Young & Pregnant
Delivering antenatal education to young
pregnant & Maori mums
Problem
 Despite providing specialist antenatal
classes for Young Mums & Maori
mums in Marlborough, New Zealand
attendanc...
Marlborough
Pregnancy Rates
 Overall teenage pregnancy rates for
Marlborough are not available
 NZ numbers there were 7639 New
Zeala...
Pregnancy Rates - Maori
 Maori women less likely to have an
abortion (Dickson et al, 2000)
 teenage pregnancy is more co...
Reasons for non attendance in
Young Mums
 Feeling judged, by older mums &
Health Professionals
 Feeling bored
 Feeling ...
Reasons why Maori Mums don’t
attend
 Not culturally appropriate
 The word ‘ante’ sounded negative
 Whanau (family) excl...
Culture-So what?
 “An individuals cultural background
will impact how one best learns and
integrates new information” (Be...
Issues to consider
 Parents to be from Maori background
dislike being put on the spot with
group activities
 Maori like ...
Factors during antenatal care
which affect class attendance
 Often they describe Health
Professionals “do stuff to them”
...
Learning Needs
 “Prenatal Programs are often
designed and infused with content
from the viewpoint of the health
professio...
Health Board
 The health board decides what is to
be covered during the classes
 This goes against New Zealand’s
foundin...
My changes
 To work in partnership with Maori and
young mums
 Identify strategies to deliver antenatal
education
New strategies/blended learning
 Young couples prefer to attend
classes in traditional format
“Classes are of limited rea...
Alternate Channels
 Drop in sessions
 Text messaging
 Email
 YouTube video
 Developing sessions from early
pregnancy
...
Drop in Sessions
 Weekly 2hr session informal session
group discussion
 See what subjects arise in the session
 Young m...
Factors for drop in
 Safe environment
 Informal setting
 Couches, coffee & soft drinks
 They problem share
 Work toge...
Text messaging
 Negotiated a deal with local text
messaging service provider
 Delivery of compact educational
messages i...
Examples of text messages
 Healthy eating messages
 Safe exercise messages
 Signs of labour messages
 Danger signs dur...
Email
 Could be specifically designed and
targeted to each individual member
 Could be made culturally specific for
Maor...
Te Whare Tangata
The wahine (woman) is acknowledged,
protected, nurtured and respected as
Te Whare Tangata (the house of t...
Added advantages
 Maori and young mums often used
extended families computers to gain
access to computers which meant
oth...
YouTube video
 I made educational YouTube video’s
 Accessed easily
 From own home
 Information without intimidation
 ...
Facebook
 Development of facebook group
 More youngsters use facebook to
connect
 Wider network of support
 Country wi...
Blogging
 All information accessed on one easy
page
 Allows for participation through leaving
of comments
 Allows partn...
Difficulties for facilitator
 Needs creative thinking
 Organised with who is using what
method and where information sha...
Difficulties
 Need to develop knowledge of web
2.0 e.g YouTube & Blip TV
 Mobile phone sharing common for
young Maori mu...
Trusting drop in sessions
 Must have ability to allow control of
these sessions to rest with Young
mums themselves
 Be p...
Using Social Media
 Remember not confidential
 Not appropriate for personal
discussion of problems
 Gain consent from a...
Feedback
 Still collecting feedback and collecting
data
 Positive for facilitator and participants
sad when facilitator ...
Final Fact
“Studies show that teenage pregnancy
significantly drops off after the age of
25”
(Colorado Springs Local newsp...
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Young & pregnant c&n conference

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Presentation to Childbirth Educators Conference
October 2010

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Young & pregnant c&n conference

