My Android Dreams of Electric Cats: Emotive Analytics presentation at STC Summit May 2017

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Chances are you're already using some form of analytics for your content, but that only measures the what not the why. Learn about emotive analytics, why its important, how it ties into artificial intelligence and machine learning, and how it works (facial detection, voice detection).

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  • Thank you for sticking to the last session of the last full day. I’m Allie Proff to share what I know about measuring your user’s emotions. I don’t actually get to do this in my everyday work but it’s something that fascinates me and I’ve been researching it since last year.

    These slides AND THE SPEAKER NOTES are up on Sched. There’s a lot I’m really excited to share with you today and we only have 20 minutes, so I’m going to just hit the overview points and let you explore the notes, links, and proceeding article later if it interests you. If you have a question or comment, you can note the slide number in the lower right corner. Ready? Let’s go.

    *************************************************
    In case you haven’t guessed, the title of this presentation is based on the book My Android Dreams of Electric Sheep by Philip K Dick, which became the basis for the movie Blade Runner. Rick Deckard, a blade runner, hunts down and “retires” (kills) rogue replicants (androids indistinguishable from humans), and eventually questions his own humanity. Blade Runner 2049 is coming out October 2017. My android, however, dreams of electric cats because an internet meme without a cat is incomplete.
  • Chances are your company is using analytics of some kind. If I were ask you if analytics were important and if you should use analytics, the answer would be a resounding yes.

    Why? It’s not good enough to think you’ve got a great product or great content. Only by receiving and measuring feedback can you know for sure what’s working and what needs improvement. What gets measured gets worked. Energy flows where attention goes. Paying attention to something puts it in our thoughts and becomes the focus of our activity.

    The thing about our current metrics are that only measure the WHAT, not the WHY.

    <click 2>
    Now, what if I had asked you this morning to measure your user’s feelings? How would your management or executives react right now if you told them we needed to add feelings to the mix? Does it seem kind-of odd? Maybe too touchy-feely?

    We begin the journey of emotions and logic with a famous medical case.
  • Let’s begin. On September 13, 1848, a railroad construction foreman was blasting rock in Cavendish, Vermont. Setting a blast involved boring a hole in the rock, adding blasting powder and a fuse, then tamping sand or clay above the powder to light the fuse. While tamping, Phineas accidentally sparked the blasting powder and the tamping rod shot up through his cheek and out through the top of his head. Lucid and talking, he survived but became a different person. He kept his memories and intelligence but he lacked emotion and he had impaired decision making.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phineas_Gage

    After the accident, Phineas had a changed personality. He became a stagecoach driver in Chile, eventually moved to his be with his mother in San Francisco, and died from epilepsy on May 21, 1860, almost twelve years after his accident.

    His skull and the tamping iron are supposedly at the Warren Occult Museum in Connecticut, but it’s currently closed due to zoning issues.
  • https://pixabay.com/en/doors-choices-choose-open-decision-1767559/

    Further work by Antonio Damasio, professor of neuroscience at University of Southern California, and other scientists show that people with damage between the logical and emotional parts of the brain cannot make decisions. Even simple decisions like should I eat the chicken or the turkey sandwich? They can tell you the pros and cons of each decision but either cannot decide or make illogical choices.

    When it comes to making decisions, we have plenty of other examples where emotion outweighs logic (like when we argue, impulse buy, etc.). As much as even I hate to admit it, every decision is based on emotions no matter how logical I’d like to think I am.

    Why am I telling you this? Because I’d bet if we were all to take a personality study, most of us would fall into logical, analyzing personality types. I know I started as a tech writer because having someone critique my creative writing was too personal. Writing instructions was impersonal, unemotional, and logical and someone’s critique is easier to take when it doesn’t feel personal.

    The fact is, fMRI neuro-imagery shows that when evaluating brands, consumers primarily use emotions (personal feelings and experiences) rather than information (brand attributes, features, and facts).

    How often do you pay a little more for something because it’s organic? Or because it supports a small business owner rather than a large corporation? Have you ever talked to an Apple fan or a Microsoft hater? Refused to buy something from a company ever again because of the way you were treated? Have you ever done something you didn’t want to do (and may have inconvenienced you) because you felt the need to reciprocate something nice someone did for you?

