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1
DO GREAT
THINGS
REDEFINING
LEARNING
BECOME
A ‘MOS’
CHAMPION
BBC
ENCHANTED
KINGDOM
NOV 2015
INKING
IN THE
CLASSROOM
STAFF...
15
So with community in mind, what
do we have planned for our follow
up issue?
We are thrilled to have Merlin John
pen our...
Journalist covering learning and ICT.
@merlinjohn
Muggle, Dad, Headteacher
www.upsndowns.co.uk Cricket, The
Beatles. You’r...
4
REDEFINING
LEARNING
5
In education we know that the scarce
resource isn’tchallenges for learning
design.”
He should know. With an impressive
t...
➜
This certainly wasn’t a marketing
exercise for Microsoft products –
teacher feedback would not allow
that for starters. ...
REDEFINING
LEARNING
“When I first came in Wymondham
in 2009 in Year 7 there was no Office
365 and there were no tablets on...
So imagine the dismay in the
afternoon when, on a comfort break,
the Surface slipped out of my grasp
and fell awkwardly on...
DATE SCHOOL NAME TITLE
EVENTBRITE
DETAILS
24/11/2015 CORNWALLIS ACADEMY
CHRISTOPHER
JONES
ASSISTANT
PRINCIPAL
26/11/2015
S...
Over the years, we’ve
seen the development of
awiderangeofoptionsfor
interacting with computers
– as well as keyboard and
...
Then there’s notetaking, Oviatt
presents evidence that the student
who uses a keyboard for making notes
in a lesson or lec...
A different kind of lesson.
It seems to me that what’s opening up here is a different way of running a classroom in which ...
There are real opportunities here for ‘stretching’
students individually, encouraging feedback from them
and peer-to-peer ...
I Write Music.
IT’S PROBABLY THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD.
DAVID WILLIAM HEARN
14
“Music, in all its forms, is all
around us. Whether it’s a simple
bird song, in the background of an
advert on TV, or a dr...
Surface is also portable and powerful,
so you can take it out with you on
the road - yet still have full playback
writing ...
We’re continuing to work hard on
StaffPad, and we update it regularly with
more features. By the time you read this,
we’ll...
18
The best Windows ever.
windows.com
PRACTICAL STEPS FOR TAKING
TECHNOLOGY FORWARD IN YOUR SCHOOL
BACK TO THE FUTURE
19
BY TOM REES
HEAD TEACHER OF SIMON DE SENLIS PRIMARY
➜
TODAY, 30 YEARS LATER, AS A HEADTEACHER I
HAVE WALKED AROUND SCHOOL ...
opportunities to create, collaborate and
publish now revealing themselves as the
areas where learning can really be made
b...
So who gets the devices first?
I’m an advocate for flooding a year
group or department at a time rather
than sharing out n...
I GUESS YOU GUYS ARENT READY FOR THAT YET; BUT YOUR KIDS ARE GOING TO LOVE IT
Marty was 30 years ahead of his time and it’...
Showcase School
oasis
COMMUNITY
LEARNING
Youthwork
Healthcare
24
15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10
➜
oasis COMMUNITY
LEARNING
Showcase School
SHOWCASE
SCHOOLof something bigger...
15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10
SHOWCASE
CHOOL ➜
Showcase School
possibilities to make OasisZone a global
pla...
15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10
Please feel free
to contact
@JohnBarneby
if you have any
questions.
Head of G...
➜
MIEE Report
28
15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10
Microsoft Expert Educator, Matthew
Pitts teams up with BBC Earth to
provide s...
They’ll also be able to find BBC film
makers to join their classrooms as
guest speakers through Skype. Many of
the Enchant...
1515
STUDENT AMBASSADOR
Laura
MIXING IT UP
WITH MIX
31
STUDENT AMBASSADOR
Laura
So you’ve been back at school for a couple
of months now - back into the swing of
early mornings ...
The Process
First Qualifying Round
(Oct 1, - Dec 31, 2015)
9 students from around the UK
will be chosen using the “top-sco...
V E NTS
E
34
We celebrated the launch of #thefeed with our
Showcase Schools and Expert Educators at a
swanky bar in London.
With the fi...
9th October saw us host our annual Redefining
Learning conference at our HQ offices in Victoria,
London. Over 150 of our S...
With the help of MIE-Experts
Natalie Lochhead, Annette Iafrate,
David Renton  Marie Renton we
set up shop for two days at ...
Sir Anthony Seldon
Eddy Newton  Larushka Ivan ZadehMary Nightingale  Lucy Williams
‘A drinks party with teachers’ was how ...
Investing in technology usually comes at a price. Not this time.
Microsoft Office Education Plus provides familiar apps li...
What’s better than free? 
Something that’s free and incredibly useful.
Investing in technology usually comes at a price. N...
Recognising Education Innovation
At Microsoft, we believe that technology alone cannot
develop the 21st century skills stu...
tweet us
TheFeedUK
@thefeedUK
#thefeedUK
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#TheFeed - November Issue

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Issue two of Microsoft's new edtech magazine featuring stories from across the sector.

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#TheFeed - November Issue

  1. 1. 1 DO GREAT THINGS REDEFINING LEARNING BECOME A ‘MOS’ CHAMPION BBC ENCHANTED KINGDOM NOV 2015 INKING IN THE CLASSROOM STAFF PAD SPECIAL “I WRITE MUSIC”
  2. 2. 15 So with community in mind, what do we have planned for our follow up issue? We are thrilled to have Merlin John pen our opening article on a topic that optimises the very nature of our community, a review of the recent Redefining Learning Conference. David William Hearn, founder of StaffPad and composer for American Idol and The Voice, shares some thoughts on the new Windows 10 version of his app and how the inking experience with Surface Pro 4 creates unique and compelling experiences for learners. When we launched issue one of #TheFeed, we genuinely had no idea how it would be received. Our goal was to create something fresh and exciting that captured all the great stories within our Showcase School community and beyond. I am not going to lie, when we pushed the first issue live while on the stand at the Scottish Learning Festival we had everything crossed, and more. An experiment if ever there was one! Fast forward 3 weeks and we have been blown away by the response so far for issue one. In person at events and on Twitter, the positive feedback we have had has been humbling. Our mix of opinion pieces, news and reviews seems to have really resonated and we are excited to continue building #TheFeed in partnership with our readers. Tim Bush Education Marketing Manager Tom Rees is also back for what will be a regular column in #TheFeed and shares some practical advice on where to start for those institutions embarking on their own digital transformation journey. We are also pleased to exclusively announce this year’s new UK Microsoft Showcase Schools. We have big plans for #TheFeed moving forward and would love to hear your thoughts. Share your feedback at @TheFeedUK For issue 2, over several Caramel Macchiato’s, we debated the central theme and focus for the next issue. With a slight sugar high (those Macchiato’s get pretty addictive), we realised that actually the decision on which way to go was pretty obvious. We have mentioned it extensively in this foreword alone and that is ‘Community’. Community, and helping to bring the broader community together, is baked into the very fabric of our philosophy with #TheFeed, but with issue 2 this seems more apparent than ever. In person at events and on Twitter, the positive feedback we have had has been humbling. Our mix of opinion pieces, news and reviews seems to have really resonated... Mandeep Atwal Education Audience Manager 2
  3. 3. Journalist covering learning and ICT. @merlinjohn Muggle, Dad, Headteacher www.upsndowns.co.uk Cricket, The Beatles. You’re all clear kid, now let’s blow this thing and go home. Business and Management Student @LauraJaneEdu Head of Group IT Services, Oasis Community Learning. Interested in innovative Educational ICT at multiple levels. @JohnBarneby Composer/arranger/orchestrator... trivia collector and pub quiz extraordinaire! @davidwhearn John Barneby David William HearnLaura-Jane Ellard Tom Rees 15 A welcome helping hand from our team from so many different backgrounds. contents 2 EDITORS FOREWARD: MANDEEP & TIM 4 REDEFINING LEARNING 9 SIGN UP TO THE UK REDEFINING LEARNING TOUR 10 INKING IN THE CLASSROOM 14 “I WRITE MUSIC” STAFFPAD REVIEW 19 “WHERE TO START” – A HEAD TEACHER’S RESPONSE 24 SHOWCASE SCHOOL: OASIS COMMUNITY LEARNING 28 MIEE REPORT: BBC ENCHANTED KINGDOM 31 MIXING IT UP WITH MIX – A STUDENT’S VIEW 33 MICROSOFT OFFICE SPECIALIST COMPETITION 2016 34 EVENTS 41 ANNOUNCING THIS YEAR’S SHOWCASE SCHOOLS chat with us... Merlin John tweet us @TheFeedUK @microsoftedUK share us TheFeedUK DESIGN AND PRODUCTION BY STUDIO CO2 info@studioCO2.com 3
  4. 4. 4 REDEFINING LEARNING
