Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Wainfleet Conservation Areas Master Plan

1,541 views

Published on

The purpose of this Master Plan is to prepare a long-term plan to guide the development and operation of four NPCA owned properties along the Lake Erie shoreline within the Township of Wainfleet, that respects the natural heritage of the sites, provides recreational opportunities for the public, protects the natural resources of Lake Erie, and works towards achieving a self-sustaining operating model.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Wainfleet Conservation Areas Master Plan

  1. 1. WAINFLEET CONSERVATION AREAS MASTER PLAN NIAGARA PENINSULA CONSERVATION AUTHORITY DRAFT
  2. 2. Project Team Pierre Chauvin, MA, MCIP, RPP, MHBC Planning – Project Lead Mitchell Avis, MSc, MCIP, RPP, MHBC Planning Andrea Sinclair, MUDS, MCIP, RPP, MHBC Planning Greg Johnstone, BLA, OALA, CSLA, MHBC Planning Nathan Zrini, BAA, MHBC Planning Jon Linton, TCI Consulting Dr. Bronwynne Wilton, PhD, Synthesis (Facilitator) Acknowledgments The project team would like to thank the contributions from the following Staff and members of the Steering Committee: Mark Brickell, NPCA Gregg Furtney, NPCA Adam Christie, NPCA Mayor April Jeffs, Township of Wainfleet Michael Smith, Township of Wainfleet Richard Nan, Township of Wainfleet Sarah Ivins, Township of Wainfleet Joan Davison, Resident Anne McKibbon, Resident
  3. 3. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) owns and operates numerous properties/conservation area in Niagara Region and portions of the City of Hamilton. Five of these properties are located within the Township of Wain- fleet – four of which are located adjacent to Lake Erie and Lakeshore Road. MacNaughton Hermsen Britton Clarkson Planning Limited (MHBC) and TCI Management Consultants (TCI) were retained by the NPCA to prepare Master Plans for the following properties: 1. Long Beach Conservation Area; 2. ‘Lakewood’Property (former Easter Seals Camp); 3. Morgan’s Point Conservation Area; and the 4. Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry. The purpose of these Master Plans is to prepare a long-term plan to guide the development and operation of the four NPCA owned properties that respects the natural heritage of the sites, provides recreational opportunities for the pub- lic, protects the natural resources of Lake Eire and works towards achieving a self-sustaining operating model. The Master Plans were supported by a comprehensive public consultation program, which included stakeholder and public meetings, online and paper surveys. A steering committee was also formed comprised of Conservation Author- ity and Township staff, the Mayor of Wainfleet, the project team and two members of the public. More detailed results of this consultation are included within this Master Plan. Based on the public input and background review conducted through the Master Plan process, four general areas of improvement emerged for each property: 1. Branding & Image; 2. Physical Improvements; 3. Natural Improvements; and 4. Recreation
  4. 4. As a result, over 50 recommendations have been provided under these four general areas of improvement for each of the four properties included within this Master Plan. Implementation of the recommendations is proposed to be carried out by establish- ing short (2-5 years) term; medium term (5-10 years) and long term (10+ years) goals. In addition, several strategic actions are also recommended, which are intended to be general recommendations that apply to all four properties. Cost estimates to implement the Master Plans at each property are also provided and range between 1.9 Million to 3.6 Million per property: A Market, Financial and Economic Impact Analysis accompanies this Master Plan and is included as an Appendix. This report as- sesses the market context within which these Master Plans will take place and provides a financial analysis of the feasibility and sustainability of the various Master Plans. Included in this analysis is an overview of the capital and operating cost implications of the Master Plan proposals for each property. Two options are presented including a‘base case’scenario, which shows a deficit of $273,000 in a typical year of operation, and a‘break even’scenario, which shows a small surplus in a typical year of operation. Each of the four NPCA owned properties included in this Master Plan are unique. Given the unique character of each property, the proposed uses and management of each property is different based on different themes/programming objectives. As a result, the level of proposed activity and use varies by property. Together, the four properties offer great opportunity to benefit the immedi- ate community, the Region and the NPCA.
  5. 5. 1. Introduction 5. Strategic Actions2. Context 3. Planning Context 4. Consultation 6. Long Beach Conservation Area TABLE OF CONTENTS
  6. 6. 7.“Lakewood” Property 8. Morgan’s Point 9. Wainfleet Wetlands and Quarry 10. Economic Impact 11. Conclusions
  7. 7. 1 INTRODUCTION The Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) was established in 1959 and encompasses the entire Niagara Region and portions of the City of Hamilton and Haldimand County. The legislative mandate of the NPCA, as set out in the Conservation Authorities Act, is to establish and undertake programs designed to further the conservation, restoration, development and management of natural resources. The NPCA owns and operates numerous properties/conservation areas in Niagara Region. Five of these properties are located within the Township of Wainfleet – four of which are located adjacent to Lake Erie and Lakeshore Road and subject to this Master Plan. Two of the four properties have been in the NPCA’s ownership for decades while the other properties are relatively recent acquisitions. Master Plans were completed in 1993 for the Wainfleet WetlandsandLongBeachConservationAreas.Theremainingtwopropertieshavenevergone throughaMasterPlanprocess.Eachpropertyisuniqueanddifferentintermsofuse,physical environment and natural environment. The following Master Plans have been developed in consultationwithNPCAstafftheSteeringCommitteeaswellfrominputreceivedfromthepublic. In order to assist with the preparation of the Master Plans, the NPCA retained MacNaughton Hermsen Britton Clarkson Planning Limited (MHBC) and TCI Management Consultants (TCI). The Master Plans are intended to provide a long term framework for the use and management of the four conservation areas owned by the NPCA and located within the Township of Wainfleet: Long Beach Conservation Area; “Lakewood” (former Easter Seals) Property; Morgan’s Point Conservation Area; and Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry.
  8. 8. The purpose of this Master Plan is to prepare a long-term plantoguidethedevelopmentandoperationoffourNPCA owned properties along the Lake Erie shoreline within the Township of Wainfleet, that respects the natural heritage of the sites, provides recreational opportunities for the public, protects the natural resources of Lake Erie, and workstowardsachievingaself-sustainingoperatingmodel. It is important to note that this Master Plan does not include a comprehensive inventory or analysis of the natural heritage features on each site. Further study will be required to evaluate the natural heritage features on each property and the potential impacts or mitigating measures associated with the implementation of some of the recommendations of this Master Plan. The recommendations of this Master Plan are still subject to final ecological and water resource assessments. The following objectives were established by the NPCA in order to achieve the purpose of the study: 1. Determine the future direction for the development and operation of the four NPCA properties and provide a five-year implementation plan and a ten-year development plan for the operation of these sites, individually and linked together. The sites need to complement each other. 2. Outline appropriate phases to be implemented to achieve optimum development. 3. Outline the operational costs and capital cost estimates to implement the 5 and 10 year plan. 4. Identify funding sources. Purpose and Objectives
  9. 9. Master Plan Process A Master Plan is a comprehensive document , long-range in its view, that is intended to guide the use and development of the subject properties for the planning horizon. It is intended to be a general plan for the future use of the properties - a blueprint for the future. A Master Plan is a reflection of the community’s vision for the future and therefore, community input is an essential component of the Master Planning process to ensure the Plan reflects the opinions of the community. This Master Plan process was undertaken in three phases: PHASE 1: Background Research/Data Collection/Market Analysis The first phase consisted of a comprehensive review of all relevant background materials and site visits of the 4 properties. An online survey was also used to obtain public input. In addi- tion, an open house was conducted with stakeholders and the public. PHASE 2: Develop Concepts for Each Property The second phase involved the creation of development concepts for each property based on input received from Phase 1. The concepts were reviewed with NPCA staff, the Steering Committee and presented at a public meeting for feedback and further input. PHASE 3: Prepare Master Plan and Market Analysis The third phase involved the preparation of the Master Plan based on input from staff, the Steering Committee and the public. The Master Plan identifies a preferred option for each property and prioritizes implementation of the actions/recom- mendations for each site. A Market/Financial Analysis was also completed to assess the financial and economic impact of the Master Plans. 1 2 3 AUGUST 2016 MHBC and TCI retained by NPCA. Startup Meeting and initial site visits.
