Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Ready by 21: Using Data in Coalitions

460 views

Published on

This was a workshop presentation given at the Ready by 21 Conference.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

Ready by 21: Using Data in Coalitions

  1. 1. Using data in coalitions: Moving from reporting to learning Michelle Shumate shumate@northwestern.edu Kate Cooper katherine.cooper@northwestern.edu Twitter: @NNSI_NU nnsi.northwestern.edu
  2. 2. About Us… 2
  3. 3. Does this sound familiar? 3 “We’ve collected a lot of data [in 2.5 years]. We haven’t issued a baseline report…we’re at a point where we could issue [a report], but we haven’t done that.” - North Carolina
  4. 4. How about this? 4 “[Data collection] is a rabbit hole. We’re building the bicycle while riding it.” - Illinois
  5. 5. Or this? 5 “You can look at the data but you don’t know what it means…there was some concern about data being released to the community without someone to explain what it means.” - Maine
  6. 6. But when it’s working … 6 ““[We created] a HIPPA compliant data system that allowed us to serve families in real time, no matter which agency they're working for. On a monthly basis, actually spits out reports on each case manager’s performance. If the case managers are meeting the performance benchmarks, then the system is working.” - California “The communities receive data from three sources: from students, the partners, and from the National Student Clearinghouse. [Our network] sees that data and aggregates it. I don’t get to see the name of each individual…just the aggregate and the patterns so we can see what’s working and what’s not across communities.” - Pennsylvania
  7. 7. Maybe we can all agree on this… “It’s a really, really long process to get to data sharing…” Washington State 7
  8. 8. Goals and Introductions Goals • To explore how your community uses data to improve outcomes for youth • Identify strategies for your community to collect and use data in decision-making 8
  9. 9. How does YOUR community use data? 9
  10. 10. 10 How does YOUR community use data? Compliance ProfessionalNegotiation
  11. 11. Measuring Success • In traditional program evaluation (when an organization evaluates its own programs), how do you know if you’ve succeeded? • In collective impact, how might this differ? 11
  12. 12. The Journey to Continuous Network Improvement Establish common outcome and program metrics. Develop a shared system for collecting and comparing information. Convene learning community or workgroups. Set SMART goals, track progress, be accountable, and continue to refine programs. 12
  13. 13. Getting Started: What do you need to share? Do you have: • Shared definitions for measures? • Data-sharing agreements? • Plan for data sharing – process? – Plans for cleaning/formatting – Tool for sharing/storing (e.g., repository, software) – Plan for distributing (frequency, discussing) 13
  14. 14. 14 Goodhardt’s Law: "When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure.” Leading Indicators Lagging Indicators % students attending a high quality preschool Kindergarten readiness % of students with excessive absences 3rd grade reading % of students that participate in co- curricular, extra-curricular, or out of school program related to vocational career path Complete meaningful post-secondary education program
  15. 15. Activity goal Bridging Goal Outcome goal 15 Have 10 outreach events to promote healthy living Target population has a more positive attitude towards healthy behaviors Reduction in obesity All ESL teachers complete 20 hours of continuing learning on new ESL techniques ESL teachers use more effective techniques in the classroom based on peer evaluation. Improved literacy outcomes for ESL students.
  16. 16. Getting Started: What do you need to share? Plan for data sharing • Who has access? • Who analyzes? • How are decisions made? • How to evaluate your efforts? 16
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. What is different about CBC? • Use of funding to incentivize individual organizations • No joint programs or policy efforts – Emphasis on individual goals 19
  20. 20. 20 Follow-Ups Recorded in Spring 2015 Parents Who Read With Their Child Daily for 20 Minutes Parents Who Have Increased the Frequency of Reading They Do With Their Child Parents Who Increased Their Frequency of Reading or Read to Their Child Daily for 20 Minutes # of Survey Respondents # % # % # % Children’s Home + Aid Society of Illinois 32 30.48 32 30.48 105 Chinese American Service League 1 3.33 13 43.33 13 43.33 30 Christopher House 27 23.00 47 40.51 58 50.00 116 Erie Neighborhood House 15 13.00 32 27.82 42 36.52 115 Gads Hill Center 16 17.00 33 35.49 38 40.86 93 Totals 59 12.53 162 34.39 188 39.92 471 Exhibit 3: Outcome Results for Parent Engagement (Reading to Their Children)
  21. 21. 21 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Average Change Showed 0.5 Increasea Showed Any Increase # of Program Participants Children’s Home + Aid Society of Illinois 0.92 1.50 0.58 39.1% 78.3% 46 Chinese American Service League 1.00 1.90 0.90 100.0% 100.0% 5 Christopher House 0.85 1.52 0.67 58.8% 94.8% 97 Erie Neighborhood House 1.58 2.23 0.65 55.0% 80.0% 20 Gads Hill Center 1.35 2.67 1.31 100.0% 100.0% 9 Overall 1.14 1.96 0.82 70.6% 90.6% 177 Exhibit 4: Outcome Results for School Readiness: Literacy Indicator Outcome: Increased school readiness (ages 0–3)
  22. 22. 22 Fall 2014 Spring 2015 Average Change Showed 0.5 Increase Showed Any Increase # of Program Participants Children’s Home + Aid Society of Illinois 2.98 4.40 1.42 87.8% 97.8% 90 Chinese American Service League 2.63 3.32 0.69 59.3% 92.6% 27 Christopher House 3.24 4.46 1.22 84.3% 95.9% 197 Erie Neighborhood House 3.20 4.07 0.87 77.2% 96.7% 123 Gads Hill Center 2.96 3.88 0.92 73.3% 90.7% 75 Overall 3.01 4.03 1.02 76.4% 94.7% 512 Outcome: Increased school readiness (ages 3–5)
  23. 23. Small group activity 23 Read the short vignette provided and answer the questions in the last paragraph.
  24. 24. 24
  25. 25. Michelle Shumate shumate@northwestern.edu Kate Cooper katherine.cooper@northwestern.edu 25

×