Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

0

Share

Download to read offline

Managing Media Before, During, & After an Incident

Download to read offline

This presentation provides advice and guidelines on how to develop a good working relationship with local media, as well as how to manage their participation during an incident or crisis, and finally how to maintain your relationship afterwards.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Managing Media Before, During, & After an Incident

  1. 1. Managing Media Before, During, and After an Incident 30th Annual Environmental, Health & Safety Seminar June 7, 2017
  2. 2. WHY ARE WE HERE?
  3. 3. BP GULF OIL SPILL
  4. 4. Who AreWe? At STRATUS PUBLIC RELATIONS, we work with our clients to develop an individualized, public relations strategy that produces positive results. Our team has more than 50 years of combined experience in Domestic & International Business Development, Government Relations, Corporate Communications, and Community Relations.
  5. 5. OurTeam Austin, TX Houston, TX Washington, D.C.
  6. 6. IndustriesWe Serve • Foreign Consulates • Cities/Municipalities • Counties • Economic Development • Energy • Environmental • Gas & LNG • Government & Public Contracts • Healthcare • International Businesses • Maritime & Ports • Media • NewTechnologies (Domestic & Foreign) • Petroleum & Chemicals • Real Estate • Transportation
  7. 7. MICHELLE HUNDLEY
  8. 8. Agenda • Defining “The Media” • Developing a healthy relationship • Media Before… • Media During… • Media After. • Concluding Remarks • Q&A
  9. 9. Defining“The Media” • “Old/Traditional Media” – newspapers, magazines, trade journals, television, paper-based publications, radio • “New Media” – social media (Twitter, Face Book, LinkedIn, Google +, Instagram), websites, e-magazines, blogs • Most technologies described as "new media" are digital, often having characteristics of being manipulated, networkable, dense, compressible, and interactive. Some examples may be the Internet, websites, computer multimedia, computer games, CD-ROMS, and DVDs. New media does not include television programs, feature films, magazines, books, or paper-based publications – unless they contain technologies that enable digital interactivity.
  10. 10. Traditional Media vs. New Media Traditionally - • Phone calls • Letters/Emails • Editorial Board Briefings • Press/News Releases • Invitations to Events/Activities • Gifts • Billboards
  11. 11. Traditional Media vs. New Media Now - • Phone calls • Letters/Emails – more competition • Editorial Board Briefings • Press/News Releases – email, service (paid & free) • Invitations to Events/Activities - electronic • Gifts – not as prominent • “Follow” on Face Book, LinkedIn,Twitter, Blog, Instagram • Bloggers, Community Board posts
  12. 12. Paradigm Shift Traditional Media Where the consumer is fed information that the producer chooses to share
  13. 13. Paradigm Shift New Media Where the consumer has become the producer
  14. 14. PARADIGM SHIFT
  15. 15. Paradigm Shift Timing
  16. 16. Paradigm Shift Timing
  17. 17. Developing a Healthy Relationship
  18. 18. R-E-S-P-E-C-T • KnowYour Audience – Show a little respect to media partners by understanding their interests, reading their material, and not wasting their time. • PITCHING: When you “pitch” an idea to media partners, the story has to include a reason for them to want to print/share it. It’s not all about YOU. It’s about their audience. • NO BLAST EMAILS/NEWS RELEASES: Don’t send a News Release or pitch to several people at the same organization. Know who to send it to – develop a relationship. • KNOWTHEIRTIMING: Don’t call or expect a response when they are on deadline. If you don’t know—ask!
  19. 19. Appreciation • Show a little appreciation when media partners do show up to your event and/or do print/distribute/share your story. • Share their link on social media. • Share their story in newsletters, e- blasts, etc. with their name attached.
  20. 20. Recognition • EVENTS: Make sure to welcome your media partner(s). • Introduce them to key people.They too areVIPs. • Make sure they have a designated space/seat and have what they need before the event begins. • SHARING IS CARING: Share their story with links on your social media.
  21. 21. Managing Media BEFORE
  22. 22. Managing Media - BEFORE • PLAN, PLAN, PLAN AHEAD • Develop a Crisis Communications Plan • Don’t know how? Need to update yours? • Hire someone that can help! (shameless plug here) • Plan should include: • Employee Roles and contact info • Prepared News Releases, Key Statements, Bios of Leadership and PIO, etc. • Media contact info, community/stakeholders contact info, leadership contact info • Website Landing Page for info sharing • List of required tools and items (markers, tablets, laptops, extra batteries, radios, etc.) • More!