  10. 10. Project Timeline AUGUST 2016 Survey Launch. OCTOBER 2016 Site visits and photo documentation. SEPT-OCT 2016 Background Review. NOVEMBER 2016 Final surveys collected. DEC 2016 / JAN 2017 Prepare Master Plans for each property. Present draft concepts to Steering Committee. FEBRUARY 2017 Present draft Master Plans at public meeting in Wainfleet, ON. MARCH 2017 Prepare Draft Master Plan Document. APRIL 2017 Steering Committee Meeting. Public Meeting to present draft Master Plan. END OF APRIL / EARLY MAY 2017 Finalize Master Plan. NOVEMBER 2016 Facilitated Public and Stakeholder meeting. JUNE 2017 Approval of Master Plan by NPCA Board.
  11. 11. LAKESHORE ROAD FEEDER ROAD WEST QUARRIE ROAD RATHFONROAD GOLF COURSEROAD BURNABYROAD GORD HARRY CONSERVATION TRAIL DIXIEROAD RATTLERROAD WILSONROAD DIXIEROAD MALOWANY ROAD GARRINGER ROADABBEY ROAD STATIONROAD SIDEROAD20 BRAWNROAD PETERSONROAD BRAWNROAD DALEYDITCHROAD CONCESSION 1 ROAD MINORROAD BURKETTROAD BESSEYROAD ERIEPEATROAD LAKESHORE ROAD P WAINFLEET WETLANDS MORGAN‛S POINT LAKEWOOD 3 3 3 3 3 LONG BEACH PORT COLBORNE COUNTRY CLUB LAKE ERIE STATION ROAD NATURALIZATION PARK 28 WAINFLEET
  12. 12. 2 CONTEXT The four properties included in this Master Plan are located within the Township of Wainfleet. The Township of Wainfleet is a rural municipality located in Niagara Region on the northern shores of Lake Erie. In 2016, the population of the Township of Wainfleet grew to 6,372 people, a reversal on the population decline experienced between 2006 and 2011.
  13. 13. The Township is a relatively small municipality that is within driving distance to several large urban centres within the Golden Horseshoe. The Lake Erie shoreline is a prominent feature in the Township and is a significant tourist attraction. The Township has a high proportion of seasonal households (cottages). In fact, some of the recent population growth may have resulted from the conversion of seasonal cottages to permanent residences. The Township of Wainfleet is bordered by the City of Port Colborne to the east (population: 18,306), City of Welland to the east (population: 52,293), Town of Pelham to the north (population: 17,110), Township of West Lincoln to the north (population: 14,500), County of Haldimand to the west (population: 45,608) and Lake Erie to the South. The Township of Wainfleet is conveniently located approximately 45 kilometres (35 minutes by car) to the Peace Bridge; the gateway to the United States of America. The four properties that are the subject of this Master Plan are located relatively close to each other in the Township. All properties are directly connected by Lakeshore Road and indirectly by the Gord Harry Conservation Trail, a rail trail owned by the NPCA that spans the entire length of the Township from east to west. The following is a brief summary of the four properties. Buffalo, NY Niagara Falls, ON Hamilton Port Colborne Welland St. Catharines Toronto Wainfleet Region of Niagara U.S.A Lake Ontario Lake Erie 30 Minutes 60 Minutes 120 Minutes LOCATION OF WAINFLEET WITHIN THE BROADER REGIONAL CONTEXT
  14. 14. LAKESHORE ROAD LAKE ERIE BURKETTRD LAKESHORE RD LAKE ERIE TRAVERRD LONG BEACH CONSERVATION AREA The NPCA has owned and operated the Long Beach Conservation Area since 1961. The Conservation Area is 56 ha (139 acres) in size and contains a seasonal campground with 225 serviced and unserviced campsites as well as a day-use park which is open from Victoria Day until Labour Day. Access to the property is controlled by a staffed gate/gatehouse. The property is bisected by Lakeshore Road and has beach access to Lake Erie. An existing boat launch on Lake Erie is also available at this site. A significant portion of the lands on the north side of Lakeshore Road is treed. For more details on the Long Beach Conservation Area, see Section 6 of this report. LAKEWOOD (FORMER EASTER SEALS) PROPERTY This property was purchased in 2014 by the NPCA from the former EasterSealsCamp.Forthepurposeofthisreportthispropertyisreferred to as the ‘Lakewood property”. The property is 6 hectares (15 acres) in size and has approximately 159 metres (521 feet) of beach access. The lands are currently vacant/partially vegetated with no infrastructure or structures. The lands have access to, and frontage on, Lakeshore Road. For more details on the Lakewood Property, see Section 7 of this report.
  15. 15. Figure 2.3 - Aerial with Red Out- line Wainfleet Wetlands GORD HARRY CONSERVATION TRAIL LAKE ERIE LAKE ERIE GORD HARRY CONSERVATION TRAIL QUARRIERD CEMENTRD BESSEYRD LAKESHORE RD W PORT COLBORNE LAKESHORE RD W 1:1000 MORGAN‛SPOINTROAD LAKEERIE MORGAN’S POINT CONSERVATION AREA Morgan’s Point Conservation Area is 3.9 hectares (9.6 acres) in size and contains an existing parking lot, washroom facility, playground and a partial boardwalk. The property was transferred to the NPCA from the Township in 2001. A significant portion of the property consists of a hardwood forest with several informal trails. The gates to the property are opened and closed daily. The property is located along the Lake Erie shoreline, and given its location on the shoreline offers exceptional views of the lake. Unlike the other shoreline properties owned by the NPCA, the beach predominately consists of bedrock. For more details on the Morgan’s Point Conservation Area, see Section 8 of this report. WAINFLEET WETLANDS/QUARRY The Wainfleet Wetland/Quarry property was purchased by the NPCA in 1978. Prior to NPCA’s purchase, the property was operated as a clay and limestone quarry until it ceased operation in the 1960’s. The property is 185 hectares (458 acres) in size and is largely comprised of naturalized areas. The Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry property is located immediately south of, and abutting, the Gord Harry Trail, which is a significant trail corridor owned/managed by the NPCA and spans the entire width of the Township from east to west. For more details on the Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry, see Section 9 of this report.
  16. 16. 3 PLANNING CONTEXT The following provides a brief review of some of the relevant planning documents that helps inform/support the Master Plan. NIAGARA PENINSULA CONSERVATION AUTHORITY STRATEGIC PLAN The Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority (NPCA) Strategic Plan 2014-2017 outlines their strategic direction over the four year period. The Strategic Plan identifies the need for sustainable infrastructure management as a key challenge. This Master Plan supports the NPCA Strategic Plan by proposing the sustainable management of four NPCA-owned properties in Wainfleet. The NPCA’s mission is “to manage our watershed’s natural resources by balancing environmental, community, and economic needs”. Their vision is “balancing conservation and sustainable development for future generations by engaging landowners, stakeholders and communities through collaboration”.
  17. 17. NIAGARA REGION OFFICIAL PLAN The Niagara Region Official Plan titled ‘Imagine Niagara’ presents a 20-year vision to guide the physical, economic and social development of the Region. The Official Plan recognizes the importance of tourism as part of the economic base in the Region and acknowledges the excellent beaches, camping facilities, amusement areas, and summer cottages along the Lake Erie shoreline. The Official Plan also recognizes the importance of a healthy natural environment. This Master Plan is consistent with the Region’s direction to encourage tourism activities along the Lake Erie shoreline while also promoting a healthy natural environment. NIAGARA LAKEFRONT ENHANCEMENT STRATEGY The Niagara Lakefront Enhancement Strategy was prepared in 2014. The purpose of the Enhancement Strategy is to guide a range of intergovernmental partnerships to enhance public access to, and experiences of, the shorelines of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie in the Niagara Region. The Niagara Peninsula Conservation Authority is identified as a partner to implement the Strategy. Several potential strategies are identified in the document, which is intended to provide partners with ideas on the types of lakefront enhancement strategies that align with the vision, goals and objectives of the Lakefront Enhancement Strategy. The Master Plans developed for the four NPCA owned properties advances several strategies identified within the Lakefront Enhancement Strategy including: • Enhancing and expanding an existing lakefront asset • Creating a new lakefront destination/attraction • Improving the trail network • Providing lakefront access and trail way-finding and signage WAINFLEET OFFICIAL PLAN The Wainfleet Official Plan is a municipal policy document that states the local Council’s vision for the Township over a 20-year planning horizon. The Township’s vision includes that: “Wainfleet residents and visitors enjoy its natural environment amenities, and appreciate the outdoor recreational activities it offers. Its diverse natural heritage system, wildlife, beaches and shoreline will be respected, protected and enhanced. Access, accessibility, and public amenities will be improved so thatmanywillappreciatetheTownship’snaturalbeauty.” The Official Plan aims to protect significant natural heritage features and functions for their ecological benefit, contribution to human health, and to preserve the natural heritage features of the Township of Wainfleet. One of the themes of the Official Plan is improving public access to the waterfront. Government agencies are encouraged to assist in the purchase of waterfront lands to improve public access opportunities. This Master Plan is consistent with the Township’s vision and policy direction of improving public access to the waterfront while maintaining and enhancing the natural environment.
