Does Format Matter? Comparing the Usage of E-Books and P-Books

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Levine-Clark, Michael, and Christopher C. Brown, “Does Format Matter? Comparing the Usage of E-Books and P-Books,” Charleston Conference, Charleston, S.C., November 9, 2012.

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Does Format Matter? Comparing the Usage of E-Books and P-Books

  1. 1. Does Format Matter? Comparingthe Usage of E-Books and P-Books Charleston Conference November 9, 2012 Michael Levine-Clark Christopher C. Brown
  2. 2. Methodology
  3. 3. Duke University Press• Added October 2008• Loaded MARC records December 2008• Purchase all e/p• 1,378 e-books – Frontlist approximately 120 per year – Backlist• 2,175 p-books• 841 in both formats
  4. 4. The Data• Gathered circ data – Through December 2008 – Each subsequent December (2009-2011) – Cumulative• Compiled e-book use data – At end of each year, 2009-2011 – For each year
  5. 5. Apples and Oranges• pBook checkouts – Undergrad: 3 weeks – Grad: 10 weeks – Faculty: 1 year – Potentially many uses per checkout, and some when deciding to checkout• eBook use – One time in the book is one use
  6. 6. About Discovery and Data• Discovery through catalog records• Data merger issues: – Title variations – ISBN complexities – Multi-volume issues
  7. 7. E and P Typically Pattern Together in Results Classic Catalog Encore (next-gen) Catalog
  8. 8. Data Difficulties: Title Variations Catalog Record Vendor RecordSeries used with title The Sri Lanka reader : World Readers : Sri history, culture, Lanka Reader : History, politics / John Clifford Culture, Politics Holt, ed.Series used with title Julia Childs The French Spin Offs : Julia Childs chef / Dana Polan. The French ChefWord renderings Present tense : rock & Present Tense : Rock roll and culture and Roll and CultureSpaces Percussion : drumming, Percussion: Drumming, beating, striking Beating, StrikingVendors and catalogers don’t necessarily agree on title formation.This makes matching on title impossible.
  9. 9. More Title Variations Catalog Record Vendor RecordGremlin characters Affective communities : Affective communities:(diacritics) anticolonial thought, fin-de-anticolonial thought, Fin-De- si├ ¿cle radicalism, and the SiFcle radicalism, and the politics of friendship politics of friendshipPresence/Absence of The life and traditions of the Life and Traditions of the RedSubtitles Red man Man : A rediscovered treasure of Native American LiteratureTitle Discrepencies A coincidence of desires : Coincidence of Desire : anthropology, queer studies, Anthropology, Queer Indonesia Studies, IndonesiaTranslated Titles Desencuentros de la Divergent Modernities : modernidad en América Culture and Politics in Latina. English, Divergent Nineteenth-Century Latin modernities : culture and America politics in nineteenth- century Latin America
  10. 10. Data Difficulties: Multiple ISBNs
  11. 11. Data Difficulties: ISBN 10? ISBN 13?
  12. 12. Data Difficulties: ISBN Irregularities Note the ISBN10 with ISBN 13, the parentheses, and the multiple ISBN numbers
  13. 13. Data Solution: Create an ISBN 9ISBN 9 eliminates the ISBN 13 – 978 prefixand the final check-digit, creating a useablematch-point, in cases where the electronicand print versions agree on base ISBN.
  14. 14. Data Difficulties: Too Many Sources• Usage reports include only titles that are actually used – Needed to pull in unused titles from elsewhere • Different formats
  15. 15. Data Methodology using Microsoft Access• Get annual use stats of e-books from vendor• Get master list of e-titles from vendor.• Derive ISBN9 for each list for proper overlay• Overlay annual use stats onto master list of e-books• Get circ stats for print books from ILS• Derive master list of all print titles from ILS• Derive ISBN 9 for each p title.• Overlay annual circ stats onto master list of p-books• Merge circ and use data together
