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SOCI 11 - Day Two - Tuesday Morning - June 14, 2016

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Slide decks presented during Day Two sessions of the 11th Annual Stewards of Change National Symposium at Johns Hopkins University.

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SOCI 11 - Day Two - Tuesday Morning - June 14, 2016

  1. 1. Stewards of Change Institute 11th Annual National Symposium June 14, 2016 Tuesday Opening Session
  2. 2. Opening Session, Tuesday June 14th • Overview of the InterOptimability Training and Certification Program (ITCC) • Daniel Stein • Curriculum Discussion • Dr. Harold Lehmann • Overnight Reflections & Discussion
  3. 3. ITCC Target & Goals Target Audience: • Executives, Program Managers, Supervisors, Case Workers Key Goals: • Manage Organizational Change • Expedite Responsible Information Sharing • Bridge Program Silos • Develop 21st Century Tools, Knowledge & Competencies
  4. 4. ITCC Approach: • An agile, customizable methodology for individuals and organizations ready to pursue InterOptimability. • Utilizes 10+ years of SOC experience drawn from symposia, research, consulting, subject matter experts. • Leverages “best in class” academic and practitioner collaborations for curriculum modules. • Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health • American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) will offer accredited badges & certificates. • Certified InterOptimability Professional (CIP)
  5. 5. SOCI InterOptimability Training and Certification Curriculum Video • Click here to view the video on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sB7zvZRY Wdg
  6. 6. lehmann@jhmi.edu Education & Training Harold Lehmann MD PhD Profesor and Director lehmann@jhmi.edu
  7. 7. lehmann@jhmi.edu ONC National ~Curriculum • HITECH act included funding 2010−2013 for Training-material development Course teaching through community colleges and subsidies University-based degree subsidies Certificate exam
  8. 8. lehmann@jhmi.edu ONC National ~Curriculum • HITECH act included funding 2010−2013 for Training-material development being renewed 2015−2017 Course teaching through community colleges and subsidies University-based degree subsidies Certificate exam
  9. 9. lehmann@jhmi.edu New Components • About 15 hours of online material for each of the following Population Health Value-Based Care New Payment Models Data Analytics Patient-Centered Care
  10. 10. lehmann@jhmi.edu New Components • About 15 hours of online material for each of the following Population Health Value-Based Care New Payment Models Data Analytics Patient-Centered Care
  11. 11. lehmann@jhmi.edu Population Health Hadi Kharrazi, MD PhD, Assoc Director Center for Population Health IT (CPHIT) Jonathan Weiner, DrPH, Dir CPHIT. Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHBSPH) David Chin, MD MBA, Distinguished Scholar at JHBSPH Eric Ford, PhD, Professor and Assoc Chair, Health Policy Management JHBSPH Linda Dunbar, PhD, VP Population Health & Care Management JH HealthCare
  12. 12. lehmann@jhmi.edu Units • Population Health and the Application of Health IT • Structural “Accountable” Care Approaches for Target Population • Implications of Policy, Finance, and Business on Population Health • Research Evaluation and Evidence Generation in Population Health • Population Health IT and Data Systems • Big Data, Interoperability and Analytics for Population Health • Applying Health IT to Improve Population Health at the Community Level • Identifying Risk and Segmenting Populations: Predictive Analytics for Population Health • Population Health Management Interventions • Engaging Consumer, Providers and Community in Population Health Programs
  13. 13. lehmann@jhmi.edu What Will Be Available A La Carte (Units) • Powerpoint • Transcript • ppt + voiceover • Activities • Self Assessment • Component blueprint • 508 Compliant Meals (Modules) • Policy track • Data track • Intervention track
