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Michael Haley Goldman
Future Projects
2016
Museums, libraries, and archives share the
commonality of stuff - lots of stuff,
abundance.
Roy Rosenzweig formulated this...
To put that in perspective. Our stuff is
not so big but we are still confronted
with more content being digitized than
we ...
Curation - funny word, going through a bit of
an identity crises at the moment. Two sides
of the coin - in our museum they...
USHMM creates exhibitions and runs
educational programs.
USHMM actively collects broad material
evidence of the Holocaust - archival
documentation, objects, oral histories, film,
...
The USHMM hosts workshops, conferences
as well as running academic fellowships for
undergraduates to senior scholars.
The USHMM develops leadership programs
for police, judges, the military, and other
groups that play an important role in
m...
The USHMM also works to better understand
and prevent genocide today. Programs
reach leaders and policy makers in the US
a...
Crowdsourcing - as a technique within
cultural institutions (not perfect but well
developed)
Museums have been flirting wi...
Mechanical Turk sums up a lot of what we
imagine work done by the crowd to be -
something that computers SHOULD be able
to...
Microsoft’s Captionbot made public in April
2016 shows there is continuing progress on
computer description but it is stil...
We love crowds…
...we have been impressed by the great
crowdsourcing and transcriptions projects
that have been created fo...
In cooperation with Ancestry.com - the
Museum’s World Memory project has
transcribed over 1 million records from
Holocaust...
The Museum also helped developed the
Early Warning Project that taps into a crowd
of experts to draw attention to areas at...
And the Museum has done a lot of other
small projects like this tagging experiment
with Tiltfactor’s Metadata Games.
Citizen History for us (and I don’t know if we
were the first ones to use it this way) was a
direct reference to Citizen S...
We didn’t call our “Children of the Lodz
Ghetto” project a crowdsourcing project. As
Elissa Frankle and others have talked...
All of our previous work led to the 2016
launch of a full fledged (nationwide) Citizen
History project called “History Unf...
Research and
Educational
Goals
Collections and
Access Goals
Volunteers
Quality results
Active communities
Outreach
Crowdso...
Citizen History, as a concept, is at some level
a response to the need for creating
interpretation of massive collections ...
Again - all rooted in the stuff of museums,
libraries, and archives.
Thank you - comments and questions
appreciated.
End
Photo: British Library
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Curation, crowds, and big data

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2016 Presentation as part of DCIC/KCL Digital Archival Science Symposium

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Curation, crowds, and big data

  1. 1. Michael Haley Goldman Future Projects 2016
  2. 2. Museums, libraries, and archives share the commonality of stuff - lots of stuff, abundance. Roy Rosenzweig formulated this question in an article for the American Historical Review in 2003 “Historians, in fact, may be facing a fundamental paradigm shift from a culture of scarcity to a culture of abundance.” Museums, libraries, archives, public historians, etc are facing this same shift. Stat from Mary Meeker in 2014, over 1.8 billion images were being uploaded and shared every day on just four of the top social media sites.
  3. 3. To put that in perspective. Our stuff is not so big but we are still confronted with more content being digitized than we can handle by our existing practices and staff allotments. Functionally, our content is Big By Our Standards (BBOS) - so we will still need to understand, apply, and expand on the techniques of big data to the work of museums and museum collections. 1.8 Billion Images uploaded to 4 social media services daily. You are here.
  4. 4. Curation - funny word, going through a bit of an identity crises at the moment. Two sides of the coin - in our museum they are entirely different functions: description and interpretation. Photo from P C
  5. 5. USHMM creates exhibitions and runs educational programs.
  6. 6. USHMM actively collects broad material evidence of the Holocaust - archival documentation, objects, oral histories, film, etc.
  7. 7. The USHMM hosts workshops, conferences as well as running academic fellowships for undergraduates to senior scholars.
  8. 8. The USHMM develops leadership programs for police, judges, the military, and other groups that play an important role in maintaining democracy.
  9. 9. The USHMM also works to better understand and prevent genocide today. Programs reach leaders and policy makers in the US and internationally.
  10. 10. Crowdsourcing - as a technique within cultural institutions (not perfect but well developed) Museums have been flirting with the crowd since AT least 2006 (some would say much earlier) Crowdsourcing has often been used to support the curation task to create descriptions for objects in collections (the descriptions side of the coin).
  11. 11. Mechanical Turk sums up a lot of what we imagine work done by the crowd to be - something that computers SHOULD be able to do but can’t yet.
  12. 12. Microsoft’s Captionbot made public in April 2016 shows there is continuing progress on computer description but it is still not quite right. This image is Nazi propagandist Julius Streicher at Nuremberg - even if visually described correctly it might not tell you much about the contents of the image.
  13. 13. We love crowds… ...we have been impressed by the great crowdsourcing and transcriptions projects that have been created for museums, archives, and other cultural institutions. (examples from the Steve Project to Transcribe Bentham to the SI Transcription Center and on and on… Also note the great critique of the term Crowd Sourcing by Stuart Dunn. We Crowds Photo Adapted from Georg Sander
  14. 14. In cooperation with Ancestry.com - the Museum’s World Memory project has transcribed over 1 million records from Holocaust documents.
  15. 15. The Museum also helped developed the Early Warning Project that taps into a crowd of experts to draw attention to areas at risk of genocide.
  16. 16. And the Museum has done a lot of other small projects like this tagging experiment with Tiltfactor’s Metadata Games.
  17. 17. Citizen History for us (and I don’t know if we were the first ones to use it this way) was a direct reference to Citizen Science projects as they were developed by groups like the Cornell Lab of O and as now can be found through sites like Zooniverse… From Citizen Science we borrowed some ideas for the Lodz Children Project, most importantly: - starting from the research question - not the collection, - placing a community manager at the center of the project, and - making an educator (and educational goals) integral to the project. Photo: Peter Lindberg
  18. 18. We didn’t call our “Children of the Lodz Ghetto” project a crowdsourcing project. As Elissa Frankle and others have talked about in the past - we’ve described that project as a “Citizen History” project - soufflé for everyone! This stresses that the project is geared towards our educational and research goals not archival/collections needs.
  19. 19. All of our previous work led to the 2016 launch of a full fledged (nationwide) Citizen History project called “History Unfolded.” This project asks the public to help us better understand how Americans understood the events that we now call the Holocaust by capturing how events were reported in their local news.
  20. 20. Research and Educational Goals Collections and Access Goals Volunteers Quality results Active communities Outreach Crowdsourcing Citizen History Citizen History and Crowdsourcing lots of overlap Summary of differences of starting point for Crowdsourcing and Citizen History for the USHMM. They have similar results but very different goals.
  21. 21. Citizen History, as a concept, is at some level a response to the need for creating interpretation of massive collections in a less traditional way. Historians, educators, and experts are not interpreting everything but are, instead, creating a scaffold where joint meaning making occurs with the public. (This addresses the curation as interpretation side of the coin). We will need many other ideas for creating open ended interpretation environments with the big data that we are creating. These ideas will not cede meaning making to the masses nor give sole authority to the experts. These will be spaces of participatory, navigated construction. Photo: Martin Griffiths
  22. 22. Again - all rooted in the stuff of museums, libraries, and archives.
  23. 23. Thank you - comments and questions appreciated. End Photo: British Library

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