  23. 23. Managing Media - BEFORE • If you have developed a good relationship with your media partners, then as an incident is approaching, it will be easier to manage • If you are aware of a situation, you can: • Preemptively communicate with your media partners • First to know – interview or statement • Prepare a News Release to be sent to Friends first • Make a phone call to let them know a news story is coming – stand by
  24. 24. Managing Media - BEFORE • If you have developed a good relationship with your media partners, then when an incident occurs, it will be easier to manage • If you are unaware of a situation (crisis communications): • Immediately contact your friends and tell them to stand by for first availability of information • OR – they will call you! (BEST SCENARIO) • Crisis Communications – landing page, Form News Releases and quotes, etc. • Know who is “friendly” vs. “unfriendly” media – you will have to manage both
  25. 25. Managing Media - BEFORE Example When Buffer was hacked, they sent out an email to their customers before they could even notice.They made sure to get ahead of the story, showed they were taking it seriously, kept their customers up to date, and upgraded security measures to prevent it from happening again.
  26. 26. “Hi there, I wanted to get in touch to apologize for the awful experience we’ve caused many of you on your weekend. Buffer was hacked around 1 hour ago, and many of you may have experienced spam posts sent from you via Buffer. I can only understand how angry and disappointed you must be right now. Not everyone who has signed up for Buffer has been affected, but you may want to check on your accounts.We’re working hard to fix this problem right now and we’re expecting to have everything back to normal shortly. We’re posting continual updates on the Buffer Facebook page and the BufferTwitter page to keep you in the loop on everything. The best steps for you to take right now and important information for you: Remove any postings from your Facebook page orTwitter page that look like spam Keep an eye on Buffer’sTwitter page and Facebook page Your Buffer passwords are not affected No billing or payment information was affected or exposed All Facebook posts sent via Buffer have been temporarily hidden and will reappear once we’ve resolved this situation I am incredibly sorry this has happened and affected you and your company.We’re working around the clock right now to get this resolved and we’ll continue to post updates on Facebook andTwitter. If you have any questions at all, please respond to this email. Understandably, a lot of people have emailed us, so we might take a short while to get back to everyone, but we will respond to every single email. – Joel and the Buffer team”
  27. 27. What made Buffer’s crisis communications such a success? • They weren’t scared to get ahead of the story, making sure that their customers heard the details of the situation from them before they heard it from any other source • They expressed true concern, care and sincerity – and were completely human • They proved that they were taking the situation seriously • They kept their audiences updated on the situation, in real-time, from their corporate blog as well as from their social media platforms • Once the situation was resolved, they heightened their security measures so as to protect the situation from happening again
  28. 28. 10 Things Never to Put in E-mail 1. "I could get into trouble for telling you this, but…" 2. "Delete this email immediately." 3. "I really shouldn't put this in writing." 4. "Don't tell So-and-So." Or, "Don't send this to So-and-So." 5. "She/He/They will never find out." 6. "We're going to do this differently than normal." 7. "I don't think I am supposed to know this, but…" 8. "I don't want to discuss this in e- mail. Please give me a call." 9. "Don't ask. You don't want to know." 10."Is this actually legal?"
  29. 29. Managing Media DURING
  30. 30. Managing Media - DURING • If you have developed a good relationship with your media partners, then it will be easier to manage the media. • Work through yourCrisis Communications Plan • PIO • ResponseTimeline • Key Messages • Update Key Leadership/Stakeholders • On-Site Media Plan (Joint Information Center) • Landing Page Updates
  31. 31. Managing Media - DURING KitchenAid An employee at KitchenAid accidentally posted a tweet insulting President Obama on the company account instead of her personal account, and instead of just deleting the tweet and hoping for the best, they proactively took toTwitter to apologize for the insensitive comment.They also responded swiftly to press questions about the crisis, rather than hoping the situation would just go away.