  14. 14. lehmann@jhmi.edu Units • Population Health and the Application of Health IT • Structural “Accountable” Care Approaches for Target Population • Implications of Policy, Finance, and Business on Population Health • Research Evaluation and Evidence Generation in Population Health • Population Health IT and Data Systems • Big Data, Interoperability and Analytics for Population Health • Applying Health IT to Improve Population Health at the Community Level • Identifying Risk and Segmenting Populations: Predictive Analytics for Population Health • Population Health Management Interventions • Engaging Consumer, Providers and Community in Population Health Programs Policy Data InterventionsIntro
  15. 15. lehmann@jhmi.edu JH Need: Train 1,000 • We’ll be happy to provide you with “meals” that plug into a learning module system • Did I say it was free? • Current partners VHA State of Maryland Johns Hopkins HealthCare Virtua Health Systems Drexel
  16. 16. lehmann@jhmi.edu Updates of Old • Introduction to Health Care and Public Health in the U.S. • The Culture of Health Care • Terminology in Health Care and Public Health Settings • Introduction to Information and Computer Science • History of Health Information Technology in the U.S. • Health Management Information Systems • Working with Health IT Systems • Installation and Maintenance of Health IT Systems • Networking and Health Information Exchange • Fundamentals of Health Workflow Process Analysis & Redesign • Configuring EHRs • Quality Improvement • Public Health IT • Special Topics Course on Vendor-Specific Systems • Usability and Human Factors • Professionalism/Customer Service in the Health Environment • Working in Teams • Planning, Management and Leadership for Health IT • Introduction to Project Management • Training and Instructional Design
  17. 17. lehmann@jhmi.edu Updates of Old • Introduction to Health Care and Public Health in the U.S. • The Culture of Health Care • Terminology in Health Care and Public Health Settings • Introduction to Information and Computer Science • History of Health Information Technology in the U.S. • Health Management Information Systems • Working with Health IT Systems • Installation and Maintenance of Health IT Systems • Networking and Health Information Exchange • Fundamentals of Health Workflow Process Analysis & Redesign • Configuring EHRs • Quality Improvement • Public Health IT • Special Topics Course on Vendor-Specific Systems • Usability and Human Factors • Professionalism/Customer Service in the Health Environment • Working in Teams • Planning, Management and Leadership for Health IT • Introduction to Project Management • Training and Instructional Design
  18. 18. lehmann@jhmi.edu Relationship to ITT • Content aligns • Modules can refer to each other • A la carte material can be fashioned e.g., customized for using opioid issue as a running case
  19. 19. lehmann@jhmi.edu Other Resources • ONC interoperability training online • OpenCourseware: Health Information Technology Standards and Systems Interoperability • lehmann@jhmi.edu
  20. 20. The Shape of Things to Come (and How We Can Shape Them!) Moderator: Shell Culp, Chief Innovation Officer, Stewards of Change Institute Presenters: o Joshua C. Rubin, JD, MBA, MPP, MPH, Program Officer, Learning Health System Initiatives, U. of Michigan Medical School – Learning Health Systems o Michelle Garber, Vice President of Lifeline, Universal Service Administrative Company – Lifeline Communications o Steve Ambrosini, Executive Director, IJIS Institute, SCC Oversight Coordinator – National Standards Coordinating Council o Maribel Marin, Executive Director, 211 LA and President, 211 California – 211 o Michael Wilkening, Undersecretary, California Health and Human Services Agency – State Government Innovations
  21. 21. Hunt for Collaboration: Realizing a Learning Health System Together to Democratize Health Tuesday, June 14, 2016 Joshua C. Rubin, JD, MBA, MPH, MPP Josh@JoshCRubin.com @JoshCRubin
  22. 22. http://www.healthcareitnews.com/blog/memoraim-hunt-blair
  23. 23. A Learning Health System (LHS)… A System of Health Learners… •Every Human Health Experience… •Every Decision Affecting Health… •Every Person…
  24. 24. 26 Patient Groups Governance Engagement Data Aggregation Analysis Dissemination Insurers Pharma Universities Government/Public Health Healthcare Delivery Networks Research Institutes Tech Industry All-Inclusive Decentralized ReciprocalTrusted
  25. 25. www.LearningHealth.org