  5. 5. 5 In education we know that the scarce resource isn’tchallenges for learning design.” He should know. With an impressive track record as teacher, school leader and strategist (30 years in all), he is now one of Microsoft’s key managers for its “School Leader Audience Worldwide” and is worldwide director of its showcase schools programme, a central focus of Redefining Learning. His Microsoft role necessitated his move from Adelaide to Seattle but he still finds time to teach educators completing their doctorates at Seattle University. Microsoft hopes to have 30 of these schools in the UK along with around 120 of its Microsoft Innovative Expert Educators (MIEEs -- there’s a fresh crop of these every year, making for a large and impressive teacher community). Mark Sparvell has three priorities: identify best practice; seek to understand (“not positioning ourselves as experts”); support building capacity (through professional learning, partnering with product teams, supporting events like Redefining Learning). “It’s the learning, not the technology.” It’s surprising how often that educator rallying call is undermined, even by those who use it most, like when you see them click on the Tweets about shiny tech rather than pedagogy. That’s broadly the leadership tightrope Microsoft walked at its Redefining Learning event in October at its Victoria, London, HQ. The solution? Hand over the presentations to educators to ensure that learning is the topic and technology the enabling context. It works. But technology companies and their executives need courage and confidence to do it. Australian educator Mark Sparvell set the tone in his keynote with a “provocative” question: “Is school redundant?” His answer was relatively simple: “Schools which lever digital, thoughtfully and intentionally, to both amplify and extend learning, absolutely are relevant and will not be redundant.” Setting out the leadership and teacher challenges for transforming learning, he spoke of the pressure on schools to be innovative. “Innovation is a survival imperative, a survival imperative for every industry,” he said. “And the pressure for innovation means that creativity is now in high demand. It’s a key resource. MERLIN JOHN ➜ Michel Van der Bel Managing Director, Microsoft UK Area Vice President, Microsoft International “SCHOOLS WHICH LEVER DIGITAL, THOUGHTFULLY AND INTENTIONALLY, TO BOTH AMPLIFY AND EXTEND LEARNING, ABSOLUTELY ARE RELEVANT AND WILL NOT BE REDUNDANT.” REDEFINING LEARNING Mark Sparvell Global Director Of Showcase Schools Michael Atalla Director Product Marketing Office
  6. 6. ➜ This certainly wasn’t a marketing exercise for Microsoft products – teacher feedback would not allow that for starters. Like the teacher who warned that too many collaborators on a OneNote document would slow it right down, a point quickly picked up by Microsoft product people present – we were ALL learners here. Of course this network of Microsoft MIEEs can produce ideal candidates for every angle, like primary teacher Claire and headteacher Tom Rees on why teachers should share (including useful resources for computing). Or Scottish teacher Natalie Lochhead with stimulating displays of how to create engaging multimedia resources for students. Yes she used Microsoft’s impressive Mix and Sway software, but the general principles came first – anyone without access to this software could get the inspiration to go away and find another route. I was ready for a restful lunch, and asked the young-looking teacher next to me how he was doing. Turned out it was 18-year-old sixth former Jason Brown, who manages 2,000 or so Yammer accounts on the Wymondham High Academy network when he’s not studying computing, geography and multimedia. The conversation was so interesting that the digital audio recorder replaced my sandwiches on the table between us. HIs Twitter account (@jasonbrown2k13 tells me he is a Worldwide Microsoft Student Ambassador for @WyHighAcademy It’s Microsoft’s role, he said, to “connect the ‘smarts’ of educators across the world and unlock the knowledge they have about driving innovation and make that available to everyone”. And that’s why his role rests with an educator and innovator. Watching another one in action took us into classroom work. Ian Stuart is a Scottish deputy head (of Islay High School), who was seconded to help develop the national network, Glow. And although Microsoft’s OneNote software was central to his presentation, the focus was on the learning rather than the technology. OneNote is very smart software, in fact it has been the single most recommended program to this particular journalist. But a guided trip around the “functionality” and capabilities of the smartest software, even from a brilliant product manager, will usually bring on the yawns. However, bring on someone who can show you what teachers need to do in their work with learners, and the engagement snaps in. The joy of Ian’s presentation was the foregrounded learning and teaching. Like the reference to the work of lauded researcher John Hattie and the importance of feedback to learners. And it was confirmed by the feedback from the peers he was working with. When someone can show you this, and how the technology can enable and amplify it, you know things are ‘the right way around’. REDEFINING LEARNING Matthew Woodruff Tom Rees Ian Stuart Natalie Lochhead Philip Grant 6
  7. 7. REDEFINING LEARNING “When I first came in Wymondham in 2009 in Year 7 there was no Office 365 and there were no tablets on the market,” he said. So ICT didn’t really feature much in his schooling. Everything changed with the arrival of Kevin Sait in 2013 to take charge of the ICT.  “Mr Sait brought Office 365 and a vision for getting students involved with the running and maintenance of the ICT,” he continued. “We deployed 200 Surface RT tablets for use in classrooms and spent a lot of time creating a Yammer network which is now my responsibility and has got 2,000 members which is huge.  “It’s incredible - students use it to communicate with teachers and find out about homework. We will use it to find about events running in the school it’s become the school’s prime communication hub. “It’s hard work running Yammer, with students and teachers asking about how to use it. Some students use it slightly inappropriately but you have to deal with that as well of course. I love having something to do to call my own and I can create it the way I want it to be.”  “IT’S INCREDIBLE - STUDENTS USE IT (OFFICE 365) TO COMMUNICATE WITH TEACHERS AND FIND OUT ABOUT HOMEWORK. IT’S BECOME THE SCHOOL’S PRIME COMMUNICATION HUB.” If I wanted to know more I could come to his TeachMeet presentation later. The marketing was superb. Asked if the ICT had made a big difference, he replied, “It’s incredible being 18 years old and being here and talking to people like you.” Exactly!! See you at TeachMeet Jason... It was also pretty incredible seeing an 18-year-old playing a TeachMeet audience of very experienced educators. But of course they shared Jason’s positivity. Many of them even make it seem easy when they turn great learning into successful international collaborations, Like Broadclyst Community Primary School’s Global Education Challenge. Just starting its second year, it has already reached thousands of learners across the world to inspire them to create their own businesses and create and market new products, from muffins to bookmarks. Or Leicester primary head Leigh Wolmarans, who was “blown away” when he attended an event with 10,000 other people interested in using Minecraft for learning – “I saw children relate, interact, collaborate on a game of global scale.” The result was his learners creating a “Enchanted Kingdom” in Minecraft over just two weeks, inspired by following their own ‘master builders’ on Twitter. And it was done in their own time, not school time! What a TeachMeet. There were even five-minute ‘rare’ star appearances by a Surface 4 Pro and Microsoft’s first laptop, the Surface Book. Tech allure that immobilised the TeachMeet camel (one for TeachMeet regulars). Jonathan Bishop David Renton Leigh Wolmarans Jason Brown Anthony Lees 7 ➜Marie Renton
  8. 8. So imagine the dismay in the afternoon when, on a comfort break, the Surface slipped out of my grasp and fell awkwardly on to a stone floor. No digital device would have withstood that fall.  It was my worst such breakage – disastrous -- and the thought of losing all those notes and contacts. What a waste. But when the shock and embarrassment subsided the solution was simple. Just sign back into OneNote with the event login. It was all there. Relief -- the tech really did support the learning.   Merlin John is a journalist who runs Agent 4 Change. Redefining Learning was a lesson in partnership and underlined the long learning process through which this technology company travelled. The constructively cynical journo notices the clever education project that comes under a PR budget, or even corporate social responsibility. The turning point with Microsoft for this journalist was recognising the substantial, consistent investment in its education networks that demonstrates its ability to partner, and not just “sell”. Then there is the research loop it built from its Expert Educator scheme through to researchers and practitioners that became associated with seminal works like Michael Fullan’s “New Pedagogies for Deep Learning”. In effect turning the innovators’ work through research into inspirational analyses that, in turn, can feed back into classroom practice. What’s ironic about the “It’s the learning, not the technology” at this particular moment is that Microsoft has had a technology renaissance, and this anecdote from Redefining Learning should exemplify it. All attendees were issued with Surface 3 devices to use at the event and return at the end of the day. All the materials were in OneNote along with space for sharing a lot of very useful information and for collaborating. After experiences with “locked-down” devices at events, this was a breath of fresh air. It didn’t just work but worked well, and was great for note-taking (typing or writing), a perfect tool for a journalist. 8