  32. 32. The offending tweet, posted just before 9pm, was quickly deleted and head of branding for KitchenAid USA, Cynthia Soledad, posted several apologies and assurances onTwitter around 15 minutes later.There still was some reputation damage and criticism. But, there were also others who felt it was dealt with well and that the company did well to respond so quickly, which is widely known to be one of the keys to managing a social media crisis effectively.
  33. 33. Managing Media - DURING TIPS: • Apologize • Be truthful – If you don’t know, say so • Share factual information ASAP - Ensure information is correct:Verify,Validate and correct (mis)information • Disseminate information directly to relevant parties: authorities, support organizations and/or citizen groups • Ensure that the information you share is easy to understand • Monitor communication channels –TV, radio, social media, etc. • Have a place to post factual information
  34. 34. Managing Media - DURING 1 Think before you speak. 2 Don’t speculate. 3 Don’t say no comment 4 Stay on the record. 5 Don’t be offended by a reporter’s ignorance; don’t be impatient with a reporter. 6 Don’t accept definitions 7 Never argue, be nasty or yell at a reporter.
  35. 35. Managing Media - DURING 1 Avoid jargon 2 Always prepare for an interview 3 Know what you are getting into. 4 Know what you want to achieve through this interview. 5 Answer reporter’s calls, or refer them to someone who will return their calls. 6 Announce your own news first… even if it’s bad news. 7 Don’t ask to review a story before it is printed or aired. 8 If you have a statement or idea that must be understood, repeat it again, and again, and again.
  36. 36. HowTo Reduce Potential Liabilities in Communications Pick Up the Phone Where Appropriate Take a Moment to Reflect Limit the Distribution Where Appropriate Avoid Exaggeration, Negativity, and Self- Criticism Avoid Sarcasm and swearing Shorter is Generally Better than Longer Do Not Appear Sneaky Be EspeciallyCareful with Communications to RegulatoryAgencies (even email is part of public record) Watch the Attachments Consider Involvement of Legal to Help Protect Under Attorney-Client Privilege if Risk of Litigation or Enforcement Consider Potential Statutory Privileges Clearly Label Privileged Communications Consider Public Perception
  37. 37. General Suggestions inWritten Communications The following applies to both internal and external communications (i.e. email, operator logs, letters, reports, memos, etc.): • Always and above all be truthful and accurate. • Write as if these written communications could be read in open court to a jury—because they just might be. • Write keeping in mind that these communications could be reviewed by regulators for enforcement purposes. • Write as if these written communications could be quoted in the Houston Chronicle—because they just might be. • Try to avoid using language that might be inflammatory. • Use words such as “potential”, “appears that”, “may have”, etc. where appropriate. This is especially the case where there is some doubt initially into the underlying circumstances—and additional and new information might be forthcoming.
  38. 38. MANAGING MEDIA AFTER
  39. 39. Managing Media - AFTER • What follow up is needed? • Ensure that everyone involved in the crisis is okay. Provide post-crisis resources when necessary. • Thank those that helped you respond to the crisis. Not only is this a nice thing to do, but once a crisis is over, this is an excellent time to further develop relationships that will help you manage future crises. • What documentation needs to be kept? Make sure that all documentation is kept in a secure place that can be accessed in the future. Print all e-mails and file them. Make detailed notes of what happened and when—include who was involved and their contact information.
  40. 40. Managing Media - AFTER Reflect •What has your organization or team learned? •Update processes/procedures •Enable decision-making
  41. 41. Managing Media - AFTER • If you have developed a good relationship with your media partners, then it will be easier to manage the media. • Work through yourCrisis Communications Plan • Update Key Messages • Update Key Leadership/Stakeholders – Event has concluded – Reporting Requirements • Landing Page Conclusion – 1 week • Media Release will be provided with “final” details • Community Outreach
  42. 42. Q & A
  43. 43. How can we help you? Michelle@StratusPublicRelations.com www.StratusPublicRelations.com

This presentation provides advice and guidelines on how to develop a good working relationship with local media, as well as how to manage their participation during an incident or crisis, and finally how to maintain your relationship afterwards.

Views

Total views

233

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

10

Actions

Downloads

2

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×