  26. 26. https://lillypad.lilly.com/entry.php?e=8284 www.LearningHealth.org
  27. 27. 104 Endorsements of the LHS Core Values* (As of 5/16/2016) The Center for Learning Health Care Siemens Health Services GE Healthcare IT *To be included on the www.LearningHealth.org website. SecureHealthHub, LLC Department of Primary Care and Public Health Program in Health Informatics, SONHP Veterans Health Administration Office of Informatics & Analytics Division of Health and Social Care Research
  28. 28. www.LearningHealth.org
  29. 29. “… for those of us who have battled against the weariness and ennui most change agents face in the institutions of government and the healthcare industrial complex, we know that this change has been a long time coming, and it’s too late to stop now.” – Hunt Blair, 2015 http://collaborationforlhs.blogspot.com/2015/07/somethings-happening-here.html
  30. 30. Michelle Garber, USAC Vice President, Lifeline Lifeline Program
  31. 31. What is it? The program is undergoing modernization • 13 million households • $9.25 / mo. voice discount ($34.25 tribal) • Eligible through varied social service programs or income • Carriers confirm eligibility
  32. 32. Consumers are eligible for a Lifeline benefit if enrolled in1: • Medicaid • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program • Supplemental Security Income • Federal Public Housing Assistance • Veterans Pension and Survivors Benefit • Income-based eligibility Who can get it? Reside on Tribal lands and participate in a federal or state assistance program such as: • Bureau of Indian Affairs General Assistance • Head Start • Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families • Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations OR 1List reflects criteria effective on the later of December 1, 2016 or 60 days after PRA approval
  33. 33. What services are discounted? Subscribers may receive a discount on either: Current State Future State1 Fixed voice (home phone) Fixed voice (home phone) Mobile voice (cell phone) Mobile voice (cell phone) Fixed broadband Mobile broadband Bundled voice + broadband 1Inclusion of broadband is effective on the later of December 1, 2016 or 60 days after PRA approval
  34. 34. Carrier verifies consumer eligibility Begins delivering discounted services on a monthly basis Carrier reimbursed by USAC based on self- reported subscribers How does it work? Current State: Carrier Verifies Eligibility National Verifier verifies consumer eligibility Consumer selects Lifeline carrier and begins receiving discounted service Carrier reimbursed by USAC based on National Verifier records Future State1: National Verifier 1First phase of National Verifier will be implemented December 31, 2017.
  35. 35. Enabling Responsible Information Sharing and Interoperability  Common Data Taxonomy – Core Semantics https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gmOTpIVxji8  Normative Interoperability Framework– Context Neutral Packaging (ICIF)  Applied Reuse – Context Specific Instantiation(s) …No One Size Fits All
  36. 36. SCC Membership IJIS Institute Programs & Initiatives National Practice Associations Standards Development Organizations Academic & Research Technology/ Engineering Organizations Industry Associations Technology Incubators
  37. 37. SCC Project Interoperability Mission Centric – IS&S Strategic • Policy Automation (ICAM) • Info Security/Safeguarding • Services Adaptability • Standards-based Acquisition • Viability and Sustainability Enablement Centric – ICIF • Common Taxonomy • Common Profile (SIP’s) • Crosscutting Capabilities • Standards Normalization – Project Prototyping (Pipe) • Reference Implementation • IS&S Products http://www.standardscoordination.org/ BusinessWorking Group TechnicalWorking Group Architecture Working Group Outreach and Communications Working Group Performance Measurement Working Group Information Sharing and Access Interagency PolicyCommittee (Government) Security Working Group Privacy Working Group Information Sharing Council (ISC)
  38. 38. Adaptability to Technological Change Human Adaptation Organizational Adaptation Pace of Technological Change Data Use Policy InfoSec/ Safeguarding Digital Integrity
  39. 39. This is NOT a Phone!