  18. 18. WAINFLEET RECREATION MASTER PLAN In 2011 the Township of Wainfleet approved a Recreation Master Plan, which focuses on outdoor parks, open spaces and community trail resources; recreation facilities and services; and culture resources provided by the Township. The intent of the Master Plan is to guide parks and recreation development over a 10-year planning horizon and provide recommendations on the creation of a balanced array of parks and recreation services. The Recreation Master Plan recognizes the importance of Lake Erie shorelineaccessforbothlocalrecreationandtourismuse. Inresponse tothedirectionintheRecreationMasterPlan,thisMasterPlansupports improving shoreline access for both recreation and tourism use. TOWNSHIP OF WAINFLEET STRATEGIC PLAN In 2017, the Township of Wainfleet released their Strategic Plan which establishes the following vision statement for the Township: “The Township of Wainfleet will be a sustainable rural community that offers outstanding quality of life for all”. The Strategic Plan identifies three main goals as well as specific action items. The adjacent list summarizes goals and actions that relate to this Master Plan process. This Master Plan supports the actions and goals of the Township’s Strategic Plan by creating a vision and development plan for the four NPCA properties connected by Lakeshore Road and Lake Erie and improving the signage/way-finding signage for visitors and residents of the Township. TOWNSHIP STRATEGIC PLAN DIRECTIONS AND ACTIONS Community Stewardship: “Our goal is to retain and enhance the characteristics – physical and social – that make Wainfleet such a special place to live.” Actions: “Develop a community-wide vision of what we want the lake front to be, for residents and for visitors.” “Improve the signage and way-finding signage that identifies and welcomes travelers and residents to Wainfleet.” Communication and Engagement: “Our goal is to better communicate with residents, external partners, other levels of government, and the public at large to engage them in making Wainfleet a vital, desirable place to live, work and play.” Actions: “Explore a variety of ways to communicate with residents and engage them in municipal life.” “Highlight marketing opportunities for Township of Wainfleet tourism, agriculture, real estate, business and recreation.”
  19. 19. 4 CONSULTATION A key component to the development of this Master Plan was communityengagementtounderstandtheneedsandopinionsofthe public and stakeholders for each of the four NPCA properties within theTownshipofWainfleet.Assuch,avarietyofconsultationmethods were used to engage the public including a facilitated stakeholder meeting, handouts, paper and online survey and public meetings.
  20. 20. STAKEHOLDER MEETING A stakeholder meeting was held on November 3, 2016 in the afternoon at the Firefighter’s Memorial Hall in Wainfleet. Stakeholders were identified by the NPCA and Township of Wainfleet. In total, approximately 15 people attended the stakeholdermeeting.Stakeholdersrepresentedincludedstaff from the NPCA and the Township, as well as representatives from local businesses and recreation providers. The stakeholder meeting was intended to obtain feedback on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the four NPCA properties and understand the stakeholder’s opinions regarding their future use. PUBLIC MEETINGS PublicMeetingswereheldonNovember3,2016andFebruary 8, 2017. The purpose of these meetings was to introduce the project to the public and obtain feedback on how they would like the properties to be developed. At the second public meeting, concept plans were presented and feedback was obtained. In total, 70 people attended these public meetings. SURVEYS A survey was also conducted targeting all residents within the Township of Wainfleet as well as residents outside the Township who use the NPCA properties or who would use the NPCA properties. The survey was administered online and through paper surveys. Paper surveys were distributed at the Township of Wainfleet Municipal Office. The electronic surveywasdistributedonlinethroughtheNPCAandTownship websitesaswellassocialmediaaccounts. Intotal,168responses to the survey were received from August to November, 2016. It is recognized that the survey results are not statistically significant, however, they do help provide a better understanding of the demographics of visitors, the geographic range of the user-base of each property, and ultimately assisted in corroborating the feedback received through the public meetings and stakeholder engagement. WHERE SURVEY PARTICIPANTS LIVE Number of Attendes for Public Meetings 70 Survey Responses Buffalo, NY Niagara Falls, ON Hamilton Toronto Wainfleet 56% Region of Niagara 29% U.S.A 6% Elsewhere in Canada: 5% Lake Ontario Lake Erie Morg Wai Most Visits
  21. 21. Out of the 168 survey responses, 56% reside within the Township of Wainfleet, 29% live elsewhere in Ni- agara Region, 6% are from the United States of Amer- ica, 5% are from elsewhere in Canada and 4% were unidentified. Users of the subject properties are not restricted to residents of the Township but attract users from the greater Niagara Region and abroad. Part of the survey looked at understanding how aware respondents were of each subject property. Respon- dents were most aware of the Long Beach Conserva- tion Area while being least aware of the Lakewood property. Respondents were also asked how frequent- ly they (or members of their household) used each of the subject properties. Morgan’s Point was the most frequently visited site, which speaks to the fact that it acts as a community park for the surrounding area. The “Lakewood”property is the least frequented. These results are not surprising, considering the Lakewood property is currently vacant and undeveloped. Aware- ness of each property will need to be addressed as these properties are programmed. Public awareness will help ensure the success of these Conservation Areas in terms of attracting tourists/visitors to the Lake Erie shoreline. Public awareness of these prop- erties will also help in the education and manage- ment of natural resources present at each property. 73%
  22. 22. 1 Improved Beach Cleanliness Longbeach Improved Beach Improved Water Quality Washroom and Shower Facilities Better day use facilities 2 3 4 5 1Improved Beach Cleanliness Improved Water Quality Improved Beach Cleanliness Additonal Walking Trails Better linkage of NPCA Waterfront Additional Hiking Trails “Lakewood” Morgan’s Point Better linkage of NPCA Waterfront Points Improved Water Quality Washroom and Shower Facilities Better day use facilities 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 Improved Parking Additional Walking Trails Improved day use facilities Additional Hiking Trails Improved Water Quality Wainfleet Wetlands and Quarry 1 2 3 4 5 As part of the survey, respondents were asked how desirable listed improvements would be for the subject property they visited or used most frequently.The image above summarizes the top 5 most desirable improvements for each property. Improved beach cleanliness and improved water quality were highly desirable improvements for all three properties along the Lake Erie shoreline. Meanwhile, the most desirable im- provement at the Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry property was parking. When asked if the improvements noted above were to be made, 73% of survey respondents indicated that they would use the NPCA properties more often. MOST DESIRED IMPROVEMENTS
  23. 23. Survey respondents were also asked their opinion on the various opportunities to fund the improvements they iden- tified as being desirable. Respondents are most supportive of the NPCA pursuing corporate partnerships, sponsorships and naming rights as a funding source. Respondents are least supportive of paying more in property taxes to fund the im- provements. Only the Long Beach Conservation Area cur- rently charges fees to use the property. Just over half (53%) of respondents said they would not support paying user fees at NPCA properties where fees do not currently exist. With added investment into the NPCA properties, they may become more attractive for visitors and guests to the Town- ship. The survey asked how active the NPCA, the Township of Wainfleet and economic development agencies should be about promoting the Township as a waterfront destination. In total, 75% of respondents said improved waterfront facili- ties should be part of a tourism strategy to attract more visi- tors to Wainfleet. There is the potential for these properties to become local and regional recreation and tourist attractions. The biggest barriers survey respondents identified to using the NPCA properties included: they do not have enough time; the lack of cleanliness/maintenance of facilities; and, they do not know what is available at the properties. Respondents were also given an opportunity to write-in additional barriers, which included: lack of cleanliness of beaches; poor water quality; and not well advertised/promoted. Again, beach cleanliness and water quality were common themes identified with these properties. The issue of advertising and promoting the sites is something that can be addressed through this Master Plan. The survey responses and comments from the public and stakeholder meetings were considered and incorporated in the development of this Master Plan.
