   ACICS = Accrediting Council for Independent    Colleges and Schools;   Annual Faculty Development Plan:    ◦ Plan yea...
   ACICS Data Sheet:    ◦ Page 1 will only updated unless you have a major change in      your personal information, acqu...
   Encourage 100% attendance from every student starting from day 1:    ◦   Dean Smith sets this expectation when he spea...
   Exercise:       “Why are you here?”   Student engagement      Attendance = Retention          Remember the goal… 1...
   By the mid-70s, Tinto (1975) developed his model of Student    Integration based on the prior work of Spady (1970):   ...
   By the mid-90s, Swail (1996) developed a model for student    retention based on the prior works of Spady (1970) and T...
   So, how do we as educators identify these areas?      The answer is in the connection between the concepts of:       ...
   Things NOT to do during class:     1.   Say the words “drop” or “withdraw”;     2.   Come across as negative, bored, o...
   Classroom Management:        Maintaining accurate attendance records;        Following the institution’s attendance ...
   Classroom Leadership:        Effectively delivering the assigned curriculum and utilizing the books;        Asking e...
Engaging faculty and staff: An imperative for fostering  retention, advising, and smart borrowing. (2008). Round  Rock, TX...
Tinto, V. (1975). Dropout from higher education: A theoretical  synthesis of recent research. Review of Educational Resear...
Sample Faculty In-Service - December 2012
Sample Faculty In-Service - December 2012
Sample Faculty In-Service - December 2012
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Sample Faculty In-Service - December 2012

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Sample Faculty In-Service - December 2012