  9. 9. DATE SCHOOL NAME TITLE EVENTBRITE DETAILS 24/11/2015 CORNWALLIS ACADEMY CHRISTOPHER JONES ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL 26/11/2015 SHIRELAND COLLEGIATE ACADEMY SIR MARK GRUNDY EXECUTIVE PRINCIPAL 01/12/2015 UTC READING JOANNE HARPER PRINCIPAL 07/12/2015 SANDYMOOR SCHOOL EMMA SIMPSON PRINCIPAL 09/12/2015 SIMON DE SENLIS PRIMARY TOM REES PRINCIPAL The event will include: A KEYNOTE BY THE PRINCIPAL ABOUT THEIR DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION JOURNEY GUEST SPEAKER FROM MICROSOFT EDUCATION HANDS ON INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS WITH DIGITAL LEADERS AND MICROSOFT EDUCATOR EXPERTS TOUR OF THE SCHOOL NETWORKING REDEFINING LEARNING TOUR In partnership with Microsoft Find out how your local colleagues are Redefining Learning through technology. Join a Microsoft Showcase school near you to explore how they are using technology to improve the educational experience for learners in both primary and secondary education. REDEFINING LEARNING TOUR In partnership with Microsoft TOUR DATES #REDEFINELEARN CLICK HERE CLICK HERE CLICK HERE CLICK HERE CLICK HERE 9
  10. 10. Over the years, we’ve seen the development of awiderangeofoptionsfor interacting with computers – as well as keyboard and mouse, we have numerous specialist options such as voice, video, gesture, MIDI for musical instruments, eye-tracking, joysticks, switches -- the list goes on. Of these, pen input, although it’s been around for a long time (The ‘Styalator’ tablet with pen was demonstrated in 1956) has taken time to find a sustainable niche in the market. Now, though, writing on the computer screen has come of age. Head Andrew Howard, at the ‘Transforming Learning through Tablet Computing’ conference held at his school in June this year said, ‘In the history of technology we could say that it came of age with the advent of the tablet. And now the pen is another gamechanger.’ One reason for this is the realisation that handwriting is not just the poor relation of typing that many touch typists (myself included, I confess) have believed it to be. A Microsoft-commissioned paper by interface researcher Professor Sharon Oviatt makes a number of evidence-based points about handwriting on digital devices that make total sense to the teacher. One is that pen input is better for teaching and learning maths and science. Over the last decade, our studies and those of others have repeatedly shown that when students solved science and math problems, performance improved significantly when they used a pen interface rather than a keyboard.’ INKING IN THE CLASSROOM BY GERALD HAIGH 10
  11. 11. Then there’s notetaking, Oviatt presents evidence that the student who uses a keyboard for making notes in a lesson or lecture will typically take down a lot of words without fully absorbing the content. A student with a pen is more likely to listen reflectively and write down just the key points. Another finding reaches the unsurprising conclusion that, ‘…. children who drew letters, rather than viewing and naming them, performed better at recognising them visually later.’ But do read Sharon Oviatt’s paper. It’s worth your time. Her general conclusion, and the lesson for teachers, is that the choice of input device is a matter of horses for courses. The professional skill of the teacher lies both making the right choice personally and in helping children to do so. (My guess is they’ll pretty soon get the idea, and come up with some surprises). The keyboard (with mouse and/or touch) is still the default choice producing lots of text (like this article) or supporting internet research. The pen is unbeatable for sketching, mindmapping, brainstorming, drawing and sharing diagrams. Any combination of methods will help with producing arresting and informative presentations or portfolio-style records of work. Does the answer lie with Surface? The key question though, is whether accessible input choices can be readily available on any single device in the busy school environment. The answer to this lies with pen-enabled touch-screen Windows devices, particularly the Microsoft Surface. Together with Office 365 and other Microsoft technologies, they will enable young people to show the full range of their creative abilities. There are some great examples of what this means in a set of case studies of the impact of Surface and Surface pen across three schools in Australia. Carried out in 2014 by the Victoria Department of Education with Victoria University, the research was published under the heading ‘Inking Your Thinking’. One key paragraph, highlighted, says, ‘The study highlighted how naturally students use the Surface multimodal touchscreen, keyboard and pen to develop 21st century skills. Surface Pen, in particular, expanded their learning choices by enabling them to annotate images, maps and graphs and to write symbols, take notes and draw straight onto their devices. Teachers found that Surface devices opened a wider range of learning experiences, incorporating visual, oral, kinaesthetic and aural approaches. Students thrived on the opportunity to use them to learn independently, express their ideas and present and reflect on their learning.” A student with a pen is more likely to listen reflectively and write down just the key points. ➜ 11
  12. 12. A different kind of lesson. It seems to me that what’s opening up here is a different way of running a classroom in which teachers and students can keep connected through their Windows devices and Office 365. Not that the ‘visiting each student’ principle is in itself new. Some teachers have always tried to keep moving round the class, checking on exercise books, adding comments. The logistics of this are quite daunting however in a class of thirty where teacher needs to keep an eagle eye on everyone. Now, though, keeping in touch with work in progress becomes much easier. Already we are seeing lessons in which the teacher has a Windows tablet enabled for pen input and, working in Office 365, can ‘visit’ the students’ work on their own devices, making quick annotations, sketches, words, diagrams. This kind of instant feedback – on-the-spot real-time marking in fact – is best done with pen. Keyboard would be too laborious, especially where formulae, grids and mathematical terms are involved. As a bonus, when an issue is relevant to the whole class, the student’s work, and the annotations, can immediately be thrown up on the big screen for general discussion. instant feedback – on-the-spot real-time marking in fact – is best done with pen. Keyboard would be too laborious ➜ 12
  13. 13. There are real opportunities here for ‘stretching’ students individually, encouraging feedback from them and peer-to-peer collaboration. Creative risk-taking by the teacher becomes possible, because the class can be set personalised and deliberately very challenging tasks that they may have trouble with. To do that in a traditional lesson is to risk demoralising students, or committing them to failure. But with Windows devices, pen, and Office 365, instead of teacher chasing round the room trouble-shooting, or picking up the errors belatedly during weekend marking, she can effectively coach the students individually or all together through the difficulties. This way of working is exciting and engaging for teacher and students. It also saves time and considerably reduces the teacher’s ‘take-home’ marking load. And that, really is just the start. Inking is starting to appear across all appropriate Windows applications including the ‘Edge’ browser, and Cortana and it’s clear that with Windows 10, inking is slated to be a key cross-platform component in the Microsoft Education strategy. Surface devices – Surface 3, Surface Pro 4, Surface Book, and, looking ahead, Microsoft Surface Hub - are central to this, and are set to open up new and exciting teaching and learning opportunities. its clear that with Windows 10, inking is slated to be a key cross-platform component in the Microsoft Education strategy. 13