  24. 24. 5 STRATEGIC ACTIONS The Master Plans presented in the following sections (Sections 6 through 9) outline the ultimate development plans for each of the four NPCA properties. The Master Plans in these following sections recommend improve- ments based on four broad themes. These include the following: BRANDING & IMAGE PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS NATURAL IMPROVEMENTS RECREATION Although connected by Lakeshore Road and Lake Erie, each of the four properties are unique and are proposed to be managed based on different programming objectives and intended uses. In each of the following sections, the intendedprogrammingofthepropertiesisidentified,whichformsthefoundationforthevariousrecommendations/ actions of the proposed Master Plans. The Master Plans for each site also includes an Implementation Plan which provides estimated costs for the various actions/recommendations of each property along with implementation phased over ten years. At a macro scale, these properties can function interdependently. One of the objectives of this Master Plan develops a plan or strategy for how the sites can complement each other. As a result, the strategic actions outlined in this section apply to all properties. Describes actions to develop consistent branding and imaging. Describes actions to make physical improvements, which will result in new buildings/structures or infrastructure Describes actions to make natural improvements to the site, which includes plantings and landscaping. Describes actions to introduce new or improved ways to provide opportunities for recreation programming.
  25. 25. Strategic Actions CONSISTENT BRANDING The NPCA should work with Niagara Region and the Township of Wainfleet to develop an over arching and consistent brand for the four NPCA properties. Branding should be used to deliver a consistent message to the community and symbolically connect the four properties. This brand could also be extended to other NPCA, Township, or Regionally owned properties along the Lakeshore. The NPCA needs to understand its ‘brand’ before a marketing/communicationsplancanbecompletedsuchthatitis consistent with the NPCA’s overall marketing plan and reflective of the Conservation Authorities mission statement/mandate. MARKETING PLAN AND COMMUNICATIONS In accordance with standard practices, the NPCA should develop a marketing plan and communications strategy. When brand, marketing and communication strategies are in-sync, great things happen. The NPCA should develop an interactive, innovative and community-driven marketing strategy specific to recreation, sport and culture on the subject lands. COLLABORATION AND PARTNERSHIPS Partnership arrangements are becoming increasingly important and prevalent in the delivery of recreational services. The NPCA should explore and utilize both private and not-for- profit partnerships to deliver facilities and services wherever financially viable.The NPCA should also investigate collaborative opportunitieswithNiagaraRegionandtheTownshipofWainfleet to realize the full development plans of these properties. These partnership opportunities could be used to build/install services or implement/ deliver programs and services (e.g. private recreation businesses) on the subject lands. ENCOURAGE VOLUNTEERISM Building on the collaboration and partnerships recommendation, volunteers in recreation make an extremely valuable contribution to community cohesiveness, Canadian society and the economy. The NPCA should explore and expand volunteer opportunities with not- for-profit organizations, schools and service clubs. Volunteerism will not only assist with maintaining the properties, but can also help encourage community ownership and civic pride. FEE STRUCTURE At present, only Long Beach Conservation Area has a daily user fee. As a result of the proposed Master Plans, user fees should also be considered for the Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry and Lakewood properties in order to ensure the long-term sustainability of the uses at these properties. Wainfleet residents will have preferred user fees and may not even pay user fees on some properties (for example, on “Lakewood” or Morgan’s Point). The NPCA should also consider a fee structure where users can pay one fee for access to all of the Wainfleet properties. OTHER REVENUE STREAMS The NPCA should explore other ways to develop revenue on the properties, where appropriate, through public-private partnerships, naming rights and sponsorship. Opportunities for a partnership with local recreation companies to deliver services, sporting activities/ events and pavilion rentals for gatherings or community events should be continually explored.
  26. 26. NAMING THE “LAKEWOOD” PROPERTY Throughout this Master Plan, the former Easter Seals property is called the “Lakewood” property. At present, this property has no identifying name. It is therefore recommended that the NPCA establish a community engagement process to assist with formally naming the property. PRIORITIZING DEVELOPMENT OF PROPERTIES The following sections provide a number of strategic actions/ recommendations for all four properties. The NPCA should prioritize the implementation of these actions based on the following order: 1. “Lakewood”Property 2. Wainfleet Wetlands and Quarry 3. Morgan’s Point Conservation Area 4. Long Beach Conservation Area Development should proceed as capital is made available. FUNDING SOURCES The NPCA should explore alternative funding sources so that the Conservation Authority does not bear the entire cost of development. Alternative funding sources include capital fundraising campaigns (some of the more discrete and tangible items may be fundable by outside sponsors and foundations or by fundraising campaigns oriented towards the general public), private sector investment (e.g. the proposed “walk in the trees”/ zip line could be paid for and operated by a private operator) and public sector grants (Federal and Provincial funding programs).
  27. 27. 6 LONG BEACH CONSERVATION AREA Long Beach Conservation Area (“Long Beach”) is located on the northern shore of Lake Erie in the southwestern corner of theTown- ship ofWainfleet.The property is 56 hectares (139 acres) in size with beach access.The property is bisected by Lakeshore Road (Regional Road 3) such that 13 hectares (33 acres) are located south of the road (adjacent to the lake) while 43 hectares (106 acres) are located on the north side. Long Beach has been owned and operated by the NPCA since April, 1961.
  28. 28. Existing Conditions Long Beach Long Beach Conservation Area is an existing campground and day use park. Of the four properties included in this Master Plan, Long Beach is the only property which charges a user fee. The property is bisected by Lakeshore Road, with the majority of the activity directed to the lands adjacent to the Lake Erie shoreline. The property features 225 seasonal and overnight campsites on both sides of Lakeshore Road. A gatehouse is located at the entrance, which is limited in size but does contain some retail and convenience items. Two comfort stations exist on the south side of Lakeshore Road, which contain washrooms and showers. An older playground, swing set, basketball court and volleyball court are all in need of replacement/upgrades. A prominent feature and attraction of this property is the beach. There are severalstairaccesspointstothebeach,whichareinneedofrepair.Thewater quality at the beach is often a concern and beach closures are a common occurrence. A boat launch, consisting of a concrete slab, exists at the east end of the site. Water levels at the boat launch are generally very shallow, thereby limiting the size of boats that can be launched. Overflow camping, a maintenance yard, sewage lagoons and some recreational trails are located north of Lakeshore Road. The majority of the lands north of Lakeshore Road comprise of forest/plantation. A Master Plan for Long Beach Conservation Area was prepared in 1982 and updated in 1993. The original Master Plan recommended additional campsites on both sides of Lakeshore Road, including group camping on the north side of the road; a new pump-house; two comfort stations to service the new campsites; gatehouse addition; possibility for a laundromat and/or variety store; a residence for the superintendent; more landscaping; beach improvements and a fitness trail. The purpose of the Master Plan in 1993 was to conduct an inventory of the status of the Conservation Area and make recommendations for wildlife management and forest management.
