13 pasta & polenta

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13 pasta & polenta

  1. 1. Grains • Cornmeal, polenta, grits, hominy, masa • Popcorn, husks used for tamales • GMOs and plant modifications • Wheat – hard and soft wheat • Gluten proteins, gliadin, glutenin • Gives structure to breads Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Grains are the edible seeds of various grasses • Corn – native to North and South America
  2. 2. Pasta • Made from various types of finely milled grains = flour • Provides structure without too much elasticity • Less gluten proteins • Dried vs. fresh • Shapes Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Rice, buckwheat, whole wheat, refined wheat • Italian pasta made from Durham wheat • Semolina is the course meal of Durham wheat
  3. 3. Pasta Shapes • Ribbons • Fettuccini, lasagna, spaghetti, capellini • Tubes • Shaped • Farfalle, fusilli, rotelle, orzo • Filled pasta • Ravioli, tortellini, agnolatti • Egg doodles and pasta without egg Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Manicotti, ziti, penne, rigatoni
  4. 4. • The shape of the pasta is used to determine the type of sauce to pair with it. • Pasta is the vehicle to get the sauce to the mouth • Ribbons used for rich tomato or creamy thick sauces • Tubes are used for thinner meat or vegetable sauces or baked in a cassarole • Shapes are used for thinner meat or oil based sauces Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Why different shapes of Pasta
  5. 5. Polenta or Grits • Italian polenta is made from a particular variety of corn usually ground to a coarse meal • Grits are either white or yellow and a staple dish in southern united states • Can be hard or soft • Can be made with water, stock or milk Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • A porridge made from ground corn
  6. 6. • Pesto is a preserving method for fresh herbs • Due to the amount of oil you must be careful when storing pesto or clostridium botulinum may grow • Various herbs and plant tops may be used to make pesto • Utilize water from cooking the pasta to thin pesto out and distribute more evenly over pasta Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Pesto
  7. 7. Other Sauces • Tomato sauces • Cream sauces • Traditionally cream is not used for sauce in Italy • Cheese, butter, egg & pasta water • Oil based sauces & other sauces • Simple garlic & oil • Diced vegetables and oil Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder • Fresh & hearty • Meaty or vegetarian • Chunky or smooth
  8. 8. • Dried pastas are cooked to el dente (to the tooth) • Fresh pasta cook quickly and never become hard enough to be el dente • Fresh pasta must be refrigerated • Shocking and oiling pasta, how & when • Holding pasta Chef Michael Scott Lead Chef Instructor AESCA Boulder Overview

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