  40. 40. Thank You Steven Ambrosini Executive Director IJIS Institute, USA Steve.Ambrosini@ijis.org
  41. 41. Enabling Responsible Information Sharing and Interoperability  Common Data Taxonomy – Core Semantics https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gmOTpIVxji8  Normative Interoperability Framework– Context Neutral Packaging (ICIF)  Applied Reuse – Context Specific Instantiation(s) …No One Size Fits All
  42. 42. SCC Membership IJIS Institute Programs & Initiatives National Practice Associations Standards Development Organizations Academic & Research Technology/ Engineering Organizations Industry Associations Technology Incubators
  43. 43. SCC Project Interoperability Mission Centric – IS&S Strategic • Policy Automation (ICAM) • Info Security/Safeguarding • Services Adaptability • Standards-based Acquisition • Viability and Sustainability Enablement Centric – ICIF • Common Taxonomy • Common Profile (SIP’s) • Crosscutting Capabilities • Standards Normalization – Project Prototyping (Pipe) • Reference Implementation • IS&S Products http://www.standardscoordination.org/ BusinessWorking Group TechnicalWorking Group Architecture Working Group Outreach and Communications Working Group Performance Measurement Working Group Information Sharing and Access Interagency PolicyCommittee (Government) Security Working Group Privacy Working Group Information Sharing Council (ISC)
  44. 44. Adaptability to Technological Change Human Adaptation Organizational Adaptation Pace of Technological Change Data Use Policy InfoSec/ Safeguarding Digital Integrity
  45. 45. This is NOT a Phone!
  46. 46. Thank You Steven Ambrosini Executive Director IJIS Institute, USA Steve.Ambrosini@ijis.org
  47. 47. 2-1-1 is to Social Services what 9-1-1 is to Emergency Services
  48. 48. 211 is an FCC “N11” Assignment 111 - Not Applicable 211 - Information & Referral 411 - Directory Assistance 511 - Transportation 311 - Local Gov’t Services 611 - Telephone Service/Repair 711 – Phone Relay for Disabled 811 – Utility Line ‘Call before you Dig’ 911 - Emergency Police/Fire
  49. 49. 211 directly addresses social determinants of health in real-time • Housing/homelessness support • Crisis call handling for vulnerable populations (violence in the home/protective services, suicide, trauma, victims services, substance use) • Enhancing household resources (food stamps, WIC, health insurance, free/discounted phones & utility assistance, earned income tax credits, work source centers) • Connections to health and mental health services • Target population proficient (parents, seniors, reentry, veterans, people w/disabilities, TAY, HIV/AIDS, etc)
  50. 50. 2-1-1 removes the lack of information as the first barrier to accessing services.
  51. 51. 211s Across the United States Answered 13,964,304 calls in 2015
  52. 52. 211 CA Network Status:  97% Overall State Coverage  37 Counties PUC-approved for 211 Service  21 Counties without 2-1-1  Over 1.6 million Californians called 2-1-1 for help in 2015.
  53. 53. 2-1-1 is a rich data source for local, regional and national service needs/gaps, with untapped potential as a gateway for Community Information Exchange.
  54. 54. 5 In 2015, 211 services across the US answered calls equivalent to 12% of all US households The most prominent problem/needs were: • Housing = 18% of total calls • Utilities Payment Assistance = 12% • Food and Meals = 8.5% • Health Care = 7% • Income Support and Assistance = 7% • Mental Health and Addictions = 7%
  55. 55. 11,301 67,152 9,288 36,937 31,501 317,298 245,140 526,562 163,751 162,078 181,329 180,745 149,382 44,568 34,672 203,584 10,166 Arts, Culture & Recreation Clothing, Personal & Household Disaster Services Education Employment Food & Meals Health Care Housing Income Support & Assistance Individual, Family & Community Support Information Services Legal, Consumer & Public Safety Mental Health & Addictions Other Government/Economic Services Transportation Utilities Assistance Volunteers & Donations - 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 211 California Network Problem-Needs for 2015 Total = 2,309,425
  56. 56. Who we serve: Our Callers 85% earn less than 2,000 a month 20% are families with children age 0-5 73% are renters 44% are Latino and 34% African-American 5
  57. 57. 6
  58. 58. Comprehensive Services: 211 Hub Role • Supports the regional “No Wrong Door” policies • Acts as gateway to social service network • Leverages non-profit, gov’t & faith-based resources – builds collaboration • Provides navigation and simplifies system complexity – links silos • Strengthens continuums of care 61