  29. 29. BURKETTRD LAKESHORE RD LAKE ERIE TRAVERRD 15 1. Waste management facility 2. Trailhead 3. Campsites 4. Comfort station 5. Garbage collection 6. Entrance feature 7. Gate house 8. Plantation/woodlot 9. Playground 10. Basketball court 11. Volleyball court 12. Boat launch 13. Beach 14. Pavilions 15. Beach access 16. Former baseball diamond /overflow parking SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 53 9 10 12 13 16 11 15 15 8 14 4
  30. 30. 1. Entrance feature and signage to the property needs to be enhanced to clearly identify the park and attract vis- itors. Signage and entrance details on the north side of Lakeshore Road should also be enhanced to promote the activities on lands north of Lakeshore Road. Consideration should be given to improving the cross walk and imple- menting traffic calming to slow vehicular traffic and pro- mote pedestrian traffic between the north and south sides of the park. This may require collaborating with the Town- ship in order to implement. 2. Provide updated and consistent way-finding signage throughout the park to direct visitors to the various components of the conservation area (e.g. beach, camping, parking etc.). 3. The existing camp site demarcation posts should be re- placed and upgraded to ensure they are consistently demarcated both on the north and the south sides of the park. 4. New trailhead mapping, consistent signage and markers should be incorporated into the new trail design in the northern woodlot. Opportunities for educational and interpretive signage should also be considered. 5. The existing gate house and parking around the gate house should be upgraded, and at a minimum, ensure Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) compliance. Con- sider incorporating a concession / store into a new / renovat- ed gatehouse. Landscape enhancements should be consid- ered around the entrance gate and parking area to further enhance the visitor experience. 6. Existing open areas north of Lakeshore Road and opposite the existing camping area can be designed and planned for group camping facilities in order to enhance and expand the range of camping opportunities / experiences at the park. For the purposes of this Master Plan we have assumed that a minimum of 8 group camping sites can be accommodated. Group camping could be marketed to schools for retreats and overnight trips geared towards outdoor and environmental educational opportunities. 7. Existing open area south of Lakeshore Road (former baseball diamond) should be planned to accommodate future fully serviced camping sites and consideration should be given to providing accessible camp sites. A total of 44 campsites are assumed. 8. The existing comfort station / washroom in the main camping area is in need of upgrading and should at least ensure com- pliance with AODA standards. BRANDING AND IMAGE Recommended Development Plan PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAMMING: BEACH ACCESS, CAMPING, PASSIVE RECREATION
  31. 31. 9. Add two new comfort stations – one near the group camp- ers and one near the accessible camp sites. The new comfort stations should be AODA compliant. 10. The garbage enclosure at the park entrance on the north side of the park should be located to a less prominent loca- tion and away from the current trail head. Consideration should be given to alternative collection systems such as a deep well garbage collection system, which can be more visually attractive than standard garbage enclosures. 11. The existing access points to the beach from the existing ser- viced camping areas and pavilion areas need to be improved and properly signed. The concrete steps to the beach (near the pavilions) are showing signs of deterioration and need to be replaced / upgraded. 12. The existing boat launch and associated concrete pad along the beach should be removed. The depth of the water at the boat launch and anticipated sand deposition in this area of the beach do not make this location well suited for a recre- ational boat launch. Considerable investment and likely Fed- eral/ Provincial approvals would be required to continuously dredge and build appropriate infrastructure (e.g. break walls) to prevent sediment build up and ensure adequate water depth for boats. Removing the concrete from the beach would also improve and expand the beach area. 13. The existing waste collection area east of the main gate should be properly screened with upgraded fencing and /or vegetation to screen it from public view. 14. Consider enhancing the buffer / screening on the western property limit (south of Lakeshore Road) abutting the exist- ing residential area to create an improved visual screen for campers as well as help with compatibility between uses. 15. Additional screening / tree planting should be implement- ed along the northern and southern sides of Lakeshore Road to screen the future campgrounds from the public right-of-way. 16. Consideration should be given to removing some existing trees in selected areas along the beach front to improve visibility and access to the beach (particularly from the pavilions and seating areas). NATURAL IMPROVEMENTS
  32. 32. 17. The existing play structure is in need of replacement to conform to current standards, including proper footing and additional benches / seating areas and bicycle racks. 18. The existing basketball net and volleyball court should be updated. The volleyball court should be relocated closer to the beach front in order to build on the beach experi- ence and maximize visibility to the beach. 19. Improve, maintain and widen (minimum 2 metres in width) the existing trail network throughout the northern wood- lot. A wider and improved trail surface would accommo- date multi-purpose uses including hiking, walking and possibly winter activities (weather permitting) such as cross country skiing and snowshoeing. The existing trail network should be expanded to maxi- mize the use of the woodlot. Multi-length loops should be considered to provide a variety of experiences and cater to different skill levels. The trail should avoid the existing storage area and existing waste management facility. RECREATION
  33. 33. 1:2500 LONG BEACH WAINFLEET, ONTARIO - DRAFT MASTER PLAN P L A N N I N G URBAN DESIGN & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MHBC VIEWEXISTING PAVILION SHORELINE ENHANCED ENTRY FEATURE SIGNAGE SITE BOUNDARY PROPOSED TRAIL EXISTING TRAIL MAIN ROAD WASTE LOCATION BEACH ACCESS LOCATION PARKINGVEGETATION 151 4 3 2 17 11 12 13 14 10 7 9 18 8 5 6 16 Long Beach Master Plan (Note: Numerical references on plan correspond with the recommendations summarized on the previous pages.) 9 11 11 19
  34. 34. 1. Enhance Entrance Feature and Signage 2. Update Way-Finding/Educational Signage 3. Update Camp Site Posts 4. New Trailhead Mapping and Signage 5. Gate House Upgrades 6. New Group Camping Area 7. New Accessible Camp Sites 8. Upgrade Comfort Station 9. Add 2 New Comfort Stations 10. Relocate Waste Area 11. Improve Beach Access 12. Remove Boat Launch 13. Screen Waste Area 14. Enhanced Buffer Along Western Edge 15. Additional Tree Plantings to Screen Future Campgrounds 16. Improve Visibility of and Access to Lake 17. Replace Play Structure 18. Update Basketball & Volleyball Courts 19. Improve and Expand Trail Network SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LONG BEACH MASTER PLAN
  35. 35. SHORTTERM Install new entrance features for north & south sides $30,000 Install pedestrian wayfinding signage $30,000 Install new campsite signs & posts $45,000 Install new waste management system $60,000 Install bike racks $8,000 Add new stairs to improve beach access $200,000 Update existing comfort station north of Lakeshore Road $150,000 Remove existing boat launch $5,000 Clear trees to improve views of Lake Erie $5,000 Screen the maintenance area with fencing and plantings $20,000 Add plantings to enhance buffer to westerly uses $10,000 Add plantings along Lakeshore Road1 $50,000 Install new basketball and beach volleyball courts $60,000 Install new play structure $125,000 Add new seating areas $15,000 SUBTOTAL: $813,000 Long Beach Implementation Plan The cost estimates presented here should be considered to be order-of- magnitude only in nature and based on 2017 costs. They are indicative but not precise estimates. Implementation is proposed to be carried out by establishing short term (2-5 years), medium term (5-10 years) and long term (10+ years) goals. For the purposes of this Master Plan, a 15% contingency has also been used to account for inflation and unforeseen costs. Where required, assumptions are noted at the bottom of this page. Note, no allowances have been made for additional studies, professional fees or permits/approvals that may be required to implement some of the recommendations. Furthermore, no allowance has been made for any servicing upgrades that may be required such as electrical, water, security, fire, etc. 1 Assumes screen plating along 200m of Lakeshore Road 2 Assumes a parking lot sized for 20 vehicles 3 Assumes comfort station to be 20 ft x 50 ft 4 Assumes 8 group camp sites (45 ft x 90 ft) 5 Assumes 44 accessible/older adult campsites (15 ft x 30 ft)
  36. 36. MEDIUMTERM Install new ‘green’ parking area by the gate house2 $130,000 Update existing comfort station south of Lakeshore Road. $15,000 Construct new comfort station for group camping3 $250,000 Add new group camping sites4 $200,000 Upgrade gate house $100,000 Clear and enhance the trail network $187,500 SUBTOTAL: $882,500 LONG TERM Construct new accessible or older adult camping area5 $1,100,000 Construct new comfort station for new camping area3 $350,000 SUBTOTAL: $1,450,000 15% CONTINGENCY: $471,825.00 GRAND TOTAL: $3,617,325.00
  37. 37. 7 “LAKEWOOD” PROPERTY The“Lakewood”property was purchased in 2014 by the NPCA from the Easter Seals Society to increase the amount of public beach access in the Township. The property is 15 acres in size and contains approximately 158 metres (519 feet) of beach front access. The “Lakewood”property is located south of Lakeshore Road. The site is currently vacant and contains no buildings or structures. There is no access currently to the site but there is frontage on Lake- shore Road.
