. Using social clauses… ‘Social clauses’ require contractors to employ persons who are in a disadvantaged position on the labour market. • No EU statistics on socially responsible procurement. • In France, social clauses are included in 4.3% of public contracts above 90K€ in 2012, up from 1.9% in 2009. Local authorities are in the lead: 7.3% of their contracts include a social clause.
  19. 19. …and diversity and equality clauses Diversity and equality clauses require contractors to change their employment practices and to develop diversity and equality policies that prevent discrimination and promote equal opportunities.
  20. 20. Thank you for your attention www.migpolgroup.com

×