  59. 59. Our professional, knowledgeable and caring Community Resource Specialists are trained to respond to a variety of call types, including basic needs, disaster information, and crisis situations. They also assess for unstated needs. Ourcore:Trained Specialists “Since you need help paying bills, you might also be interested in CalFresh or Lifeline.” 6
  60. 60. Additional Assessment Includes: SNAP/Food Stamps Earned Income Tax Credits Health Insurance Lifeline Free Phones Internet access 63
  61. 61. 211 Resource Databases Contains Comprehensive Listing of CURATED Community Services/Programs 64
  62. 62. Online Access Features Guided and Specialized Search 65
  63. 63. Disaster Role • Non-emergency disaster information • Real-time info to OEM / Public Health • Assessment of needs • Rumor control • Damage reporting • 24/7, multi-lingual public information dissemination • Handle large number of public inquiries and call surges Easy to remember 3-digit dialing code replaces multiple “hotlines” and 800#’s. Staff expertise eliminates many misdirected calls and reduces non-emergency 911 calls. 66
  64. 64. Opportunities/Challenges: Standardized - Underutilized • National operating standards through the Alliance of Information and Referral Systems industry association (AIRS) • AIRS agency accreditation/staff certification • Internationally adopted resource database indexing system: 211 Taxonomy of Health/Human Services www.211taxonomy.org • Local focus/national coverage – trusted community resource/non-profit driven 67
  65. 65. Finding a 2-1-1 Near You… www.211.org
  66. 66. Networks in Action: Scaling Initiatives across Jurisdictions Moderator: Adam Pertman, Senior Consultant, Stewards of Change Institute Presenters: • Alison Rein, Senior Director, Evidence Generation and Translation, AcademyHealth – Community Health Peer Learning Program, supported by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT • Clare Tanner, PhD, Program Director, Center for Data Management and Translational Research Michigan, Public Health Institute – Data Across Sectors for Health, supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation • Katherine Klosek, Senior Implementation Advisor – The Center for Government Excellence, a partner of the Bloomberg Philanthropies What Works Cities Initiative • Valerie N. Rogers, MPH, Director, State Government Affairs, HIMSS North America – Increased Interoperability across the Spectrum of Care • Steven Posnack, MPH, Director, Office of Standards & Technology, Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, HHS – Interoperability Data Proving Ground
  67. 67. Stewards of Change 11th Annual National Symposium Networks in Action • Alison Rein Director, Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP); Senior Director, Evidence Generation and Translation, AcademyHealth • Clare Tanner Co-Director, Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH); Program Director, Michigan Public Health Institute
  68. 68. All In: Data for Community Health 1. Support a data movement that empowers communities to address social determinants of health 2. Build an evidence base for the field of multi-sector data use to improve health 3. Stimulate and support peer learning and collaboration
  69. 69. DASH and CHP are All In! Community Health Peer Learning Program (CHP)  NPO: AcademyHealth, Washington DC; with National Partnership for Women & Families and NORC as partners  Funded by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT  15 communities: 10 Participant and 5 Subject Matter Expert Data Across Sectors for Health (DASH)  NPO: Illinois Public Health Institute in partnership with the Michigan Public Health Institute  Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation  10 communities
  70. 70. DASH and CHP Theory of Change Shared data and information Multi-sector Collaboration Outcome: Capacity Building to Drive Community Health Improvement
  71. 71. The Metcalfe Network Effect
  72. 72. All In is a learning collaboration
  73. 73. Total Network of 25 Projects  10 projects – DASH Cohort  15 projects – CHP Cohort
  74. 74. Geographic Scale 0 2 4 6 8 Metropolitan Area Neighborhood Tribal Area State Multiple Neighborhoods Multi-County Region City or Town County CHP DASH
  75. 75. Sectors Represented 0 5 10 15 20 Health care Social services Other CBOs Public health Research/academia Housing Behavioral health Education HIE Criminal justice Planning, economic and/or communtiy… Local government (executive level) Transportation Tribal CHP DASH