  38. 38. Existing Conditions Lakewood Lakewood is a vacant piece of land that was acquired by the NPCA in 2014. The primary attraction of the property is the 158 metres of beach access on the Lake Erie shoreline. A sensitive dune system exists on the property. The subject lands are also known to be important migratory bird and Fowler’s toad habitat. A 41-unit residential subdivision is proposed immediately west of the Lakewood property. The application is still under review. Existing agricultural operations are located east of the subject lands. Existing homes along the waterfront are also located immediately east of the property.
  39. 39. LAKESHORE ROAD LAKE ERIE 1. Beach 2. Dune System 3. Vacant Land 4. Future Residential Development 5. Existing Agricultural Operation 6. Existing Dwellings SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS 1 2 3 4 2 5 6
  40. 40. 1. Create an entrance feature on Lakeshore Road that is identifiable and consistent with other Conservation Areas. 2. Consistent and visible way-finding signage should be provided throughout the site to direct visitors to various amenities on site as well educate visitors regarding appropriate etiquette for site use and respect for natural features. Opportunities for educational / interpretative signage should also be considered particularly along the sensitive dune features along the beach. 3. Construct a kiosk at the entrance that could include maintenance staff and a concession area. New staff parking / maintenance parking could be incorporated at the entrance. Landscaping and screening of the parking should be incorporated into the design. A temporary staff kiosk may be appropriate in the short-term in order to allow for the site to open to the public. 4. A fully accessible washroom facility with the option to provide for outdoor showers should be provided near the beach. Temporary washroom facilities may be appropriate in the short-term in order to open the site to the public. 5. A new boardwalk system with a minimum of two access points to the beach should be constructed. The boardwalk system would ensure that pedestrian traffic is directed through and away from the sensitive sand dune features/habitat. 6. Lookout pavilions and seating areas can be incorporated into the boardwalk system. 7. A new parking area should be constructed within walking distance to the beach area and well setback from the natural feature areas and dunes along the beach front. Consideration should be given to constructing a‘green’parking lot to provide a more of a permeable surface. BRANDING AND IMAGE Recommended Development Plan PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAMMING: BEACH ACCESS, NATURALIZATION, NATURE INTERPRETATION & EDUCATION
  41. 41. 8. A fully accessible and continuous walking trail can be provided along the perimeter of the site to connect all site amenities together as well as provide a pedestrian link from the entrance of the site to the beach. The trail could also provide for other passive activities such as bird watching / nature interpretation. 9. Enhanced tree screening along the property boundaries should be planted to screen the property from adjacent land uses. 10. A fully accessible play structure should be incorporated close to the beach and parking area and outside the natural vegetated areas and dunes along the beach front. 11. Two to three outdoor picnic pavilions complete with bbq stands, picnic tables and benches should be incorporated and clustered together around a central amenity area. 12. Construction of an inland pond should be considered to provide for passive recreation and / or swimming or fishing. The pond can be designed with a fully accessible and AODA compliant dock/deck. 13. A large open area should be incorporated to allow for unobstructed programming space recreational activities (e.g. frisbee golf). NATURAL IMPROVEMENTS RECREATION
  42. 42. Lakewood Master Plan P L A N N I N G URBAN DESIGN & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MHBC LAKEWOOD WAINFLEET, ONTARIO - DRAFT MASTER PLAN VIEWPAVILION/ LOOKOUT SHORELINE ENTRY FEATURE SITE BOUNDARY PROPOSED TRAIL MAIN ROAD SEATING AREAS PROPOSED ROAD VEGETATION BOARDWALK 1 3 2 8 5 6 10 114 12 7. 5. 9 13 9
  43. 43. SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LONG BEACH MASTER PLAN 1. New Entrance Feature 2. Consistent Way-Finding/Educational Signage 3. New Kiosk/ Office 4. Accessible Washroom 5. New Boardwalk 6. Lookout Pavilion & Seating Areas 7. Parking Area (Approx. 50 Cars) 8. Accessible Walking Trail 9. Tree Screening 10. Accessible Play Structure 11. 2-3 Outdoor Picnic Pavilions 12. Pond for Passive Recreation 13. Open area for unobstructed programming or recreational activities (e.g frisbee golf) 15. 16.
  44. 44. Lakewood – Implementation Plan SHORTTERM Install new entrance feature $15,000 Install new etiquette and interpretative signage $20,000 Install pedestrian wayfinding signage $2,500 Add temporary structure for staff kiosk and washroom facilities $100,000 Construct lookouts and gazebos $30,000 Construct boardwalk to provide beach access over dunes $60,000 Construct ‘green’ parking area $325,000 Clear and build trail network (including signage) $72,000 New picnic tables (with BBQ stands) $20,000 SUBTOTAL: $644,500 Lakewood Implementation Plan The cost estimates presented here should be considered to be order-of- magnitude only in nature. They are indicative but not precise estimates. Implementation is proposed to be carried out by establishing short term (2-5 years), medium term (5-10 years) and long term (10+ years) goals. For the purposes of this Master Plan, a 15% contingency has been used to account for inflation and unforeseen costs. Where required, assumptions are noted at the bottom of this page. Note, no allowances have been made for additional studies, professional fees, or permits/approvals that may be required to implement some of the recommendations. Furthermore, no allowance has been made for any servicing upgrades that may be required such as electrical, water, security, fire, etc. 1 Assumes a parking lot sized for 50 vehicles 2 Assumes a 300 square foot building and includes servicing costs
  45. 45. MEDIUMTERM Construct information kiosk with concession facility $300,000 Construct washrooms with potable water and outdoor showers $300,000 Install new waste management system (Moloks) $30,000 Install new play structure $150,000 Add picnic pavilions (3) $300,000 SUBTOTAL: $1,080,000 LONG TERM Install natural pool/pond $350,000 SUBTOTAL: $350,000 15% CONTINGENCY: $311,175.00 GRAND TOTAL: $2,385,675.00
  46. 46. 8 MORGAN’S POINT Morgan’s Point Conservation Area is 9.6 acres in size and is located on the west side of Morgan’s Point Road. The lands are adjacent to and established residential neighbourhood to the north and east. Morgan’s Point is bordered to the west and south by Lake Erie. Morgan’s Point was a former municipally-owned campground, which was eventually transferred to the NPCA in 2001. The prop- erty is home to one of the few remaining sand dune ecosystems and oak savannah areas along the Lake Erie shoreline. The property is an important stopover area for migratory birds and butterflies.
  47. 47. Existing Conditions Morgan’s Point Morgan’s Point acts as a community park for the local residences in the area. Although popular to local residents, the park is difficult to find as wayfinding signage is not available and the park entrance is difficult to see from the road. A parking lot exists but is limited, largely undefined, and made of gravel. The park contains a playground which is in relatively good condition, and a washroom facility is located separate from the playground and parking lot area. Walking paths and pedestrian benches give users an opportunity to enjoy and experience the Lake Erie shoreline. A relatively new boardwalk,includinginterpretativesignageandlookoutsalso exists, but the boardwalk is not continuous and the signage is in need of an update. The‘beach’contains a number of fossils and limited swimming opportunities due to the shale rock along the shoreline. The shoreline at the park does provide excellent views and vistas of the Lake.
