Typing Matters: Insight paper

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Everyone wants the best for their child and studying is no different. So how does your home learning environment compare to others? And what trends are affecting the way our children study? The results of our Typing Matters survey of parents whose children are in Years 7 to 13, will give you a unique insight into the nation’s behaviour.

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Typing Matters: Insight paper

  1. 1. Typing Matters. Everyone wants the best for their child and studying is no different. So how does your home learning environment compare to others? And what trends are affecting the way our children study? The results of our Typing Matters survey of parents whose children are in Years 7 to 13, will give you a unique insight into the nation’s behaviour. Homework habits Parents said that the three most common places their children do their homework are: in their room at a desk (52%); at the kitchen table (38%); and in the living room (36%). However, almost a quarter (23%) do their homework in their room lying on their bed, whilst 15% do it in their room sitting or lying on the floor. Twelve-year-olds were most likely to lie on their bed to do their homework (31%), with 7-year-olds the least likely (17%). Where does your child do their homework? In their room at their desk? At the kitchen table? In the living room?
  2. 2. Screen time It’s good news for many parents, our survey showed that 87% of children are spending up to 3 hours on devices doing homework each day. This favourably compares with only 66% spending up to 3 hours on devices for entertainment. A little over 6% of children are spending more than five hours a day on their device for entertainment. Which tasks does your child spend the most time on? (Please state in order of time spent, up to 5) The above percentages are taken from ‘rank 1’ for each answer. Set up for success? A fully ergonomic set up in a home study with desktop or all-in-one PC, printer, keyboard, mouse and office chair was by far the most popular homework arrangement at 28%. However, 17% of respondents told us that they had a desk set up elsewhere (for example in the living room or a bedroom). The third most popular option was a fully ergonomic set up in a home study with a laptop, printer, keyboard, mouse and office chair (13%). Does your child use a keyboard to do homework? 76%: Yes 24%: No Hands-on or hands-off? When it comes to nurturing children’s computer and typing skills, 26% of parents mostly watch over their children but let them get on with it. Twenty-three per cent sit with them and teach them advanced computer skills and another 23% try to spend an hour a week with them on the computer. Worryingly, one in ten parents do nothing to nurture their child’s computer and typing skills. of parents pay for their children to be tutored in computer skills Education software/programmes: 10% Other: 3% Talking to friends via social media for a project: 2% Reading books: 28% Writing essays: 18% Paint: 8% Submitting homework online: 2% Computer Programming: 2% Researching on the internet: 12% Designing Presentations: 2% Watching videos/ listening to audio: 11% Looking at pictures/ photographs: 2% Time spent on device
  3. 3. Getting great grades More than three in four parents (77%) had considered how their child’s study area at home (the place and the equipment) could affect their comfort while studying. A similar number (76%) have thought about how it affects their productivity. In particular, 70% of parents think their children’s school grades and performance would improve if they updated their computer equipment at home, with 24% saying they would definitely improve. Year 9 Parents were most likely to agree that upgrading home computer equipment could improve grades. Buying the best The most influential features when purchasing a new device for children’s schoolwork are: cost (60%); brand (38%); and whether Microsoft Office software is available (32%). However, 29% of parents said they would not consider buying a desktop, laptop or tablet if they could not use a unified operating system with their other devices – demonstrating the growing importance of being able to store and share files, such as photos or Word documents, more easily. Top 3 factors influencing the purchase of a new device: #1 Microsoft Office software #2 Ant-virus software #3 Portable hard-drive/ extendable memory A quick comparison The same survey of students aged 18 and over showed very similar results. The biggest differences were seen in the way that older students spent their screen time. Unsurprisingly, they tended to spend longer hours studying, but also longer hours using their device for entertainment purposes - with 15% saying they spent more than five hours studying and 14% on entertainment per day. This compares with just 2% and 6% of younger children respectively. Perhaps most significantly, older students seem to place more importance on being able to use the same device for both studying and entertainment purposes – with more than half (54%) saying it was important, compared to less than a third (31%) of parents. ©2014 Microsoft and the Microsoft logo, are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

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