  16. 16. Data Conclusions• Microsoft Access for overlays; Microsoft Excel for analysis• Overlay on title is nearly impossible• Better standards are needed – a single ISBN, please!• Deriving an “ISBN9” was the only way to get anywhere, but even this was far from perfect
  17. 17. Usage
  18. 18. eBooks• COUNTER – 502 titles used (36.7%) – 27,640 uses • 55.1 per title used • 20.2 per title – 866 titles not used• User Sessions – 503 titles used – 2,585 sessions • 5.1 per title used – 874 titles not used
  19. 19. eBooks• Pages Viewed – Average: 49.4 – Highest: 1,933 – Median: 11• Pages Printed – 56 titles – Average: 34.4 pages – Highest: 289 – Median: 18
  20. 20. pBooks• 1,435 titles used (66.0%)• 4,196 checkouts (2,727 before Dec 2008) – 2.9 per title used – 1.9 per title• 740 titles not used
  21. 21. Most Used eBooks (COUNTER)• Poor People’s Politics: Peronist Survival Networks and the Legacy of Evita (2001) – 2,174 uses (all in 2011) – 4 checkouts (1 before Dec 2008, 1 in 2010, 2 in 2011) – 101 user sessions (#5) – 190 pages printed (37%)• Museum Frictions: Public Cultures/Global Transformations (2006) – 1,003 uses (824 in 2010) – 4 checkouts (2 before Dec 2008, 1 in 2010, 1 in 2011) – 15 User Sessions (#24) – 0 pages printed
  22. 22. Most Used eBooks, User Sessions• Date Which Will Live (2003) – 185 User Sessions (all in 2011) – #20 on COUNTER list (305 uses) – 2 checkouts – 50 pages printed (16%)• Politics of Memory in Postwar Europe (2006) – 158 User Sessions (155 in 2011) – #25 on COUNTER list (256 uses) – 8 checkouts – 74 pages printed (18%)
  23. 23. Most Used pBooks• Argumentative Turn in Policy Analysis and Planning (1993) – 37 checkouts (36 before Dec 2008) – 9 uses of the e-version – 2 user sessions, 0 pages printed• Culture, Power, Place: Explorations in Critical Anthropology (1997) – 24 checkouts (21 before Dec 2008) – 14 uses of the e-version (11 in Dec 2008) – 5 user sessions, 0 pages printed
  24. 24. Dual Format Use• 325 titles used in both formats – 20,619 e-book uses • 63.5 per title used – 1,874 user sessions • 5.8 per title used – 1,229 p-book checkouts (743 before Dec 2008) • 3.8 per title used – 40 titles with pages printed (out of 56) • 36.9 pages per title used – 56.3 pages viewed on average
  25. 25. P Used, E Not• 364 titles – 952 checkouts • 2.4 per title used
  26. 26. E Used, P Not• 177 titles• 7,021 uses – 39.7 per title• 711 user sessions• 6,556 pages viewed – 36.8 per title• 16 titles with pages printed – 28.1 per title
  27. 27. E-Book Usage
  28. 28. E-Book Usage
  29. 29. P-Book Usage
  30. 30. How Closely Are P/E Usage Linked?
  31. 31. Increased Checkouts, 2008-2011• For titles available at the start of the project (Dec 2008), how many more checkouts were there by Dec 2011?• Was that increase linked in any way to e- usage?• Was it linked in any way to type of e-usage?
  32. 32. Increased Checkouts 2008-2011• 1,057 titles with increased checkouts• 707 had no e-availability• 192 also had e-use – 75.6 uses per title – 7.2 user sessions per title – 65.4 pages viewed per title• 158 had no e-use
  33. 33. Observations• Use of E doesn’t seem to lead to use of P• Use of P doesn’t seem to lead to use of E• If both formats are used, – they are both used at a higher rate than average – They have greater meaningful use as e-books • Pages viewed • User sessions• These patterns even more significant for e/p usage when p usage increased over time
  34. 34. Thoughts• If dual format usage is higher by all measures, does this mean that people’s preference is for good content, not format?
  35. 35. Further Questions• Might there be differences – By subject? – By date?• How does discovery play in?
  36. 36. Thank You

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