  76. 76. Data Types / Sources 0 5 10 15 20 Admin data (social services, education) Electronic health records Public records Admin data (health care, e.g.,… Public health Geographic (e.g., aggregated regionally) HIE Survey/ focus group Other CHP DASH
  77. 77. Diversity of DASH/CHP Project objectives • Coordinated care • Population health management • Community health risk reduction Target populations & conditions • Chronic disease • Serious and persistent mental illness • People with disabilities • Homeless • High utilizers • Injury and poisoning • Children, adults, elderly Socio-ecological Model
  78. 78. Lead Sector and Impact Level 4 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 3 1 2 1 1 2 4 2 1 1 Health System/Clinic (5) Public Health Dept (5) HIE/Beacon (3) Research (3) Social Services (2) Tribal Health Dept (1) Behavioral Health (1) Coordinated care (individual) Family centered care (interpersonal) Population health management Community risk reduction
  79. 79. Learning from 43 Projects: Technical challenges  Partners are ready, but vendors are not; vendor solutions are often clunky with poor user interface  Patient/client matching is hard and under resourced  Building technical interfaces for multiple EHR systems is time and resource intensive, and not scalable  Few standards exist for capture, sharing and integration of social determinants data elements
  80. 80. Learning from 43 Projects: Governance challenges  Policies on data sharing differ by sector, and within government  Establishing trust relationships within healthcare is (very) hard; tougher still with increased number and nature of partners  HIPAA provides useful frame for data use within healthcare absent consent, but this does not (necessarily) extend to other sectors / other use cases.
  81. 81. Indicators of Progress Enabling Factors • Community collaboration • Resources • Data & technology infrastructure System Features • Structure and process • Governance • Workflow • Training • Technical factors • User- orientation • Timeliness • Interoperability Successful Use Cases • Number and variety of use cases • Participating sectors • Usefulness • Acceptability • Sustainability
  82. 82. Collaboration: A national perspective  Organizational missions both drive and inhibit collaboration  Collaboration slows down the work, at least initially  In-person encounters are critical to relationship building  Meaningful peer-to-peer collaboration must be staffed  Opportunities for learning exist at ALL levels: • NPO-to-NPO • Grantee-to-grantee  Distributed leadership requires clear delineation and documentation of roles, responsibilities and accountability  Honesty, respect, and compassion are key ingredients  It helps (a lot) to like your collaborators
  83. 83. Our Role: To listen, identify, characterize, and then (try) to help resolve  As two coordinating nodes on the All In network, DASH and CHP are continuously:  Monitoring and reflecting back what we hear as being major challenges and areas of mutual concern  Cultivating opportunities for peer-learning and collaboration  This is often an organic process, but sometimes we explicitly ask  With a collective cohort of 43, we have started to solicit feedback regarding key challenges and (early) lessons learned
  84. 84. Four Tiers to Build the All In Network
  85. 85. Go All In!  Sign up for news at dashconnect.org  Follow us at @DASH_connect and @AcademyHealth #CHPhealthIT
  86. 86. City Strategies to Improve Health Outcomes Katherine Klosek Senior Implementation Advisor Center for Government Excellence at Johns Hopkins University | What Works Cities
  87. 87. Source: Baltimore City Health Department 2011 Neighborhood Health Profiles
  88. 88. Source: Baltimore City Health Department 2011 Neighborhood Health Profiles
  89. 89. Source: Baltimore City Health Department 2011 Neighborhood Health Profiles
  90. 90. Denton, TX | Open Data Day Hackathon The city and its partners created a map illustrating location of health care services, and concentration of health care needs Dashboard Next Steps: ● Identify new data sources from Denton County ● Identify metrics for homelessness, poverty, etc. ● Create food desert map
  91. 91. Dataset Data Owner Business Licenses Department of Business Affairs and Consumer Protection Food Inspection History Health & Human Services Crime Chicago Police Department's CLEAR (Citizen Law Enforcement Analysis and Reporting Garbage Cart Requests Department of Streets and Sanitation Sanitation Code Complaints Department of Streets and Sanitation Weather forecast.io