  1. 1. Young & Pregnant Delivering antenatal education to young pregnant & Maori mums
  2. 2. Problem  Despite providing specialist antenatal classes for Young Mums & Maori mums in Marlborough, New Zealand attendance at these classes are poor.  This led to examining the reasons why and what measures could be implemented to reach a vulnerable pregnant population with antenatal education
  3. 3. Marlborough
  4. 4. Pregnancy Rates  Overall teenage pregnancy rates for Marlborough are not available  NZ numbers there were 7639 New Zealand teenagers who had children in 2009  39 teenagers were under the age of 15
  5. 5. Pregnancy Rates - Maori  Maori women less likely to have an abortion (Dickson et al, 2000)  teenage pregnancy is more common among Maori women.  In1998 the fertility rate for Maori females aged 13-17 years was 26.2 per 1,000, more than five times that of non-Maori (4.9 per 1,000).  A study by Fenwick and Purdie 2000 showed that Maori students were nearly 3 times as likely as European students to be sexually active.
  6. 6. Reasons for non attendance in Young Mums  Feeling judged, by older mums & Health Professionals  Feeling bored  Feeling labelled  Sounded just like school  Transport difficulties  Not given same service as other mums so why should antenatal class be different
  7. 7. Reasons why Maori Mums don’t attend  Not culturally appropriate  The word ‘ante’ sounded negative  Whanau (family) excluded from classes  All support for pregnancy gained from Whanau (family) so antenatal class not valued  Again not given same service as white middle class women so why should classes be any different?  Shy of attending large groups
  8. 8. Culture-So what?  “An individuals cultural background will impact how one best learns and integrates new information” (Berman, 2006)
  9. 9. Issues to consider  Parents to be from Maori background dislike being put on the spot with group activities  Maori like to take information back to the Whanau (family) then come back with questions  Can be very, very quiet and shy  Maori children are brought up not to ask questions or challenge teachers
  10. 10. Factors during antenatal care which affect class attendance  Often they describe Health Professionals “do stuff to them”  They are not given informed choice  They feel they get a substandard service  Midwives & Obstetricians seem to be trying to ‘parent’ them through the system
  11. 11. Learning Needs  “Prenatal Programs are often designed and infused with content from the viewpoint of the health professional. Yet providers and receivers are vastly different in their views” (Berman, 2006)
  12. 12. Health Board  The health board decides what is to be covered during the classes  This goes against New Zealand’s founding document ignoring the promises of, Protection, Partnership & Participation for Maori
  13. 13. My changes  To work in partnership with Maori and young mums  Identify strategies to deliver antenatal education
  14. 14. New strategies/blended learning  Young couples prefer to attend classes in traditional format “Classes are of limited reach” (Renkert & Nutbeam, 2001) So alternate channels for delivery should be explored and tested
  15. 15. Alternate Channels  Drop in sessions  Text messaging  Email  YouTube video  Developing sessions from early pregnancy  Facebook  Blogging
  16. 16. Drop in Sessions  Weekly 2hr session informal session group discussion  See what subjects arise in the session  Young mums in total control  As an educator I just facilitate  I do not control  Allow young mums an empowerment opportunity
  17. 17. Factors for drop in  Safe environment  Informal setting  Couches, coffee & soft drinks  They problem share  Work together for solutions  Oral sharing of information (culturally more appropriate for Maori)  I sit in background only interject when silence or questions cannot be answered amongst themselves
  18. 18. Text messaging  Negotiated a deal with local text messaging service provider  Delivery of compact educational messages in 160 characters
  19. 19. Examples of text messages  Healthy eating messages  Safe exercise messages  Signs of labour messages  Danger signs during pregnancy  Safe baby sleeping message, “Face up, Face clear and Hands Free”
  20. 20. Email  Could be specifically designed and targeted to each individual member  Could be made culturally specific for Maori without excluding European participants. Turanga Kaupapa – the cultural guidelines for Maori pregnancy
  21. 21. Te Whare Tangata The wahine (woman) is acknowledged, protected, nurtured and respected as Te Whare Tangata (the house of the people)
  22. 22. Added advantages  Maori and young mums often used extended families computers to gain access to computers which meant others received same information and were able to ask questions
  23. 23. YouTube video  I made educational YouTube video’s  Accessed easily  From own home  Information without intimidation  Stop at any time  Watch over and over again  Can be accessed by young mums in rural areas
  24. 24. Facebook  Development of facebook group  More youngsters use facebook to connect  Wider network of support  Country wide  Discussion and ability to monitor and facilitate correct information sharing
  25. 25. Blogging  All information accessed on one easy page  Allows for participation through leaving of comments  Allows partnership when they suggest topics or can even contribute their own stories  Allows for protection by giving correct information
  26. 26. Difficulties for facilitator  Needs creative thinking  Organised with who is using what method and where information sharing is up to  Time consuming making videos  Steep learning curve with video editing software  Dependent on young mum’s access to internet, download speeds & data allowance
  27. 27. Difficulties  Need to develop knowledge of web 2.0 e.g YouTube & Blip TV  Mobile phone sharing common for young Maori mums so who is getting the text messages?  Inaccuracy of mobile phone numbers – Young people often change phones during pregnancy
  28. 28. Trusting drop in sessions  Must have ability to allow control of these sessions to rest with Young mums themselves  Be prepared and confident in own ability to present on any subject as and when they decide it needs to be covered
  29. 29. Using Social Media  Remember not confidential  Not appropriate for personal discussion of problems  Gain consent from all members for publishing photographs & video  Monitoring of comments at all times on the page
  30. 30. Feedback  Still collecting feedback and collecting data  Positive for facilitator and participants sad when facilitator left New Zealand
  31. 31. Final Fact “Studies show that teenage pregnancy significantly drops off after the age of 25” (Colorado Springs Local newspaper, 1999)

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