  14. 14. I Write Music. IT’S PROBABLY THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD. DAVID WILLIAM HEARN 14
  15. 15. “Music, in all its forms, is all around us. Whether it’s a simple bird song, in the background of an advert on TV, or a drum and bass gig where the sound is so loud it physically shakes you; music plays an important part in our everyday life. Music is almost unique its ability to dramatically affect our mood; recall memories, laugh, cry, dance, relax, sleep… good music of any kind makes us feel something. It’s an exciting time for music creators. You can grab a Surface and run DJ/EDM tools, like Ableton Live, FL Studio and BitWig; hugely complex recording software like Pro Tools and Cubase for editing, recording and mixing any kind of audio imaginable - and great free software that’s a brilliant place to get started: like Reaper and Podium Free. However, these tools can be very complicated, and often require a MIDI keyboard or controller and a bigger screen to get things done. They’re also largely designed to create music that will only be performed by the computer itself, through virtual instruments, synths and samplers. Music is essentially a form of human communication and, although we can do incredible things with digital tools, the real magic happens when a group of musicians play together live. Co-ordinating more than 4 people simultaneously usually requires some form of written instructions, so that people don’t forget where they’re supposed to be, and when. Of course, for musicians, this is what music notation is for. Notation programs are usually very complex, expensive and fiddly. About 4 years ago, Matthew Tesch and I started building an app for Windows and Surface that would change all that. The key would be to design it around digital ink and touch. StaffPad lets you draw music notation with digital ink. The app recognises your music notation handwriting and renders your scribbles into typeset sheet music, which you can then play back, edit, print and share. It’s really simple to use - but it took us a long time to make this app! To use StaffPad, you’ll need a device with an active digital pen. The Surface, with its Surface Pen, is the ideal device for this. The pen has buttons that let you quickly erase any mistakes and select notes. The palm rejection means you can rest your hand on the screen without it going crazy and drawing things everywhere. The hover capabilities of the pen (I don’t mean that the pen actually hovers - the screen can ‘see’ the pen even when it’s not touching it) allows us to subtly prompt the composer to show if something is editable, and lets you draw with greater precision. The accuracy of this pen is amazing - it’s super important if you want to write the, um, right notes! “THE APP RECOGNISES YOUR MUSIC NOTATION HANDWRITING AND RENDERS YOUR SCRIBBLES INTO TYPESET SHEET MUSIC” ➜ 15
  16. 16. Surface is also portable and powerful, so you can take it out with you on the road - yet still have full playback writing and editing capabilities. StaffPad is also always saving your score - there’s nothing more frustrating that losing work, so StaffPad not only saves your score constantly, but also syncs it with OneDrive, so that it’s safely backed up and so that you can get to it wherever you are. The app contains a lot of sounds - we have more than 50 instruments inside the app, which all play back in a realistic way. For example, you can write a trill for a clarinet, and you’ll hear back an actual recording of a clarinetist playing a trill on whichever notes you write. There’s hundreds of individual recordings which make up each instrument - letting you write what you want to, without worrying about how it will sound on playback. StaffPad isn’t just for orchestral music - you can write for anything here, including lead sheets for bands or jazz charts. Like Inking inside of OneNote, it’s great to be able to use the pen to brainstorm musical ideas too. StaffPad feature a ‘sketch’ layer, which lets you just easily map out structures and ideas, before going back in and writing actual notation. When you’ve written your magnum opus, you can then print it out or share it via email. You can even print the parts out individually, so that each musician in the band has their own personal score, whilst the composer, conductor or producer retains the full overview of all the instruments in the score. Because it runs Windows, you can print to any printer ever made. I’m a composer, arranger and orchestrator by profession. I work on films and TV shows, TV commercials and big live events. I really wanted an app that I could use in my music work, and not just a toy or gimmick that wouldn’t be useful to me. The best way to do that was to leverage the power of Windows and Surface, which let me build the dream the way I saw it. If you have a dream app that no one has made yet, I’d encourage you to start investigating how to create it — you may be surprised at what you can do! I still find that StaffPad is a great learning tool. We never stop learning - and if I ever find myself with some spare time (unfortunately very rarely!) I often go back and copy out or transcribe some of my favourite arrangements or pieces of music into the app, just as a way of practicing my writing skills and learning new tricks from the masters. StaffPad is a great environment to do that; I can snap Groove Music to the side and quickly play and rewind as I go over parts of the track to listen, write down and compare with what I’ve transcribed in StaffPad. It’s really a fantastic way to get better chops! “STAFFPAD NOT ONLY SAVES YOUR SCORE CONSTANTLY, BUT ALSO SYNCS IT WITH ONEDRIVE, SO THAT IT’S SAFELY BACKED UP” “THE APP CONTAINS A LOT OF SOUNDS - WE HAVE MORE THAN 50 INSTRUMENTS” ➜ 16
  17. 17. We’re continuing to work hard on StaffPad, and we update it regularly with more features. By the time you read this, we’ll have released a huge update to the app for Windows 10, which adds more features and a new design - including the ability to speak to the app with your voice! It’s great to be able to setup a score by just saying “add drums, piano and strings, at 140bpm in F major”. If you’re a composer or play an instrument, and are interested in writing down your ideas quickly and effortlessly, I do hope you’ll check out what we’ve done with StaffPad. We hope it makes writing music easier and more enjoyable… that’s what music and technology is all about! StaffPad is available on the Windows Store, and is designed for Surface. ABOUT DAVID I’m an English composer and music producer, working in London. My music can be heard in television shows; commercials; live tours; records; trailers and films. Some recent work includes music for television shows such as Friday Night Lights, Dancing On Ice, American Idol and The Voice; commercials for Waitrose, Samsung and Lexus; and live events and concerts for major recording artists. In addition to writing my own music, I also work with other talented composers to help bring their musical vision to life, usually through orchestral mockups or additional arrangements and orchestration. I’ve recently worked on feature films such as “Les Misérables”, “Heart Of The Sea”, “The Right Kind of Wrong” and “The Chronicles of Narnia”, and on live shows and events, including George Michael, Katherine Jenkins and the 2012 Olympics Closing Ceremony. follow david on twitter @davidwhearn 17
  18. 18. 18 The best Windows ever. windows.com
  19. 19. PRACTICAL STEPS FOR TAKING TECHNOLOGY FORWARD IN YOUR SCHOOL BACK TO THE FUTURE 19