  48. 48. 1:1000 MORGAN‛SPOINTROAD LAKEERIE 1. Entry feature signage 2. Parking lot 3. Playground 4. Washroom 5. Walking paths 6. Lake access/lookout 7. Boardwalk 8. Shale beach SUMMARY OF EXISTING CONDITIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 6 6 5
  49. 49. 1. The entrance area and signage on Morgan’s Point Road should be improved to ensure the park entrance is clearly delineated and visible from the traveling public. The pillars at the entrance should be retained, restored (and possibly relocated within the park) to acknowledge and retain their historical significance. 2. Consistent and visible way-finding signs should be installed throughout the park to demarcate uses and trailways. Interpretative / educational/ etiquette signage can be incorporated throughout the park and at various locations along the trail. 3. The existing parking area should be improved and delineated with appropriate marker posts and / or additional landscape features to prohibit vehicular access on other parts of the property. Parking improvements could be phased whereby the initial improvements would define the parking area with gravel and long term improvements would include constructing a‘green’parking lot. 4. The existing washroom facility needs to be updated and consideration should be given to relocating the washroom closer to the parking area. The existing facility is setback from the parking area and other active uses creating a potential safety concern along with maintenance and accessibility challenges. BRANDING AND IMAGE Recommended Development Plan PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAMMING: PASSIVE RECREATION, NATURE INTERPRETATION & EDUCATION
  50. 50. 5. The views and vistas from the park out to Lake Erie should be maximized and enhanced with various lookout landings and / or structures. 6. The existing roadway / walking path around the open space area should be reconfigured / redesigned to provide a continuous loop around the proposed picnic shelters. 7. Natural habitats should be sustained and enhanced for long term ecological benefit. A pollinator garden could be considered on the site for the migratory butterflies. 8. Two or three gazebos or picnic shelters should be installed within the open space of the park to provide for rental opportunities. Picnic areas can be supplemented with outdoor bbqs and picnic tables / seating. Picnic / shelter areas and open space areas can be used to host special community events. 9. Outdoor educational opportunities should be considered for the property. A small outdoor amphitheater should be considered as an amenity and educational feature that can either be used or rented by community groups, schools, weddings or compliment Conservation Authority programming. The amphitheater should consist of seating to accommodate a minimum of 50 people and provide for a covered central podium / stage. The amphitheater location should take advantage of existing grades/topography and use naturalized seating (e.g. stone, logs) to‘blend-in’with the natural environment. 10. In order to provide winter activity opportunities, an outdoor ice rink and ice skating circuit can be incorporated around the existing play area and entrance of the site. A location close to Morgan’s Point Road and the abutting residential uses would ensure“eyes on the park”. Partnership opportunities with the neighbourhood association could be explored to assist with the maintenance and management of the ice rink / circuit. 11. A fully accessible walking trail along the waterfront should be planned and designed consisting of an accessible boardwalk. The boardwalk would extend the entire length of the lake shore at a lower elevation than the existing boardwalk in the park (which is located on top of the existing dune feature). NATURAL IMPROVEMENTS RECREATION
  51. 51. 1:1000 Morgan’s Point Master Plan 5 2 2 11 P L A N N I N G URBAN DESIGN & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MHBC MORGAN’S POINT WAINFLEET, ONTARIO - DRAFT MASTER PLAN VIEW EXISTING / RELOCATED WASHROOM FACILITY EXISTING TRAIL SHORELINE FOSSIL / NATURE INTERPRETATION SIGNAGE SITE BOUNDARY PROPOSED TRAIL MAIN ROAD FULL ACCESS BOARDWALK ENHANCED ENTRY FEATURE EXISTING BOARDWALK VEGETATION GAZEBO / SHELTER 4 10 49 67 5 5 1 4 8 3 2 2
  52. 52. 1. Enhanced Entrance Feature and Signage 2. Consistent Way-Finding/Educational/Etiquette Signage 3. Improved Parking Area 4. New Relocated Washroom 5. Improve Visibility / lookouts of lake 6. Reconfigure Walking Path 7. Sustain and enhance natural habitats 8. 2-3 Gazebos or Picnic Shelters 9. New Outdoor Amphitheater 10. New Outdoor Ice Rink / Skating Circuit 11. Accessible Walking Trail SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR MORGAN’S POINT MASTER PLAN
  53. 53. Morgan’s Point Implementation Plan SHORTTERM Install new entrance feature $15,000 Install new etiquette and interpretative signage $10,000 Install pedestrian wayfinding signage $5,000 Install trail head signage $5,000 Parking area improvements (define parking area with gravel) $30,000 Clear and enhance existing trail (including signage) $39,000 Clear new trail (including signage) $19,500 Open space creation and tree removal $30,000 Install new lookouts, gazebos and shelters $200,000 Add new picnic pavilions with BBQ stands $200,000 SUBTOTAL: $553,500MEDIUMTERM Construct ‘green’ parking area1 $130,000 Construct new washroom2 $250,000 Demolish old washroom $5,000 Install full access boardwalk $500,000 Install servicing and water hydrant for ice rink (including grading) $20,000 SUBTOTAL: $823,750 LONG TERM Install new amphitheatre and stage $250,000 SUBTOTAL: $250,000 15% CONTINGENCY: $256,275.00 GRAND TOTAL: $1,964,775.00 The cost estimates presented here should be considered to be order-of-magnitude only in nature and based on 2017 costs. They are indicative but not precise estimates. Implementation is proposed to be carried out by establishing short term (2-5 years), medium term (5-10 years) and long term (10+ years) goals. For the purposes of this Master Plan, a 15% contingency has been used to account for inflation and unforeseen costs. Where required, assumptions are noted at the bottom of this page. Note, no allowances have been made for additional studies, professional fees, or permits/approvals that may be required to implement some of the recommendations. Furthermore,noallowancehasbeenmadefor any servicing upgrades that may be required such as electrical, water, security, fire, etc. 1 Assumes parking area for 30 vehicles. 2 Assumes new washroom is 450 square feet based on the existing building and no new services are required
  54. 54. 9 WAINFLEET WETLANDS AND QUARRY The Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry property was purchased by the NPCAin1978.Thepurposeinacquiringthepropertywastopreserve the fish and wildlife habitat. The property operated as a clay and limestone quarry from the late 19th century until the 1960s, which have since naturalized. The property is located between the Gord Harry Trail and Lakeshore Road (north/south) and between Cement Road and Rathfon Road (east/west). The property is also bisected by Quarrie and Bessey Roads. The property is bordered to the east, opposite Cement Road, by the City of Port Colborne. In total, the Wainfleet Wetlands/Quarry property is 185 hectares (458 acres) in size. The site is a Bronze Plaque Award winner for quarry rehabilitation work with the Management of Abandoned Aggregate Properties Program, awarded for efforts to increase wetland development and habitat cover for improved diversity and function in the landscape.
