Opportunity & Equity 2014: Jane Zehnder Merrell

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Opportunity & Equity 2014: Jane Zehnder Merrell

  1. 1. Race for Results: building a path to opportunity for all children Jane Zehnder-Merrell, Kids Count in Michigan Project Director Prosperity Coalition May 6, 2014
  2. 2. 2 oAfrican American oAmerican Indian oAsian and Pacific Islander oLatino/Hispanic oWhite oTwo or more races (US only) (Mutually exclusive - OMB categories for racial and ethnic groups as reported/collected by Federal Statistical Agencies) Major Racial/Ethnic Groups
  3. 3. 3 • economically successful families, • supportive communities, • meeting developmental, health and educational milestones 12 key milestones/conditions to successful adulthood • Range: birth to young adulthood – ages 0-29 • Collection: regular and comparable-state and national Goals for All Children
  4. 4. 4 • Babies Born at Normal Birthweight (5.5 lbs) • Children (3-5) Enrolled in Nursery School, Preschool or Kindergarten • Children living in Low-Poverty Areas (<20 percent) Supportive Communities
  5. 5. 5 • Females Ages 15 to 19 Delay Childbearing • Children Living with a Householder having at Least a High School Diploma • Children in Two-Parent Families • Children in Families with Incomes Above 200 percent of Poverty Economically Successful Familes
  6. 6. 6 • Fourth Graders at/Above Proficient in Reading • Eighth Graders at/Above Proficient in Math • High School Students Graduating on Time • Young Adults (19-26) in School/ Work • Young Adults (25-29) with Associate Degree + Meeting Milestones
  7. 7. 7 Race for Results Index: US 775 701 398 380 348 0 300 600 900 Asian and Pacific Islander White Latino American Indian Black
  8. 8. Michigan's two largest racial/ethnic groups have worse outcomes/conditions than their national counterparts. Race for Results Index—higher scores reflect better results Asian/Pacific Islander White American Indian/ Alaskan Native Hispanic/Latino Black/African American 787 501 668 244 411 776 345 404 387 704 0 250 500 750 1,000
  9. 9. Almost one of every three children in Michigan is a child of color—much less diverse than the nation. White 1,548,470 69% American Indian 13,941 1% Asian/Pacific Islander 64,914 3% Hispanic/Latino 173,982 7% Other 97,437 4% Black/ African American 367,603 16% Source: Kids Count Data Center
  10. 10. White children in Michigan were worse off than their national peers. White Children (69%)- 1.5 million 0 250 500 750 1,000 Race for Results Index—with 1,000 as the best score 827 827 812 704 668 559 521 Massachusetts New Jersey Connecticut Unites States Michigan Mississippi West Virginia
  11. 11. Outcomes/conditions for Michigan’s white children were substantially worse than their national peers on four measures. White Non-Hispanic Children (69%) 75% 50% 25% 0% 36% 44% 45% 37% 40% 47% 63% 69% Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation: Race for Results Math proficiency Reading proficiency Associate’s degree Income above 200% (grade 8) (grade 4) or higher (ages 25-29) of the FPL
  12. 12. African American children in Michigan were worse off than their peers in every state but Mississippi and Wisconsin. African American Children (16%) – 368,000 Hawaii New Hampshire United States Louisiana Michigan Mississippi Wisconsin 0 250 500 750 Race for Results Index—with 1,000 as the best score 583 538 345 252 244 243 238
  13. 13. African American children in Michigan fell well below their national peers on most key indicators. African American Children (16%) 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Math Reading Associate’s Above 200% Low-poverty Two-parent On-time H.S. In school or proficiency proficiency degree+ of the FPL area (less families graduation working (grade 8) (grade 4) (ages 25-29) than 20%) (ages 19-26) 7% 14% 12% 17% 30% 37% 50% 35% 26%26% 19% 32% 65% 59% 72% 66% Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation: Race for Results
  14. 14. African American children in Michigan were less likely to live in a low-poverty neighborhood than those in any other state. African American Children (16%) 64 50 45 41 35 31 30 Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation: Race for Results 75 60 45 30 15 0 New Jersey United New York Illinois Arkansas Mississippi Michigan States
  15. 15. Overall Hispanic/Latino children in Michigan were slightly better off than their national peers. Hispanic/Latino Children (7%) – 174,000 Race for Results Index -- with 1,000 as the best score 540 573 521 411 404 336 331 Alaska New Hampshire Hawaii Michigan United States Rhode Island Alabama 0 250 500 750
  16. 16. Householder with a Math proficiency On-time H.S. H.S. diploma (grade 8) graduation 14% 21% 71% 63% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Conditions/outcomes for Michigan Hispanic/Latino children differ substantially from national averages on three measures. Hispanic/Latino Children (7%) 71% 63% Source: Annie E. Casey Foundation: Race for Results
  17. 17. National RECOMMENDATIONS • DATA • CONNECT THE DOTS: DATA POLICY • PROGRAMS – PROMISING/EVIDENCE-BASED • INCLUSION – ECONOMIC & EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS
  18. 18. Reducing Racial Inequity •Concentrated poverty •Education •Employment
  19. 19. 19 This is our future, and it is NOW.

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