  20. 20. BY TOM REES HEAD TEACHER OF SIMON DE SENLIS PRIMARY ➜ TODAY, 30 YEARS LATER, AS A HEADTEACHER I HAVE WALKED AROUND SCHOOL SEEING 10 YEAR OLDS HOLD AN ONLINE CONFERENCE WITH A SCHOOL IN PALESTINE VIA SKYPE! October 2015 is a historic date for those of us who grew up to the backdrop of Michael J. Fox’s skateboard, lead guitar and time travel adventures. In part 2 of the Back to the Future trilogy, ‘Marty’ is catapulted 30 years forward from 1985 into a futuristic world, brimming with technological advances, dreamt up by the prophetic Robert Zemeckis. For many, these scenes of what 2015 might have looked like have provided food for thought and discussion over the years as well as a flurry of articles recently about what has (and hasn’t) become a reality. And now the 21st of October 2015 has been and gone and there are still no streets full of hoverboards, flying cars or automatic laces on shoes; no self-drying jackets or giant holograms outside cinemas. There are many accurate predications though such as the widespread use of technology, cashless payments, tablet devices, targeted advertising, voice enabled interactive TVs and (sadly) murkier themes around the use of guns in society, corporate greed and corruption which I won’t dwell on in this education-focused and more optimistic publication. Whilst Marty was still riding around Hill Valley on his skateboard in 1985, I was in the First Year (Year 3 in new money) at Earls Barton Junior School, waiting weeks at a time for a turn on the rota to use the school’s single Acorn computer which sat in the corner with floppy disks and tapes, providing us with the excitement of ‘Trains’ or ‘Granny’s Garden’ to break up the sunny pre-national curriculum days of reading, music and rounders that I now look back on with affection, undoubtedly through rose-tinted glasses. Today, 30 years later, as a Headteacher I have walked around school seeing 10 year olds hold an online conference with a school in Palestine via Skype, 8 year olds programming their own online games and designing web content whilst 5 and 6 year olds talk confidently about inputs, debugging and algorithms. The world has changed beyond recognition and, overall, I think that Zemeckis called it pretty well. Rarely is the future accurately predicted when it comes to technology and in schools this is particularly true. If we were to head back just 10 years from today in a Delorean, we’d be reminded of a world where the Government gave schools e-learning credits to spend on technology which were used up readily like Tesco clubcard points; Headteachers scouring through the catalogues to see what gadgets might transform their still largely-analogue schools. At this time, classrooms were unlikely to have more than the odd few desktops and the now obligatory screen or board was new addition; having individual class cameras with rechargeable batteries was fairly forward-thinking and the explosion of handheld devices was still lurking ominously in the shadow of the much- heralded IT suite. The Government of the day was still dreaming up the statutory targets for schools around every child having access to a learning platform with parental access (which were never enforced or checked on) and the march towards this online future fizzled out predictably, partly due to a change of Governments but mostly because there were no obvious benefits to learners of these expensive and complex side-shows. Even in more recent years, predictions about how technology is used in schools have been more often about automation in the classroom. How could tasks be allocated? How could tests be auto- marked? How could assignments be managed? In the future, would we even need teachers as we know them, as online quizzes and class voting systems enjoyed a brief spell of being in vogue? Wiggle the flux capacitor a bit and we’re back to 2015 and whilst the efficiency of technology has clearly played an important part in improving the effectiveness of school business and communication, it’s not this mechanical aspect where we’ve found any real impact in learning. The explosion of communication and social media in recent years has led us to richer pastures with November: Where to start? 20
  21. 21. opportunities to create, collaborate and publish now revealing themselves as the areas where learning can really be made better. At October’s #RedefineLearn conference in London, this thinking was distilled provocatively by Mark Sparvell who challenged us to ‘Use Technology to humanise learning, not digitise the curriculum’, a call to action which echoes the never-more-relevant work of Michael Fullan who talks about harnessing the ‘pull effect’ of technology as a way to combat the widespread disengagement of learners in modern day schools. Global research shows us that enjoyment and engagement levels decrease with every year a child spends at school so that by the age of 16, only 40% of children are intellectually engaged in their schooling (Jenkins, 2013; Willims et al., 2009). Technology must be used thoughtfully to help reverse these depressing truths around school engagement. The challenge is, as Fullan and Langworthy write, that “Education under these terms needs to be radically rethought — partly to stop the boredom, but mostly to blow the lid off learning, whereby students and teachers as partners become captivated by education day in and day out.” So (partly) with this call to action ringing in my ears, we’ve started the school year by announcing a series of #RedefineLearn conferences which will be held at Simon de Senlis over the course of this academic year. These are free and are aimed at all school leaders or teachers who would like to join the debate around the place of technology to improve learning. They include hands-on sessions with devices as well as opportunities to see the school in action and exchange ideas with colleagues from other schools. What these sessions have taught me so far is that as well as the obvious need for developing a school vision around learning and practice, schools still have lots of questions about upgrading hardware, procurement and deployment as they wrestle with the practicalities of updating their infrastructures within tight budget constraints. So in the spirit of keeping it simple, here are some answers to some questions that I was asked by a group of school leaders who attended the #RedefineLearn workshop at Simon de Senlis earlier this month which are focused on getting started - particularly if you’re new to a school or have decided that the time has come to update the technology but aren’t sure where to start. Unfortunately, there are no Deloreans, freebies or shortcuts to get there quickly but with a clear vision, a pragmatic strategy and plenty of patience, it’s possible. Where do I start? At the very beginning! When I joined Simon de Senlis Primary in September 2012, the technology picture was one that many schools will still recognise. There was an aging server and an IT suite that was so slow logging into the network that staff had stopped using it. A handful of iPads were scattered around the school and the staff laptops were old. Everywhere I looked there was someone else telling me that we needed to ‘update the laptops’. Although there was pressure from everyone to buy new devices, we realised that it was pointless until we had upgraded the broadband and installed an enterprise standard Wi-Fi solution. The first year’s budget was spent on these upgrades and updating the oldest staff devices. It wasn’t until Year 2 that we started to really invest in new devices for staff. My advice to anyone is to fix the infrastructure first before looking at buying in more devices. How do we fund it? There’s no easy answer to this one - particularly with the decrease in capital budgets in recent years. It has to be staged over a number of budgets with a plan around which areas of school to impact on first. There are still some Local Authorities where capital loans are available with either zero or very low interest rates which are worth looking at if you can afford the 3or 5 year commitment to repayment. The good news is that the cost has come down significantly. When I priced up 60 laptops and our Local Authority Learning Platform in 2012, the cost including storage was around £30,000. This summer, with more cost effective Windows 10 devices and free Office 365, we have been able to achieve the same solution for just over £10,000. With the cloud now our main storage site, we’ve also taken out the cost of on-site servers and the maintenance of these which is a worthwhile saving. TECHNOLOGY MUST BE USED THOUGHTFULLY TO REVERSE THE DEPRESSING TRUTHS AROUND SCHOOL ENGAGEMENT. ➜ 21
  22. 22. So who gets the devices first? I’m an advocate for flooding a year group or department at a time rather than sharing out new technologies on a rota. If classes still only get to use devices once or twice a week, there’s no way that daily practice will change so I’d prefer to see a year group where they get access all the time so that children get used to having technology as just another classroom resource like the paint brushes, numicon and pencils. At Simon de Senlis, we started with Years 5 and 6 and then targeted different year groups as and when the budget allowed. One thing I would recommend is to allocate sets to individual classes which works much better in my experience than shared trolleys where there can be more issues around devices not being returned, charged or stored securely - having clear ownership means that children and staff tend to care and look after the kit better. Which devices should we buy? We have a variety of different devices across school at Simon de Senlis and part of the rationale for having a ‘mixed- economy’ is so that children can choose the right tool for the job which all run on the common platform of Windows 10 and Office 365. Smaller tablets are used for capturing media, having quick access to content online and for online games and applications whereas notebooks and laptops are more effective when producing writing, creating multi-media content or coding. It’s good to have some more powerful devices in school for more complex working but the vast majority of work carried out is based online and therefore can be achieved without breaking