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Top 4 Fatherhood Memoirs

Take a look into the lives of a few others, and their experiences with their own fathers, as you read their memoirs. Even if you’ve led different lives, you just might find there are some universal truths that transcend all boundaries.

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Top 4 Fatherhood Memoirs

  1. 1. The Top 4 Fatherhood Memoirs MICHAEL RALBY MICHAELRALBY.ORG
  2. 2. The holidays are approaching, and with them, likely a wave of nostalgia. Take a look into the lives of a few others, and their experiences with their own fathers, as you read their memoirs. Even if you’ve led different lives, you just might find there are some universal truths that transcend all boundaries.
  3. 3. Daditude: The Joys and Absurdities of Modern Fatherhood, by Chris Erskine Daditude is a collection of stories written by Los Angeles Times editor and writer Chris Erskine’s newspaper articles. Throughout his columns, Erskine details his experiences as a white, upper-middle-class father living in modern Southern California. His stories are sharp and concise, though they retain a folksy kind of charm as he regales tales of the family dog, his children growing up, and home maintenance, among others. CLIMATE CHANGE - 3
  4. 4. Kickflip Boys: A Memoir of Freedom, Rebellion, and the Chaos of Fatherhood, by Neal Thompson Neal Thompson’s book, Kickflip Boys, weaves in and out of his two sons’childhood and adolescence. Included among his stories feature familiar themes that many parents have not only witnessed in their own children but have lived through themselves. Though Thompson self-admittedly does not take all of their actions well—their drinking, experimenting with drugs, and staying out too late come to mind—he is refreshingly honest about what being a parent honestly feels like. Just like his boys, Thompson is trying to find his way, even when doing so is anything but easy.
  5. 5. Someone Could Get Hurt: A Memoir of Twenty-First-Century Parenthood by Drew Magary Drew Magary’s Someone Could Get Hurt remains frank but humorous throughout its entirety, much like Thompson’s Kickflip Boys. Magary balances the book with a combination of both funny and severe stories—he opens with a retelling of his youngest son’s time in the NICU, but then he also recounts stories like the time his son used a hotel pool as his personal bathroom. It’s clear, though, that behind each story is a sense of love and compassion, and never mean-spirited.
  6. 6. Fatherhood Is Leadership, by Devon Bandison Part-memoir, part-how-to-guide, Devon Bandison discusses fatherhood and how tightly it entwines with the concept of leadership. He reflects on his own experiences with his children and how his world has changed since becoming a father but provides stories that anyone can relate to and lessons everyone can learn. Anyone who wants to improve their leadership abilities will benefit from reading this book and Bandison’s first-hand accounts of learning to become a more engaged and connected father.
  7. 7. Thanks for viewing! Find Michael at his website MichaelRalby.org

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