  55. 55. The Wainfleet Wetlands and Quarry property has naturalized since the NPCA purchased the lands in 1978 and provides habitat for a variety of wildlife, aquatic and vegetation species/communities. The wetlands on the eastern portion of the property provides unique habitat and migratory stop-over for a large variety of bird species. An entrance plaque is located off of Quarrie Road (near the Gord Harry Conservation Trail) to recognize the Bronze Plaque Award that was given for the quarry rehabilitation work. There is also a small, undefined gravel parking lot at this location. A number of informal trail accesses have been established off of Quarrie Road and the Gord Harry Conservation Trail. The Gord Harry Conservation Trail borders the entire northern limits of the property. The trail is 13 kilometres in length and stretches across the entire length of the Township. A Master Plan for theWainfleetWetlands and Quarry property was prepared in 1980 and updated in 1993. The original Master Plan proposed that the property be developed for low intensity use for a variety of dispersed activities such as nature and geology study, fishing, hunting, hiking and riding. Camping, swimming, picnic facilities and washrooms were not recommended. Three parking lots, a series of designated trails, wildlife habitat improvements, fencing, and hunting were recommended to be implemented.The purpose of the updated Master Plan was to conduct an inventory of the status of the Conservation Area and make recommendations for fish and wildlife and forest management. The property is currently open to the public and no entry fees are charged and there are no facilities provided. There are no permanent full time staff assigned to the property but staff do operate the pump in the quarry; which maintains the water levels in the rehabilitated lakes. The lands are generally used by the public for passive recreational uses such as hiking, swimming, fishing and fossil collection. Hunting is currently permitted and regulated by the NPCA. The quarry lakes have become a popular‘watering-hole’particularly when water quality in Lake Erie has prohibited swimming in the Lake. Existing Conditions Wainfleet Wetlands and Quarry
  56. 56. GORD HARRY CONSERVATION TRAIL LAKE ERIE LAKE ERIE GORD HARRY CONSERVATION TRAIL QUARRIERD CEMENTRD BESSEYRD LAKESHORE RD W PO LAKESHORE RD W SUMMARY MAP EXISTING CONDITIONS 1. Entrance Feature 2. Parking Area 3. Gord Harry Conservation Trail 4. Former Quarry lake 5. Former Clay Pits 6. Informal Trail Network/Access 7. Bridge 8. Township Parking Area 9. Existing Quarry Pump 1 2 4 7 8 5 2 63 9 4 6 6
  57. 57. 1. The main entrance to the Conservation Area should be directed to the existing parking area on the northern limit of the property off of Quarrie Road. This location provides direct access to not only the broader public transportation network but also the Gord Harry Conservation Trail. 2. Entrance features and signage should be provided at the Quarrie Road access. The entrance feature should have a consistent look and brand as the other Conservation Authority properties. 3. Interpretative / educational signage can be provided throughout the site and along the proposed trail network. 4. Way-finding signage and trail maps should also be provided at strategic locations throughout the property as the trail network/system is developed. 5. The existing parking area off of Quarrie Road should be expanded to provide a minimum of 40 to 50 parking spaces. An interim gravel parking area should be provided until the new multi-use building is constructed. At that time consideration should be given to installing a green parking area. 6. Two new gravel parking areas should be provided near the Gord Harry Conservation Trail at the Bessey Road and Cement Road crossings. The Cement Road crossing marks the beginning of the Gord Harry Trail and a specific trailhead / entrance feature (marking beginning of the trail) should be considered at this location. These parking areas could act as landing / staging areas for future trail connections on the balance of the property. 7. Access to the quarry at the culvert crossing on Quarrie Road should be controlled such that visitors to the park are directed to the new entrance near the Gord Harry Trail. 8. A multi-use building (approximately 5,000 square feet) should be developed to accommodate park uses and provide for partnership opportunities to various community organizations and/or Conservation Authority programming. The building could provide for events that can be rented for community uses; private functions and / or Conservation Authority programs. It can also be used to house rental facilities for the balance of the property. Private partnership opportunities for rental uses and other activities should be explored. The design and siting of the building should reflect and be sensitive to the natural environment and where possible incorporate low impact development standards and sustainable building design criteria such as LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). BRANDING AND IMAGE Recommended Development Plan PHYSICAL IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAMMING: ACTIVE RECREATION, RECREATION HUB, NATURE INTERPRETATION & EDUCATION AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
  58. 58. 9. The existing quarry lake shore line should be improved, particularly near the multi-use building in order to provide better access to the inland lake. A new sand beach should be considered for the northern shoreline of the lake to improve and enhance water access. 10. A new multi-purpose trail network should be designed and planned around the wetland areas between Bessey Road and Cement Road in order to direct the public through the site and away from sensitive areas. Boardwalks may need to be considered and incorporated into the overall trail design. Lookouts and seating areas should be strategically incorporated at various points near the wetland / lake areas to provide nature interpretation opportunities. The proposed trail network should be designed with multiple routes and provide for multiple users such as cross country skiing, snowshoeing, mountain biking (motorized vehicles / ATV’s should be discouraged). Construction of the trail network can be phased over time. 11. Zip lining opportunities over the quarry should be considered and explored, where feasible. The NPCA should consider partnership opportunities with a private enterprise to operate and manage this use. 12. Canoe / kayak rental can be centralized at the multi-use building. Public / private partnership can be explored to offer this service. 13. Opportunities to partner with private operators to offer canoe/kayak or scuba diving lessons, etc. should also be explored. 14. The existing trail around the quarry lake can be improved and expanded. Strategically located boardwalks around the lake would be required to ensure a continuous loop around the two quarry lakes, on either side of Quarrie Road. 15. Opportunities to create a boardwalk underneath Quarrie Road at the existing culvert at the southern limit of the two lakes should be explored to avoid the need to have pedestrians cross Quarrie Road at grade. 16. A pedestrian walkway connection should be provided along Quarrie Road to connect the main entrance to Lakeshore Road and beach accesses along Lake Erie. Signage, pavement markings and / or a physical road-side trail within the right-of-way should be explored with the Township. 17. Tree walk opportunities should be considered and explored, where physically feasible. The NPCA should consider partnership opportunities with a private enterprise to operate and manage this use. NATURAL IMPROVEMENTS RECREATION
  59. 59. WAINFLEET WETLANDS WAINFLEET, ONTARIO - DRAFT MASTER PLAN VIEW SITE BOUNDARY PROPOSED TRAIL GORD HARRY TRAIL MAIN ROAD PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION WITHIN RIGHT-OF-WAY BOARDWALK SAND BEACH EXISTING PARKING PROPOSED PARKING VEGETATION SHORELINE P L A N N I N G URBAN DESIGN & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MHBC 12 2 3 4 5 6 6 8 10 9 16 15 9 1 13 4 17 11 3 3 14 7
  60. 60. 1. Establish Main Entrance to Site 2. New Entrance Feature and Signage 3. New Interpretive/Education Signage 4. New Way-Finding Signage 5. Expand/improve existing parking area (40-50 spaces) 6. Create new parking areas 7. Control Access to Site 8. New Multi-Use Building (~5,000 sq ft) 9. New Sand Beach 10. New Multi-Purpose Trail Network 11. Zip Lining 12. Canoe/Kayak Rental Services 13. Recreational Activities (e.g. Scuba Diving) 14. Improve Trail System around Quarry lakes 15. New Boardwalk Underneath Quarrie Road 16. Pedestrian Walkway Connection Along Quarrie Road 17. Tree Walk SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS FOR WAINFLEET WETLANDS MASTER PLAN
  61. 61. Wainfleet Wetlands Implementation Plan SHORTTERM Install new entrance feature $15,000 Install new etiquette signage $5,000 Install pedestrian wayfinding signage $20,000 Install trail head signage $10,000 Add temporary structure for staff kiosk and washroom facilities $100,000 Interim parking area (gravel) $50,000 Install picnic tables (including BBQ stands) $20,000 Create a new sandy beach in the quarry $50,000 Clear new trail (including signage)1 $247,500 Install lookouts around the quarry $125,000 Install boardwalks (as necessary for trail connections)2 $105,000 SUBTOTAL: $747,500 MEDIUMTERM New gravel parking lots $60,000 Clear new trail (including signage)1 $247,500 Install boardwalks (as necessary for trail connections)2 $105,000 SUBTOTAL: $412,500 LONGTERM Multi-purpose building3 $1,125,000 ‘Green’ parking lot near multi-purpose building $325,000 Tree-top zip line park4 $300,000 SUBTOTAL: $1,525,000 15% CONTINGENCY: $436,500 GRAND TOTAL: $3,346,500 The cost estimates presented here should be considered to be order-of-magnitude only in nature and based on 2017 costs. They are indicative but not precise estimates. Implementation is proposed to be carried out by establishing short term (2-5 years), medium term (5-10 years) and long term (10+ years) goals. For the purposes of this Master Plan, a 15% contingency has been used to account for inflation and unforeseen costs. Where required, assumptions are noted at the bottom of this page. Note, no allowances have been made for additional studies, professional fees, or permits/approvals that may be required to implement some of the recommendations. Furthermore, no allowance has been made for any servicing upgrades that may be required such as electrical, water, security fire, etc. 1 Assumes a total of 6.6 km of trails to be built. Construction is phased over short and medium term. 2 Assumes a total of 700 m of boardwalk to be built. Construction is phased over short and medium term. 3 Assumes a 5,000 square foot building to be constructed at a cost of $250 per square foot 4 Includes a building (600 square feet), parking and servicing. A private business will be responsible to operate the tree-top zip line park.
  62. 62. 10 ECONOMIC IMPACT
  63. 63. ECONOMIC IMPACT SECTION TO BE COMPLETED PENDING APPROVAL BY THE NPCA
  64. 64. 11 CONCLUSIONS Each of the four NPCA owned properties studied in this Master Plan are unique. The proposed Master Plans are a result of stakeholder and public in- put to understand the needs of the community. Given the unique character of each property, the proposed uses and management of each property is based on different themes/ programming objectives. As a result, the level of proposed activity and use varies by property. Together, the four properties offer great opportunity to benefit the immediate community, the Region and the NPCA. It is recommended that this Master Plan be continuously monitored to ensure implementation of the various recommendations through the NPCA capital budget. It is also recommended that this Master Plan be reviewed every five years to update the recommendations, as necessary.

×