the bank. In my experience, the cheapest rarely offers best value though and our choice has been for mid-range student devices to increase longevity and higher- spec teacher devices to keep the staff productive. So should we get rid of the IT suite? If you can afford the space, replacement and maintenance, I think that dedicated suites are still a really valuable resource, particularly for specific curriculum areas such as computing where all children need simultaneous access to programmes or cloud applications. They do offer more stability and reliability than laptops but they don’t change practice in the classroom. How do we set up our devices… on the server or as stand alone machines? To avoid the slow startup times that can be associated with a server, we’ve set student devices up as stand alone and then children log into their Office 365 accounts or other cloud applications as and when they need to open, save or edit content. This means that as soon as you switch on the device, you’re online and so get that instant interaction with the web that we now expect and demand. In Windows 10, staff and students are also able to login with their Office 365 IDs which is another great way to have children interact with their documents and onilne. IM AN ADVOCATE FOR FLOODING A YEAR GROUP OR DEPARTMENT AT A TIME RATHER THAN SHARING OUT NEW TECHNOLOGIES ON A ROTA. ➜ 22
  23. 23. I GUESS YOU GUYS ARENT READY FOR THAT YET; BUT YOUR KIDS ARE GOING TO LOVE IT Marty was 30 years ahead of his time and it’s a good reminder that whilst we need to have an eye and one foot in the future, we also need to make sure that our attention is focused around the realities of the here and now when implementing new technologies and change in a school. Some of us who have been trying to introduce technology in schools for some time will recognise the glazed looks that enthusiastic and avid ‘expertise’ can create in a staffroom and so we must do better at simplifying the processes, expectations and technology itself if we are to avoid having to shuffle awkwardly out of CPD sessions muttering something about how the kids will love it, even if you’re not ready for it yet. Please feel free to contact Tom with any question. @trees2066 23
  24. 24. Showcase School oasis COMMUNITY LEARNING Youthwork Healthcare 24
  25. 25. 15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10 ➜ oasis COMMUNITY LEARNING Showcase School SHOWCASE SCHOOLof something bigger than their own school, is by using modern communications tools and technology. Our teachers do not get to meet teachers from other Oasis academies very frequently, but we are finding other ways to connect them. Our platform for making all this happen is called the OasisZone. The platform is built on Microsoft Office 365, which we moved all of our email services to back in 2014. That move alone saved us a huge amount of money because we used to host our own Exchange servers for 22,000 users. As we move forwards, it is the other parts of Office 365 that are enabling the real innovation and helping our schools realise the benefits of belonging to the “One Oasis” family. Herearesome of the Office365 components we are using as part of the OasisZone: Skype for Business. We have a global address book for all Oasis staff across all 47 academies, plus all of the Oasis national team staff. This lets our teachers find colleagues from across the country and have free phone calls, video conferencing and online meetings – sharing curriculum ideas or even getting guest speakers into their classrooms. Our weekly Education Team Briefing is now delivered via Skype. Being part of something big, whilst retaining a family feel where every student, staff member and parent matters. By John Barneby Oasis Community Learning was set up in 2004 with the express purpose of transforming learning, lives and communities through the development of the Oasis Academies. We are one of the largest multi-Academy sponsors in England, currently with 47 Academies opened since 2004. Our mission is to deliver exceptional education by creating and sustaining a network of excellent learning communities where every student can realise their full potential. At a global level Oasis Community Learning (OCL) belongs to a family of charitable organisations working in multiple countries and supporting a variety of causes. The ambition from the top of the organisation is for everyone in all of our Academies to feel part of that global community – part of “One Oasis”. The support networks within Oasis are phenomenal, being part of a group is one of the main reasons I wanted to work in an Oasis academy.” Oasis Academy Silvertown Behind the “One Oasis” approach there is one global IT infrastructure supported by Oasis IT Services, which has been put in place over the last 2 years. With that infrastructure, the Oasis Services IT team offer a range of services to our academies throughout the four regions, ensuring they have reliable networks and a sustainable way of delivering technology to the classroom. Oasis IT Services has been an integral part of the Oasis Community Learning solution from the start and currently has 96 members employed in supporting learning. Our approach is all about “National Economies of Scale, Local Choice” – ensuring that the Academies get value for money by being part of a group, but are still empowered to decide on how technology is best used to enhance learning in their own unique settings. We have been clear from the start, that the only way to enable a culture of collaboration between our academies and to help all Oasis teachers to feel part “ 25
  26. 26. 15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10 SHOWCASE CHOOL ➜ Showcase School possibilities to make OasisZone a global platform and make a real impact in people’s lives, and bring the whole Oasis family closer together. OneDrive, Class Notebook and Staff Notebook. Our long-term plan is to have less and less data stored locally on school networks and to move more and more of our data into the cloud. OneDrive is a great way of moving documents between home and school, and gives all of our teachers more storage space than they’ll ever need! We are identifying how best to make use of the powerful tools for both staff and students through the shared ‘Notebooks’ which will bring about a significant pedagogical shift. Whilst OasisZone is already delivering great benefits to OCL staff, the impact on students and their learning both inside and outside the classroom is now also starting to be seen. As well as delivering first-class and innovative education, Oasis builds ‘hubs’ in the areas it works; creating safe and inspiring local neighbourhoods that provide integrated oasis COMMUNITY LEARNING The Oasis Yammer Network. Yammer is the social network for all Oasis teachers, support staff and national staff. It lets them post updates or news stories about their Academies and is great for sharing knowledge and finding experts on particular subjects from within our own network. An example of how this is now working in practice comes from the London and SE region where each subject or phase of education, and just as importantly administration and support teams, have their own Yammer group known as the Regional Improvement Network groups. There is a voluntary leader for the group who makes things happen. Their first task has been to maximise the time available for their group when they meet face to face at a regional conference later in the term by finding out what key issues they should target. A perfect way to gauge opinions through the ‘Poll’ tool and dialogues about any pressing issues. National International News. Our teachers are proud to work for an organisation that does so much good around the world, but it’s hard to keep up a recycling program to share PCs and Laptops with our Oasis projects in Africa sites. This gives us even more “Our teachers are proud to work for an organisation that does so much good around the world”. 26