    Advertising research reveals that emotional response to an ad has far greater influence on a consumer’s reported intent to buy a product than does the ad’s content – by a factor of 3-to-1 for television commercials and 2-to-1 for print ads.

    It’s the same reason why “truthiness” or the feeling that something seems true rather than is actually true is causing a lot of problems these days.

    Research conducted by the Advertising Research Foundation concluded that the emotion of “likeability” is the measure most predictive of whether an advertisement will increase a brand’s sales.

    Studies show that positive emotions toward a brand have far greater influence on consumer loyalty than trust and other judgments which are based on a brand’s attributes.

    It’s the same reason why UX focuses on delight…an emotion. And why gamification works so well…because it engages people’s feelings as well as their thoughts.

    Let’s take a look at some common analytics, and then see how we can add emotive analytics to our portfolios.

    https://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2017/32033/what-emotionally-connects-consumers-to-brands
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-the-consumer-mind/201302/how-emotions-influence-what-we-buy
    http://news.mit.edu/2015/brain-circuit-controls-decisions-causing-anxiety-0528
    http://bigthink.com/experts-corner/decisions-are-emotional-not-logical-the-neuroscience-behind-decision-making
  • When it comes to making decisions, we have plenty of other examples where emotion outweighs logic (like when we argue, impulse buy, etc.). As much as even I hate to admit it, every decision is based on emotions no matter how logical I’d like to think I am.

    How often do you pay a little more for something because it’s organic? Or because it supports a small business owner rather than a large corporation? Have you ever talked to an Apple fan or a Microsoft hater? Refused to buy something from a company ever again because of the way you were treated? Have you ever done something you didn’t want to do (and may have inconvenienced you) because you felt the need to reciprocate something nice someone did for you?

    I bet if we were all to take a personality study, most of us would fall into logical, analyzing personality types. I know I started as a tech writer because I prefer being critiqued on unemotional process steps, not characters I pour my heart into. Emotions are really fuzzy and hard to quantify, which makes me uncomfortable.

    https://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2017/32033/what-emotionally-connects-consumers-to-brands
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-the-consumer-mind/201302/how-emotions-influence-what-we-buy
    http://news.mit.edu/2015/brain-circuit-controls-decisions-causing-anxiety-0528
    http://bigthink.com/experts-corner/decisions-are-emotional-not-logical-the-neuroscience-behind-decision-making

    https://pixabay.com/en/cyprus-dherynia-folklore-museum-1240971/
  • fMRI neuro-imagery shows that when evaluating brands, consumers primarily use emotions (personal feelings and experiences) rather than information (brand attributes, features, and facts).

    Advertising research reveals that emotional response to an ad has far greater influence on a consumer’s reported intent to buy a product than does the ad’s content – by a factor of 3-to-1 for television commercials and 2-to-1 for print ads.

    It’s the same reason why “truthiness” or the feeling that something seems true rather than is actually true is causing a lot of problems these days.

    Research conducted by the Advertising Research Foundation concluded that the emotion of “likeability” is the measure most predictive of whether an advertisement will increase a brand’s sales.

    Studies show that positive emotions toward a brand have far greater influence on consumer loyalty than trust and other judgments which are based on a brand’s attributes.

    It’s the same reason why UX focuses on delight…an emotion. And why gamification works so well…because it engages people’s feelings as well as their thoughts.

    Let’s take a look at some common analytics, and then see how we can add emotive analytics to our portfolios.

    https://www.marketingprofs.com/charts/2017/32033/what-emotionally-connects-consumers-to-brands
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-the-consumer-mind/201302/how-emotions-influence-what-we-buy
    http://news.mit.edu/2015/brain-circuit-controls-decisions-causing-anxiety-0528
    http://bigthink.com/experts-corner/decisions-are-emotional-not-logical-the-neuroscience-behind-decision-making
  • The future of design and content will become more about knowing, not assuming, the emotional state of the user and responding appropriately.

    Other terms for emotive analytics:
    * Emotional analytics.
    * Emolytics.
    * Affective computing.