  1. 1.  ACICS = Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools; Annual Faculty Development Plan: ◦ Plan year runs April 1st through March 31st; ◦ 4 mandatory in-service sessions per year outlined on plan; ◦ 3 mandatory professional growth activities each of various “types” outlined on plan:  Professional growth “types” include related business experience, memberships, continuing education, professional writing, workshops, webinars, reading professional journals, etc.;  Remember to document your professional growth and submit evidence to your school chair or dean; ◦ 4 e-Campus courses per plan year.
  2. 2.  ACICS Data Sheet: ◦ Page 1 will only updated unless you have a major change in your personal information, acquire a new certificate, earn a new degree, etc.; ◦ Page 2 will be updated each quarter:  The table at the top contains your class schedule for the upcoming quarter;  Your school chair or dean will confirm the accuracy of this schedule. ◦ Complete the professional development information in the second half:  Methods courses or workshops during the past three years;  Conventions or educational meetings during the past three years;  Organizations and professional societies related to your position.
  3. 3.  Encourage 100% attendance from every student starting from day 1: ◦ Dean Smith sets this expectation when he speaks to incoming students at New Student Orientation… continue the message on day 1 in your classes; Encourage clear communication about attendance: ◦ Expect students to e-mail you and call you if they are going to miss class; ◦ Provide your students with good contact information and respond to your e-mails! The importance of accurate attendance: ◦ Print the class roster and make sure the date is visible; ◦ Have the students sign the roster within the first 30 minutes; ◦ Enter attendance into system within the first 30 minutes; ◦ Indicate on the roster which students have emailed you or called out; ◦ LRC staff will come by your classroom to collect the roster; ◦ Academic staff will call all absent students and document on roster and in system; ◦ Academic staff will return the roster to your classroom; ◦ It is still expected that you personally call and e-mail missing students; ◦ Turn the roster in to metal bin by the photocopier in the instructor’s office.
  4. 4.  Exercise:  “Why are you here?” Student engagement  Attendance = Retention  Remember the goal… 100%  Simple equation to keeping students engaged from day 1:  Strong bond with:  1 Administrator + 1 Instructor + 1 Student = Engagement  “Social integration of students increases the probability of academic and social success in the institution. If students are engaged, they are more likely to feel a part of … the college or university” (Spady, 1970).
  5. 5.  By the mid-70s, Tinto (1975) developed his model of Student Integration based on the prior work of Spady (1970):  Prior to admission to higher education institutions, students have already developed certain attributes conditioned by their upbringing;  They have also already developed certain academic and social skills and abilities throughout their experiences;  All of these experiences form what becomes the students goals, expectations, and level of commitment toward college, the workforce, and the world around them;  Once they are enrolled in the institution, there are many formal and informal activities that will have an impact on the students "integration" into the college, or lack thereof;  If the integration is strong, the student is more likely to decide to persist (be retained);  If the integration is weak, the student is more likely to decide to depart (to drop);  In many cases, students need to be reconditioned so they are better equipped to handle social situations and untaught so they are better equipped to handle academic situations!
  6. 6.  By the mid-90s, Swail (1996) developed a model for student retention based on the prior works of Spady (1970) and Tinto (1975):  The student comes to the college with characteristics across two distinct lines – cognitive and social;  These aspects define very distinctly the students strengths and weaknesses in academic and social situations;  The institution, at all levels, then has the ability to identify these areas and better meet the needs of the student so that he or she is able to succeed.  What are the cognitive and social lines of the Swail model?  How do we as educators identify these areas?
  7. 7.  So, how do we as educators identify these areas?  The answer is in the connection between the concepts of:  Social integration  Persistence/retention  Engagement 1. We have to make sure students are attending classes as regularly as possible with the goal being 100% ; 2. We have to make sure that students are forming strong connections with administrators, faculty, and fellow students; 3. We may have to recondition students to certain social situations and unteach certain academic behaviors; 4. We must get to know our students…
  8. 8.  Things NOT to do during class: 1. Say the words “drop” or “withdraw”; 2. Come across as negative, bored, or disengaged; 3. Read from your slides and stand stationary; 4. Arrive late and/or unprepared. Things TO do during class: 1. Call students by their names often; 2. Build accountability and buy-in from day 1; 3. Teach interactively and reach multiple learning styles; 4. Manage and lead your class with confidence…
  9. 9.  Classroom Management:  Maintaining accurate attendance records;  Following the institution’s attendance policies;  Maintaining accurate grades for all students;  Returning graded work to students in a timely manner;  Distributing progress reports at weeks 3, 6, and 9;  Writing your agenda on the board every class period;  Controlling any noise, chatter, and discipline problems;  Immediately reporting and documenting instances of plagiarism;  Controlling the “Grand Central Station” effect;  These are maintenance-related activities!
  10. 10.  Classroom Leadership:  Effectively delivering the assigned curriculum and utilizing the books;  Asking effective questions of all students using appropriate techniques;  Pressing students for engaging feedback to ensure they “get it”;  Providing solid feedback to students that motivates them to dig deeper;  Switching gears enough that students do not become disengaged;  Developing interesting field trips and inviting special guest speakers;  Building confidence in your students by having them speak in public;  Assisting students with adapting to changing classroom conditions;  Leading in a way that presents you as an expert in the field;  These are leadership qualities that help you mentor and empower! Social integration  Persistence/retention  Engagement
  11. 11. Engaging faculty and staff: An imperative for fostering retention, advising, and smart borrowing. (2008). Round Rock, TX: Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.tgslc.org/pdf/EngagingFaculty.pdfSpady, W. G. (1970). Dropouts from higher education: An interdisciplinary review and synthesis. Interchange, 1(1), 65- 85.Swail, W. S. (2004). The art of student retention: A handbook for practitioners and administrators. Education Policy Institute, Retrieved from http://www.educationalpolicy.org/pdf/ART.pdfSwail, W. S., Redd, K., and Perna, L. (2003). Retaining minority students in higher education. An ASHE-ERIC Reader. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  12. 12. Tinto, V. (1975). Dropout from higher education: A theoretical synthesis of recent research. Review of Educational Research, 45(1), 89-125.Tinto, V. (1993). Leaving college. The University of Chicago Press: Chicago, IL.

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