  27. 27. 15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10 Please feel free to contact @JohnBarneby if you have any questions. Head of Group IT Services SHOWCASE SCHOOL and diverse services to benefit the whole person and the whole community. Many of our Academies and hubs are in some quite challenging areas of the UK, so anything we can do to help our students and their families is welcomed. All young people across Oasis can now get 5 free copies of Microsoft Office at home, which not only saves them money – but also ensures that they have modern software at home to do their homework. Sway and Office Mix The advent of the Computing curriculum 2014 created new levels of challenge for the IT infrastructure, IT Teams and teachers. Adding in the ‘Life after Levels’, changes to the core subjects and the OFSTED requirement for 2016, ‘Progress 8’, has made a collaborative approach to moderated data essential not a luxury, our CPD programme has to reflect this. Based upon an Excel tool designed internally at Microsoft Showcase School Oasis Academy South Bank we are just starting to use innovative approaches to CPD and engaging resources shared through the Office 365 tools such as Sway and Office Mix are proving a great success. As a record of CPD sessions these tools are incredibly powerful giving pre and post development sessions real clout. Here is a link to a Sway from a session where primary teachers learnt about the creation of bitmap images through binary code – it went down a treat and helped to dispel a lot of anxiety amongst some of the less confident teaching staff. They all became experts and could revisit the session again and again as well as sharing with colleagues from other schools! “Oasis is about inclusion, our values our ethos – a sense of family community – we can take a PGCEstudent through from NQT to Headship, with those same values.” Clare Wilson, Oasis National Team Oasis is a great place to work, and has a strong ethos, but it’s always tough to really build a common culture when we just don’t get to see each other enough. Office365 is starting to change that and is bringing people closer together, helping us connect with new colleagues and discover new ways to collaborate. Showcase School oasis COMMUNITY LEARNING 27
  28. 28. ➜ MIEE Report 28
  29. 29. 15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10 Microsoft Expert Educator, Matthew Pitts teams up with BBC Earth to provide schools with an immersive and creative way of teaching children with ‘the most ambitious 3D nature film ever made’. Taking time out to talk to us, Neil Nightingale, Director of Enchanted Kingdom and Patrick Morris Co-Director, explain the partnership, ‘‘When we set out to produce Enchanted Kingdom, our vision was to create the most enchanting nature film ever made. We wanted Enchanted Kingdom to change the way that our audiences see the world. The story takes you on a spell-binding journey through seven different extraordinary realms, opening up the word and revealing its wonders. Along the way you will meet a cast of incredible characters from heart-melting baby gorillas found deep in the forest, to extraordinary dancing lizards in a hot desert realm. We are excited that our partnership with Microsoft will allow us to extend the magic to the classroom. The broad range of landscapes, creatures and behaviours covered in the film make it an incredibly rich resource for education.’’ Microsoft has launched an educational e-book, packed with project ideas, lesson plans and resources to support the delivery of the film in the context of a classroom. The e-book has been developed by MIE-Expert Matthew Pitts from Broadclyst Community School, “The projects we have developed have captured the imagination of our students. As an example, one of the scenes in the film is set in the ‘frozen spires’ of Mount Kenya. We tasked our students with designing a camera case that could withstand such a frozen environment and encouraged them to use software packages to work together and create a solution.’’ MIEE Report: Taking audiences on a journey of discovery through the wilds of Africa, narrated by Idris Elba, star of The Wire, Luther and Oscar- nominated Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, comes the latest nature movie instalment from BBC Earth, ‘Enchanted Kingdom 3D’. Idris Elba Actor ©BBC Media Centre Matthew Pitts MIE–Expert Patrick Morris Co –Director 29
  30. 30. They’ll also be able to find BBC film makers to join their classrooms as guest speakers through Skype. Many of the Enchanted Kingdom projects also feature apps from the Windows Store, which can be used to view film images, videos and reference materials. This Enchanted Kingdom e-book is now available to schools and educators up and down the country. Check out the resources here. 15SEE THE LAUNCH VIDEO UPGRADE TO WINDOWS 10 ‘’Students use collaboration tools such as Office 365, Office Mix, OneNote and Skype in the Classroom to debate, discuss, problem solve, and connect with other classrooms. There are seven phases in the film, which takes place in Africa, set in some of the wettest, driest, hottest and coldest environments the world has to offer – the teaching aids cover all of this not only put the onus on the students to think more deeply about the world around them but also teach them the value of working collaboratively.” The e-book introduces ‘project based learning’ into the classroom – a method of teaching that encourages students to improve their engagement in the curriculum by exploring the world around them, developing solutions to challenges in a creative and collaborative learning environment. The various projects cover topics from across the curriculum from the humanities to the sciences, and coding. Matthew explains, ‘The beauty of the project-based approach lies in the fact that as a teacher you can allow the project to take your class on a learning journey in a variety of different directions. ‘Enchanted Kingdom’ raises many further questions and offers glimpses into exciting diversions. Each project in this book is mapped to a specific learning objective. Please feel free to contact Matt if you have any questions or would like to collaborate! @Matt_Pitts MIEE Report: ‘‘Partnering with Microsoft enables us to take this vision of the film one step further and encourage children to think differently about the world around them and challenge themselves to discover more and problem solve.’’ Neil Nightingale, Director of Enchanted Kingdom Creative Director of BBC Earth These objectives are common to most countries’ curricula. However, they may need to be adapted by the class teacher on the basis of age and ability. The projects have also been mapped to specific subject areas, allowing teachers to cover a wide area of the curriculum using a single engaging premise – exploring Enchanted Kingdom. Imaginatively used, they will open up additional purposeful, cross- curricular possibilities and activities that will enhance the main project. We would encourage you to take risks in your own teaching, using the projects as ‘jumping- off points’ to other curriculum areas that may not have been mentioned in the plans. We hope you enjoy the projects as much as the students from Broadclyst Primary School.’ Microsoft is also enabling teachers to connect, collaborate and share Enchanted Kingdom projects on Microsoft.com/education. This hosts a community of educators all looking to take advantage of new approaches to teaching and learning, using technology to help students develop more relevant skills for the 21st century. Neil Nightingale Director 30
  31. 31. 1515 STUDENT AMBASSADOR Laura MIXING IT UP WITH MIX 31
  32. 32. STUDENT AMBASSADOR Laura So you’ve been back at school for a couple of months now - back into the swing of early mornings and a day dictated by the bell and no doubt, researching another project you’ve been asked to produce a fancy presentation for? Reflecting on my time at school and university, I wondered what had been my biggest challenge and there was only one answer - presenting. Some of you might be ace when it comes to this, but I know for me it wasn’t that easy. Just the mention of the word ‘presenting’ and I was struck with that well known feeling of butterflies and, more often than not, some degree of nausea. The idea of standing in front of a group of people sharing ideas (without knowing they were any good) was terrifying. And I’m sure I’m not the only one? So, I promised myself that this year I would find ways for myself and others to overcome this - find new tools, ways of thinking and other solutions that would allow me to deliver an engaging and confident presentation… and I think I’ve got it! Have you ever heard of Office Mix? Of course you haven’t, but I know you’ve all used PowerPoint, right? Office Mix is a free add-on to PowerPoint which allows you to make your presentations engaging and interactive, in an easy and quick way. No more death by PowerPoint with slide after slide of text, with the odd transition thrown in. With Mix you can record video or audio over your slides, annotating them as you speak, insert quizzes or polls, online videos and so much more. You can even do a full screen capture and record anything that you want on your device! This is all great stuff - but you need to know how this can help, here are my top tips: Use quizzes in your presentation to test the audience - they will be more engaged and listen to what you have to say The best way to get better is by acting on feedback, so why not use the polls to get other people’s opinions? Sometimes there are just some words you can’t get out when presenting, so why not prerecord those tricky tongue-twisters so there’s no messing up on the day! There is nothing worse than relying on videos to play mid- presentation, but now you can use Mix to embed a video. Panic over. Trying to demo a website I had created to a live audience was one of my worst experiences - nothing worked. Now with Mix you can create demos with a live screen recording. No more ‘it’ll be alright on the night’. If you don’t want the world and his wife seeing what you’ve created then Mix is perfect, you can upload it to Office Mix and just share it with whoever you want to see it. If you don’t want to upload it at all, but want to share it, you can easily make it into a video so it can’t be edited when shared - so no one can be claiming your masterpiece as their own! Use analytics to see who has viewed your slide and for how long - great to see what points you were clear on and where people may have been unsure. Thanks for reading, P.s Download Office Mix today “No more death by PowerPoint” 32