    Related terms:
    * Cognitive computing: simulation of human thought in self-learning systems.
    * Big data: extremely large data sets analyzed computationally to reveal patterns, trends, and associations, especially relating to human behavior and interactions.
    * Machine learning: a type of artificial intelligence that has the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed.
    * Artificial intelligence (AI): computer systems able to perform tasks that normally requires human intelligence such as visual perception, speech recognition, learning, and decision making.
  • When I arrived in Reagan DC airport, I saw this kiosk at the end of a restaurant stand as I walked out from the gate. Granted it’s self-reporting emotions and we don’t always say we feel what we actually feel, but it’s a very simple, low-tech way to measure users emotions.
  • Another low-tech, self-reporting way can be found on one of the Turbo Tax intake screens. At LavaCon, a presenter named Andrew Roe speaking on the importance of microcopy shared this bit with us. They use design and microcopy to try and build an emotional connection with the user, including asking how the user is feeling.

    https://techwhirl.com/lavacon-2016-summary-creating-content-bits-that-connect-with-users/

  • Low-tech affective processing is emotional design. Hard-code in different responses based on users emotions. Andrew also told a story of how he changed some copy. The section that appears after you check the yes box that you have kids is cheery and congratulatory (because you may get a nice deduction). However, that same cheery tone persisted even after you checked the box that the child had passed away. As a father, he knew he needed to change that section, and also any other section that dealt with the loss of a loved one.

    The font is really small so I’ll read this:

    “I finally got around to doing taxes yesterday. After our information was transferred from last years return, it asked if either of us had passed away. I entered the information that (husband) died on June 15, and a screen came up that said “we’re sorry for your loss.” I sat there and stared at it, crying, for a few minutes. It was so cathartic! Please pass on to the team how much that one little sentence meant to me. Whoever thought that up must be a very caring person.”

    https://www.slideshare.net/garrone1/principles-of-emotional-design/46-Using_multisensor_inputsMicrosoftUS_Patent_US
  • This is an incomplete list of companies that do emotive analytics. I’m not affiliated with any company in any way. Please let me know if you find more.
  • http://www.explainthatstuff.com/voicerecognition.html
    http://technicallyeclectic.com/how-does-speech-recognition-work/
  • http://www.beyondverbal.com/

  • http://technicallyeclectic.com/how-does-face-recognition-work/

    FACIAL DETECTION
    Most people confuse face detection with face recognition but they are two different steps. First, the computer must find the face (where is the face, face detection) and THEN it can decide if it recognizes the face against a database (who is this, face recognition).
    Find a face using skin color (color) and contrast, motion (videos), head shape, facial symmetry (eyes, ears), the bridge of the nose and right between the eyebrows.
    Most modern algorithms are based on Viola-Jones object detection framework, which is based on Haar Cascades.

    FACIAL

    For Further Research
    Handbook of Face Recognition http://a.co/07bFXP7 and related books
  • https://cvdazzle.com/
    https://ahprojects.com/projects/cv-dazzle/

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/07/makeup/374929/

    http://futureeverything.org/events/cv-dazzle-anon-salon/
  • http://www.affectiva.com/

    “We believe digital content and technology products are made better when they’re informed by human emotions. At Affectiva, we quantify emotion to help the word accomplish this goal.”

    “AffdexMe is an open source application that demonstrates the use of the Affdex SDK. It uses the camera connected to your device to view, process and analyze live video of your face. Start the app and you will see your own face on the screen, and metrics describing your facial expression of emotion.”
  • Once the computer has found a face, it analyzes points mapping to brows, eyes, nose, and mouth. Different programs will have different points and use them differently.

    In common, furrowed brows, squinted eyes, and pursed lips associate with anger and disgust, open eyes and mouth go with surprise, a smile is happy (though it could mean nervousness or fear), raised eyebrows and downturned mouth is sadness. It didn’t know what to do with my face in the last picture (I was trying for quizzical) and picked anger maybe because of my eyebrows

    Image credits: Affdex by Affectiva
  • http://blog.affectiva.com/affectiva-announces-much-anticipated-solution-to-detect-the-complex-emotions-of-cats
  • Milo

    RoboKind Advanced Social Robotics, Robots4Autism http://www.robokindrobots.com/ and https://vimeo.com/94215300

    Fred Margolin MBA from Harvard and B.A. from Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania and has served as CEO of many startups
    Richard Margolin has mechanical engineering degree from University of Texas at Arlington, and studied cognitive and computational neuroscience at Trinity College in Hartford, CT. Robotics research at Manufacturing Automation and Robotic Systems (MARS) Lab and Heracleia Human Centered Computing Lab.
  • http://www.hansonrobotics.com/
    http://sophiabot.com/

    Backup Philip K Dick link: https://youtu.be/ot0Fuy34xN0

    Background: Bachelor of Fine Arts from Rhode Island School of Design in film/animation/video and his doctorate from University of Texas at Dallas (same place Milo is based out of) in interactive arts and engineering. Worked as an imagineer for Walt Disney Studios.