  92. 92. Increased Interoperability Across the Spectrum of Care Valerie N. Rogers, MPH, Director, HIMSS State Government Affairs June 14, 2016
  93. 93. HIMSS is at the crossroad of health & IT Health IT
  94. 94. Membership engagement Individual Members: 64,000+ Corporate Members: 625+ Non-Profit Partner Members: 420+ Organizational Affiliate Clients: 430+ Volunteers work with HIMSS to improve the quality, cost- effectiveness, access, and value of healthcare through IT 20,000+ Chapter Members: 57,000+ Chapter Leaders: 740+ Chapters: 55 Communities: 10 Roundtables: 11 SIGs: 9 Committees: 15
  95. 95. IT’s Role is Fundamental • Fosters open, responsible data sharing with the highest regard to participant privacy, and puts engaged participants at the center of research efforts • Timing is perfect – Americans increasingly engaged in health & technology; – Foundational IT widely implemented; – Genomic analysis costs dropped significantly; – Data science increasingly sophisticated; and, – Mobile technologies widely available and often affordable. • Profound IT policy, governance, and execution challenges around security, interoperability, C&BI
  96. 96. Focused on equipping stakeholders with resources, education and community to deliver the HIMSS mission HIMSS North America Credible, Pragmatic Approach Quarterly, over 300 resources. White Papers Resources Education One of a Kind and Comprehensive Focused on Health and Health IT Community Like minded professionals and peers. Best practices/Learning 54 Chapters 15 Committees
  97. 97. The most practical way to stay ahead of health IT trends, insights and solutions for HIT HIMSS Analytics Healthcare industry’s most powerful IT information • Extensive coverage • Predictive capabilities • Industry's broadest and fastest source of data Data Consulting A coach that helps you continually improve in order to stay ahead of the competition. • Experts and Specialists • Analytics driven insights Maturity Models We created the industry standards that are shaping tomorrow • EMRAM 2.0 • A-EMRAM • CCMM • Logic Offerings
  98. 98. On the Horizon • Interoperability: Ensure that data are flowing to allow for improved health care efficiency. Data sources include: • Medicaid, Medicare, and private sector claims data • Clinical data: EMR, Labs, Pharmacy, ADT, behavioral health, etc. • Non-clinical data: social services, corrections, homeless database, etc. • Analytics: Beyond program integrity (which is critical), make services available to state health care leaders and others to improve the efficiency of health care system. • Significant focus on their own purchasing: • Medicaid and CHIP • State Employee and Retiree • State HIX • Public Health • Health System Transformation (Aid in health care system improving itself) • Opioid Addiction & Automated Prescription Reporting Systems • Increased telemedicine/telehealth • Open source results and/or analytic capabilities • Health research • Surveillance (Zika, Ebola, Influenza) • Etc.
  99. 99. Deep Dive into Building Community- Based Solutions to Connect for Public Health Regional/Chapter Level Engagement: • Longitudinal health record and increased connectedness across clinical, behavioral, public/population health and human services – Federal and State Health IT Policies/Regulations – Infrastructure, technology, tools – Care management and treatment – Research – Population Health – Consumer access to information
  100. 100. • Education – Content – Virtual events – Regional events and conferences – Podcasts – Research – HIMSS17 • Career Services – Certifications • CAHIMS • CPHIMS HIMSS engagement • JobMine • ConCert By HIMSS • Value Suite – Value Score • HIMSS Global –HIMSS Analytics –HIMSS Innovation Center –PCHA –HIMSS Media • HIMSS17 Annual Conference
  101. 101. Thank you! Valerie N. Rogers, MPH Director, State Government Affairs HIMSS vrogers@himss.org
  102. 102. Networks in Action: Scaling Initiatives across Jurisdictions Stewards of Change 11 Steven Posnack | ONC
  103. 103. Pilot Rich…Proof Poor  Great work and experimentation going on.  Yet, it’s hard to know who’s doing what and how to collaborate.  Can we promote more kinetic inspiration? 110
  104. 104. The Interoperability Proving Ground 111 https://www.healthit.gov/techlab/ipg/
  105. 105. But wait… there’s more! 112
  106. 106. What can you do?  Check it out!  Spread the word  Subscribe  Share 113

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