  33. 33. The Process First Qualifying Round (Oct 1, - Dec 31, 2015) 9 students from around the UK will be chosen using the “top-score method” (highest exam score and lowest exam-taking time) in Word, Excel and PowerPoint to qualify for the UK Final in June 2016. Second Qualifying Round (Jan 1, - May 15, 2016) 9 students from around the UK will be chosen using the “top-score method” (highest exam score and lowest exam-taking time) in Word, Excel and PowerPoint to qualify for the UK Final in June 2016. UK Final (June 2016) The UK Final will bring together the finalists (selected from the Qualifying Rounds) at an event hosted by Microsoft UK in June 2016.  Finalists will sit an exam in their qualifying category and two UK Champions will be determined based on these results. Last year’s MOS World Championship attracted more than 400,000 unique candidates from 130 countries who competed to demonstrate their mastery of Microsoft Office products. The UK Championship had over 10,000 entries from more than 100 academic institutions with 20 finalists invited to the UK Final at Microsoft UK in June 2015.  Alfie-Fuller Burgess from Ormiston Park Academy and Thi Ngoc Linh from London School of Economics and Political Science were crowned UK Champions and represented the country at the MOS World Championship Final in Dallas, Texas. This year’s two UK Champions will each win the trip of a lifetime to Orlando, Florida and the chance to compete for the World Championship (with a top prize $7,500 USD)!  Visit the MOS World Championship website for more information. The Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) World Championship is a global competition that tests students’ skills on Microsoft Office applications, operated and sponsored in the UK by Prodigy Learning. Be This Year’s Winner! *Terms and Conditions apply.  For full Terms and Conditions of the local UK competition please email info@prodigylearning. com.  Students must be enrolled in an approved, accredited learning institution and be 13 to 22 years of age (as of June 15, 2016). Win a trip of a lifetime to Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida! Winners: Alfie-Fuller Burgess Thi Ngoc Linh 33
  34. 34. V E NTS E 34
  35. 35. We celebrated the launch of #thefeed with our Showcase Schools and Expert Educators at a swanky bar in London. With the first month’s issue reaching over 20,000 readers – needless to say it was smiles and drinks all around. 35
  36. 36. 9th October saw us host our annual Redefining Learning conference at our HQ offices in Victoria, London. Over 150 of our Showcase Schools and Expert Educators congregated to share their vision and thought leadership in education and technology with their peers. Don’t take our word for it, check out #redefinelearn for highlights captured by our MIE-Experts. Mark Sparvell Global Director Of Showcase Schools Ari Schorr Product Marketing Managaer Michael Atalla Director Office Product Marketing 36
  37. 37. With the help of MIE-Experts Natalie Lochhead, Annette Iafrate, David Renton Marie Renton we set up shop for two days at the Scottish Learning Festival. SLF is a pivotal event in the Scottish Edu calendar aimed at celebrating the teaching profession. We were also lucky enough to be joined by this year’s Kodu Kup winners Dunoon Primary School. Check out #SFL15 for all the action.Alasdair Allan Scottish Parliament Ollie Bray Ian Stuart Natalie Lochhead Annette Iafrate David Renton Marie Renton Dunoon Primary School Kodu Kup Winners 2015 37
  38. 38. Sir Anthony Seldon Eddy Newton Larushka Ivan ZadehMary Nightingale Lucy Williams ‘A drinks party with teachers’ was how brilliant moderator and ITN television newsreader Mary Nightingale introduced the first ever Tatler Schools Live! event, in association with Microsoft Surface, to a crowd of over 250 eager parents inside the ballroom at the Jumeirah Carlton Tower. Things kicked off with a talk from Sir Anthony Seldon (former master of Wellington College), who delved into the topic of what an education should be, telling the audience that ‘the best parents choose the school best for the child, the worst parents choose the school best for them’. Wellington College have opted to go all things Surface and we look forward to welcoming them as a Showcase School. All Images © Tatler Bystander 38
  39. 39. Investing in technology usually comes at a price. Not this time. Microsoft Office Education Plus provides familiar apps like Word, Excel and OneNote free to all eligible teachers and pupils in an easy-to-install download. Empower your teachers and pupils with the tools they’re familiar with, on multiple devices such as PCs, mobiles and tablets – at school and at home. Are you making the best of what you’ve got? Celebrate with Education2016 Levente Nagy Office Product Marketing Manager – UK Enterprise John Case CVP Office Marketing WW Brett Johnson 365 Solution Sales Specialist – UK Enterprise 39
  40. 40. What’s better than free?  Something that’s free and incredibly useful. Investing in technology usually comes at a price. Not this time. Microsoft Office Education Plus provides familiar apps like Word, Excel and OneNote free to all eligible teachers and pupils in an easy-to-install download.   Empower your teachers and pupils with the tools they’re familiar with, on multiple devices such as PCs, mobiles and tablets – at school and at home.   Are you making the best of what you’ve got? Check eligibility at office.com/getoffice365 For resources to promote in your school, go to office.com/getoffice365resources
  41. 41. Recognising Education Innovation At Microsoft, we believe that technology alone cannot develop the 21st century skills students require. Technology is an accelerator, but alone it does not enable change. We believe in the power of schools and the impact school leadership can have when they are brought together around a community of professional practice. The Microsoft Schools program is a leadership-focused initiative to highlight innovative leading and teaching across globally recognized schools. What are Showcase Schools? Showcase Schools are recognized leaders in personalized learning, amplified by 1:1 deployments effectively using Microsoft solutions (e.g. Surface, Office 365, Office Mix, OneNote, Skype), to enable anywhere, anytime education for all students. A Microsoft Showcase School work in an open-hearted and collaborative way towards improving the life chances of the students. What are Associate Showcase Schools?  Associate Showcase Schools* (ASCS) are a ‘lighter touch’ group of schools who are exploring some MSFT solutions within the school, have begun a process of transformation or who are exploring new approaches using MSFT solutions. Their leadership is keen to implement technology solutions to drive innovation and improve learning outcomes.  *Associate Showcase Schools can be on boarded at any time during the year. To apply for Associate Showcase School status contact @microsoftedUK for more details. Showcase School 1 2 Abington Vale Primary School Ark Bentworth Denbigh School Duston Eldean Primary School Ecton Brook Primary School Fosse Way School MEET THIS YEAR’S SHOWCASE AND ASSOCIATE SHOWCASE SCHOOLS: Ark Swift Primary School Central London Broadclyst Community Primary School Exeter Cam Everlands Primary Gloucester) Cornwallis Academy Kent Danesfield Primary School Reading Darran Park Primary School Wales Oasis South Bank Academy Central London Ribblesdale High School Clitheroe Sandymoor School Runcorn Shireland Collegiate Academy Birmingham Simon De Senlis Primary School Northampton St Edmund Arrowsmith Catholic High School Wigan St John’s Beaumont Surrey Sydenham School Central London The Whitehaven Academy Lake District Treorchy Comprehensive School Wales UTC Reading Reading Wellington College Crowthorne West College Scotland Scotland Wymondham High School Norfolk 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 20 19 18 17 16 4 2 11 36 9 8 10 12 13 147, 1, 15 16 17 5, 18 19 20 Headlands Primary School Lings Primary School Myddelton College Sevenoaks School Weston Favell CE Primary Wirral Grammar School for Boys Associate Showcase School 41
  42. 42. tweet us TheFeedUK @thefeedUK #thefeedUK

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