    He’s been a speaker on TED and has written many articles in SPIE, IEEE, AAAI, AI Magazine, International Journal of Cognitive Science

    Image credits
    http://sophiabot.com/photos/#iLightbox[1165041e45682fe428b]/0
    http://www.hansonrobotics.com/robot/albert-einstein-hubo/
  • I think the Affectiva video (2:51 https://vimeo.com/111135700) says it the best. Emotive analytics and affective processing affects content. As content professionals, we know that content is king.

    So what kind of content are you working on? How will this affect your content?

    Think about a TV remote. You’re going to have a 20-something person programming the remote, and an 81 year old grandparent programming the remote. Maybe you will create quick scannable instructions for the young person, and detailed step-by-step video tutorials for the grandparent.

    Your customer service call center might have a program running to see if the tone of voice matches the words, and an angry or upset tone can flag a manager for intervention or you can have a separate set of instructions.

    Like Turbo Tax, you can anticipate a user’s emotions and write compassionate copy.

    Design for emotion.

    Image credit
    https://pixabay.com/en/king-crown-history-romania-1304612/

  • So what lies ahead?
    Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa, Microsoft’s Cortana, and the Google Assistant voice programs are all actively working on how to improve and customize responses.

    Facebook has already been testing the waters of privacy through their suicide prevention tool. You can flag a friend’s post and Facebook will let you know and ask you if you’d like to talk to someone or get tips and support http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2015/03/17/391056271/fighting-stigma-against-privacy-facebook-s-new-suicide-resources

    Microsoft has a visualization and interaction research group that focuses on emotion tracking, information worker task management, and health and wellness for individuals and groups. At Boeing, we’ve gotten a few new tools centered around emotional health and stress management, one of which is called MyBrainSolutions. Emotional health is a big topic right now across industries, and especially for veteran’s groups.

    The main problem is that our voice and image are personally identifiable information, and privacy is very important.

    Some potential exciting uses:
    Monitor coma patients for signs of pain
    Help blind people know what expression is on the face of the person they’re talking to
    Medical alert technology to detect signs of seizure, panic attack, suicide
    Improve online and distance learning by providing teachers with feedback about confusion or when student attention wanders

    Some potential scary uses:
    Marketing strategies
    15 year old girl looks at weight loss supplements and ultra-thin models, and watches “The Biggest Loser” on TV. Beauty advertising already is under attack for unethical ways in which they portray the female body, this could make it worse.
    Analysts look at the demographics of people filing into a sports stadium. “We’re seeing more Latinos and older women…better adjust some of our advertising on the big screens.”
    Politics (or does that fall under marketing?)
    Candidates based on emotive valence, issues addressed by “viral” possibility. On one hand, political leaders could become better attuned to their constituents. On the other hand, contribute to increase in short-term policy making in order to win votes.
    Lobbying for powerful interest groups that may not be working for the best public good.
    In less democratic countries that are more likely to violate basic human rights, governments can monitor the faces of people during political events. Dissenters could just disappear.

    Exciting AND scary
    Security scans for public places, travel, etc. It could make us safer or it could unfairly target people.

