Developing A Survey Instrument

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This slide deck describes the types of B2B surveys, what to think about when writing questions and how to use the data to generate action plans.

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Developing A Survey Instrument

  1. 1. Developing  A  Survey  Instrument   -­‐  An  Overview     Sam  Klaidman   Principal  Adviser   Middlesex  Consul?ng   Sam@Middlesexconsul?ng.com   @Sklaidman   508.877.1924     © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  2. 2. How  Much  is  Enough?  Responses Needed for 95% Confidence with ±5% Margin of Error © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  3. 3. First  Steps      •  Iden?fy  the  execu?ve  sponsor   –  Plan  her  involvement  •  Determine  objec?ve  of  the  survey   –  Who  is  the  audience?  •  Iden?fy  the  intended  survey  community     –  Size   –  Roles   –  Level  •  Think  about  how  the  results  will  be  used   –  Ac?on     –  Informa?on   –  Baseline   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  4. 4. First  Steps  (con?nued)  •  Get  input  from  your  customers   –  What s  on  their  mind?   –  How  much  ?me  can  they  spend  on  survey   –  Preferred  media  •  Plan  the  mix  of  qualita?ve  vs.  quan?ta?ve  ques?ons  •  One  ?me  or  ongoing  survey?  •  Medium  -­‐  web,  phone,  mail  •  Incen?ves?  •  Process  Now  we  can  start  planning  the  survey  instrument   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  5. 5. Survey  Types  -­‐  Transac?on  (event  driven)  •  A_er  installa?on  •  A_er  a  call  to  Tech  Support,  Inside  Sales,  AR,  Service  •  A_er  an  interview  (HR  process  evalua?on)  •  A_er  customer  uses  your  product  or  service   –  Intruder  detected  and  police  no?fied   –  Accident  claim  submiaed   –  First  delivery  received  with  no  other  company  interac?on  (ship  to  end   user)   • Typically  web   • Typically  2  to  5  ques?ons     • 1  to  3  days  a_er  the  event   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  6. 6. Survey  Types  -­‐  Rela?onship  (mid-­‐level)  •  Used  to  monitor  how  customers  feel  about  your  business  •  Very  useful  to  determine:   –  Sta?s?cal  impact  of  each  touch  point  on  Sa?sfac?on  and  Loyalty   –  Gap  between  Importance  and  Sa?sfac?on  •  Broad  focus  as  compared  to  the  narrower  Transac?on  survey  •  Used  to  plan  changes  and  monitor  their  impact  on  a  long  term  basis   • Typically  15  to  30  ques?ons     • Scheduled  (monthly,  quarterly,  etc.) © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  7. 7. Survey  Types  -­‐  Key  Accounts  •  Like  the  rela?onship  survey  but  for  decision  makers/recommenders/end-­‐ users  •  Find  strengths  and  weaknesses  •  Use  with  similar  employee  surveys  -­‐  ensures  alignment  •  Must  be  face-­‐to-­‐face  with  telephone  as  fallback  •  These  are  special  people  and  deserve  special  treatment   • No  more  than  35  to  40  ques?ons     • Should  take  <30  minutes  to  complete   • As  o_en  as  possible  without  annoying  par?cipants   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  8. 8. Survey  Types  -­‐  Special  Purpose  Surveys   •  Market  research   •  Lost  business   •  Employees   •  Suppliers   •  Partners   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  9. 9. Typical  Areas  to  Rate  •  Reliability  -­‐  Deliver  on  your  promise?  •  Responsiveness  -­‐  Helpful?  •  Assurance  -­‐  Trust  and  confidence  •  Empathy  -­‐  Treat  customers  as  individuals  •  Tangibles  -­‐  Making  the  intangible   real   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  10. 10. Qualitave/Quantave  Research  • Random  samples   •  Convenience  samples  • Closed  ques?ons   •  Polls  with  comments  • Limited  response  op?ons   •  Online  Communi?es  • Can t  get  the  story  behind   Quan?ta?ve  Research   •  Focus  Groups   the  story   •  Provide  the  Story  behind  • Provides  hard  data  that   the  story   can  be  extrapolated  to  a   •  Can t  extrapolate  to  a   Qualita?ve  Research   larger  audience   larger  audience   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  11. 11. Quan?ta?ve  Ques?ons  •  Should  have  granularity   –  Yes/no  is  vague   –  1-­‐5,  0-­‐10  are  typical  and  more  specific  •  Should  have   balanced  anchors   –  Extremely  sa?sfied  /  extremely  dissa?sfied   –  High  value  /  low  value  •  Must  be  self  explanatory  and  unambiguous  •  Must  rate  only  1  item  per  ques?on   –  Professionalism  and  courtesy  are  2  items  usually  lumped  together  •  Should  be  impersonal     –  Rate  processes  and  policies  not  individuals  •  Should  have  an  escape  selec?on     –  No  opinion   –  No  comment   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  12. 12. Qualita?ve  Ques?ons    •  Must  not  suggest  answers  •  Must  be  easy  to  understand  •  Must  provide  enough  room  to  answer  completely  •  Ideal  for  text  mining   –  Depending  on  number  of  surveys  could  have  different  people  with   individual  biases,  summarizing  results   –  Lose  emo?ons   –  Very  ?me  consuming  •  Help  explain  quan?ta?ve  answers  •  Add  credibility  to  survey  results   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  13. 13. Choosing  Media  •  Web  survey     –  Lowest  comple?on  rate  but  easiest  to  automate   –  Least  intrusive  to  customer   –  Reports  exactly  what  the  customer  wants  to  say  •  Telephone  survey   –  Higher  comple?on  rate   –  Can  be  pre-­‐scheduled   –  Poten?al  for   edi?ng   –  High  tech/high  touch  •  Mail/Fax   –  So  5  minutes  ago  but  may  be  necessary  where  English  is  not  the  primary   language.   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  14. 14. Some  Examples  From  a  Market   Research  Telephone  Survey   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  15. 15. Example  #1  Please rate the following service delivery attributes in terms of their importance to you, using a scale from 10 to 1, where 10 isthe most important and 1 is least important :Question 03Please rate how important it is to easily get your inspection and/or service visits scheduled.01) 10 0402) 903) 804) 705) 606) 507) 408) 309) 210) 111) No Opinion This  is  part  of  a  group  of  ques?ons  asking  customers  to  rate  the   importance  of  various  service  aaributes.   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  16. 16. Example  #2  Question 13What features of your current service agreement(s) are of most value toyou? 01) Comments / What? 14 GL3 02) No CommentQuestion 14What features that you don t currently have in your service agreement(s)would you like to have? 01) Comment / What? 15 GL3 02) None 03) No Comment Notice the escape selections and the invitation to comment © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  17. 17. Example  #3  Question 17Assuming you were allowed, how likely would you be to recommend COMPANY to colleagues or others? Would yoube… 01) Extremely Likely 18 02) Likely 03) Neutral / Why? GL3 04) Unlikely / Why? GL3 05) Extremely Unlikely / Why? DK) No Comment No?ce  the  symmetry  of  the  choices   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved
  18. 18. Any  Ques?ons?   Thank  You   © 2009 Middlesex Consulting . All Rights Reserved

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