    Emotive Analytics In Use (excerpt from Proceedings article)
    Even in 2013, Gartner identified affective computing as a rising field, a trend that appears in the table of contents for the 2016 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies and Mobile Technologies.
    Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, IBM, Microsoft, and others are investing in emotive analytics as part of the larger AI, machine learning, and natural language fields. IBM has the artificial intelligence Watson, Google acquired DeepMind in 2014, and there’s Facebook AI Research (FAIR). They are investing internally, externally, and acquiring startups that will help their digital assistants such as Alexa, Siri, and Cortana as well as create more customized, personal experiences for users through current online experiences. Even non-tech companies are getting in the game: Shell is investing in AI to create a virtual assistant that can answer questions around the clock.
    The conundrum is that while technology is new and change is easy, we don’t know the full impact on society. By the time we know the full impact, technology is so integrated into society that change is hard.
    However, what seems scary in the present becomes normalized in the future. When sites first started asking for credit card information over the web, people were very worried about data security and privacy. People still have those concerns (and rightly so), but much of the population doesn’t think twice about typing in their digits. New industries have grown up around security, hacking, and alternative forms of online payment such as BitCoin. Our emotions are even more private and personal than our credit card numbers. It falls on us to create and adhere to standards and ethics, assisted by privacy rights groups such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Privacy International, and others.
    Marketing
    Parent corporations such as Procter & Gamble, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Diageo and Mondelez are all using emotive analytics, and most are hiring emotion-recognition companies to test and refine content and media strategy through language and tone.
    Affectiva has software development kits (SDK) and application program interfaces (API) for people to use, and you can see how you react using their Affdex tool, shown below. Once you give permission to use your webcam for the length of the one video, points on your face will tracked, scored, and added to the database. You can then see how you compare with the other user reactions. Marketing can use reactions to fine-tune or reject various ads, or predict virability.
    Call Centers
    Emotive analytics software, either a standalone system or built on top of a customer relationship management (CRM) system, monitors both the customer’s tone of voice and certain key words as well as the call center agent’s tone of voice. Certain flags can trigger a supervisor’s notice for immediate attention or follow-up. Employee Workforce Satisfaction
    Employee satisfaction is just as important as customer satisfaction, since happy employees are more productive and less likely to leave. It costs a lot of money to onboard a new employee, and employee loss is expensive not only in dollars but in tribal knowledge as well. At work, we have an ergonomic program called RSI Guard that measures typing and mousing activity and prompts us to take breaks to rest our hands and eyes. At some point in the future, we may have a program that monitors our moods and suggests wellness actions.
    Education
    Some of the most difficult parts of teaching, both in-person and online, is gauging comprehension and attention. Imagine if online learning course teachers could analyze a student’s face and stop for clarification if the student looks puzzled, or suggest a break if the student’s attention is wandering. Emotuit is one company working to improve student engagement and content interaction in K-12, higher education, massive open online courses (MOOC), and enterprise training.
    Gaming
    Role playing games could change storylines depending on how the gamer reacts emotionally to characters and storylines. Affective gameplay in educational games could improve cognition, memory, attention, and motivation. Games designed for young children could help them learn about their emotions and what to do with their big feelings. Games inside robots such as Milo already help autistic children practice communication and social skills.
    Medicine and Healthcare
    Have you ever encountered someone who looked fine but just didn’t sound right and then ended up being sick? Doctors may use emotive analytics and AI to help a human or robot caregiver to recognize pain or depression in patients. Telemedicine may also better reach and serve people in rural areas, and emotive biometrics may add to the data doctors collect remotely.
    Government and Politics
    Politicians use many marketing tactics and advanced analytics during the election cycle and to garner and gauge support for policies. People can get very emotional about candidates and issues, and it pays to use emotive analytics. Government organizations might also adopt emotive analytics for security or psychological operations.
    Cars and Transportation
    Software can read a driver’s face and alert the driver if he or she becomes impaired due to lack of sleep, drugs, distracted by phone, etc.

    Future research
    http://www.hopesandfears.com/hopes/now/internet/216523-the-uncertain-future-of-emotion-analytics
    http://fortune.com/2016/01/07/apple-emotient-acquisition/

    Image credit
    http://www.businessinsider.com/how-emotient-ai-works-2016-1
  • Thank you for your attention today. I hope you found this presentation interesting and informative. It might not change the way you go back and do your job next week, but I believe this field will be a huge game changer for all of us in the coming years.

    Image credit
    https://pixabay.com/en/robot-toy-grey-first-plane-916284/
  • My Android Dreams of Electric Cats: Emotive Analytics presentation at STC Summit May 2017

    1. 1. My Android Dreams of Electric Cats emotive analytics, affective processing, and the future of content 1@allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17
    2. 2. Analytics •Bounce •Clickthrough •Time on page •Pages per visit •Referring links •Downloads @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 2 •……Emotions?•……Emotions?
    3. 3. Meet Phineas Gage @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 3
    4. 4. No decision without emotion @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 4 ,,,
    5. 5. Logic justifies emotion @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 5 ,,,
    6. 6. Emotion > Logic @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 6 ,,, •Brain activity more engaged by emotions •Storytelling engages emotions •Personal feelings, experiences > brand attributes, features, facts •Reported intent to buy: 3:1 for TV and 2:1 for print •User experience focuses on delight (an emotion) •Gamification (intrinsic, extrinsic motivation, an emotion) •“Truthiness” and the proliferation of alternate facts
    7. 7. Emotive Analytics The ability to measure a user’s emotions through video, voice, wearables, or text. @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 7 Affective Processing Software that can identify a user’s emotions and provide an emotionally correct response.
    8. 8. Level: Easy (can implement now) @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 8 ,,,
    9. 9. TurboTax and Microcopy @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 9
    10. 10. What happened? @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 10 •Emotional Design: Compassionate content created a customer for life through one simple sentence.
    11. 11. Level: Harder • Affectiva http://www.affectiva.com/ • BehaviorMatrix http://www.behaviormatrix.com/ • Beyond Verbal http://www.beyondverbal.com/ • CallMiner https://callminer.com/ • CrowdEmotion http://www.crowdemotion.co.uk/ • Emolytics http://www.emolytics.com/ • Emotive Analytics http://emotiveanalytics.com/ • Emotuit https://www.emotuit.com/ • Hanson Robotics at http://www.hansonrobotics.com/, http://sophiabot.com/, and iMotions https://imotions.com/ • IntraFace (Carnegie Mellon University) http://www.humansensing.cs.cmu.edu/intraface/ • Kairos https://www.kairos.com/ • Lightwave http://www.lightwave.company/ • nViso http://nviso.ch/ • Real Eyes https://www.realeyesit.com/ • RoboKind Advanced Social Robotics, Robots4Autism http://www.robokindrobots.com/ and https://vimeo.com/94215300 • Sticky (eye tracking and emotion tracking) https://www.sticky.ai/ @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 11
    12. 12. Voice to Text •“Cottage cheese with chives is delicious.” •Analog to digital •Break into bits of sound •Figure out what they mean •Beads on a string @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 12
    13. 13. Beyond Verbal •Israeli company Yuval Mor, CEO •Analyze emotions from •Download an app called Moodies. It will analyze speech •Main focus is healthcare. They want to use the voice as a biomarker in detecting disease symptoms @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 13
    14. 14. How does face detection work? •Haar Cascade @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 14
    15. 15. The anti-face: CV Dazzle @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 15
    16. 16. Affectiva and Affdex •Created from MIT Media Lab project •Rana el Kaliouby, CEO •Quantify emotion •Download SDKs and APIs •AffdexMe is opensource version @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 16
    17. 17. How does face analytics work? @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 17
    18. 18. A cat feels… @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 18
    19. 19. Milo the Robot • Built by RoboKind • Fred and Richard Margolin • Programmed by Autism Treatment Center of Dallas and Callier Center for Communication Disorders at University of Texas – Dallas • Teaches social behaviors such as the understanding and meaning of emotions and expressions, and how to demonstrate appropriate social behavior and responses. • Improved therapy outcomes for children on the autistic spectrum. • Milo’s face can smile, frown, blink and look angry, happy, sad, and surprised. @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 19
    20. 20. Hanson Robotics • Dr. David Hanson • We bring robotics to life • Teach, entertain, serve • Sophia has been featured at SXSW and many news channels • Einstein science instructor • Bina48, a living memorial • Interview with Philip K Dick • Interview with Joey Chaos (jump to 3:45. See the laptop below his shoulders, and watch as he tracks the researcher from left to right) @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 20
    21. 21. How does this affect me? •Content creation •Usability and UX •Help documentation •Brand building and loyalty •Customer journey and CX •Customer service and interaction @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 21
    22. 22. So what lies ahead? @allieproff @techniceclectic #stc17 22
    23. 23. lease fill out the survey! @allieproff 23 Allie Proff on LinkedIn www.technicallyeclectic.com @allieproff personal interests @techniceclectic #AI, #emotiveanalytics, #video #writing #UX #contentmarketing #blogging and others

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