The Workability approach
What is Workability? Workability is the match, or balance, between an individual’s personal capacities and resources and t...
The Workability Model
Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environment, management WORKABILITY <ul>...
<ul><li>Knowledge and skills: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On-the-job-training ...
Values, attitudes and motivation Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environ...
Life course approach   Life course 20 60 Age Life cycle 20 60 Age
Work demands Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environment, management WOR...
Operational environment  Aged Care in Australia  Society Culture Legislation Education policy Social and health policy
Family Close community
Society Family Close community Society Culture Legislation Education policy Social and health policy <ul><li>Society, cult...
The Workability Model
Measuring Workability <ul><ul><li>Original measuring tool is the  </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Workability Index (WAI) </li></ul...
What the WAS involves <ul><ul><li>Introduction to Workability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informed consent </li></ul></ul><...
Would you like to learn more about Workability? Explore www.meteorworkability.com.au
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Introducing Workability

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  • Personal resources = health, functional capacity, knowledge, skills and competencies, attitudes, motivation, personal and social support systems Life course approach – acknowledge that change is inevitable and access to support resilience to adapt to change is a key Emphasise what’s in it for us – Today our objective is to inspire you to get involved , in two ways by demonstrating the potential of Workability and the explaining our offer of support to explore how this approach could be of benefit to you personally, Your involnvement will help to build the evidence base for expansion of this apporaoch in the broader Austrralian community, Our focus on in paid &amp; unpaid age care work Facts about the ageing workforce and what it means for us An introduction to Workability The opportunity to help with research in the area
  • Autonomic system Senses Nutrition, exercise, sleep, recovery, stimulants Hobbies 6 volunteers for pedometer to give a snap shot of physical demands over the week, steps per day
  • Skills for information (cant function without this). Not only CEOs but all should understand this Skills for transfer of knowledge. Am I able and willing to do this? Tell us what you leanrt in the past year. What new learning also by age? What benefits have you from the training? Skills for information – skills for transfer of knowledge
  • Meaning of work will differ at various life stages Harmony of values Sense of work Surveys of value Commitment/interest/requirement to continue working Informs our self-capabilities
  • from youth to retirement Ilmarinen E ditorial Scand J Work Environ Health 2009;35(1):1–5 Work ability—a comprehensive concept for occupational health research and prevention Work ability is primarily a question of a balance between work and personal resources. In practice, people search for an optimal balance throughout their entire worklife. This optimal balance may be very different in different phases of worklife. In order to find a balance, work and personal resources need to be continuously combined. Personal resources change, for example, with age, whereas work demands change, for example, with globalization and new technology. The factors affecting work ability are therefore continuously changing.
  • Organisation of work = work processes, working times Work community = psychosocial environment Physical work environment – inc ergonomics Management, leadership; also personal supervisory tasks; ie role of individual or organisation Stress = physical, mental and social
  • Technology, services Clients, customers = part of the interest groups Influenced by: Globalisation and technology Work organisations Services Interest groups Labour demand and future prospects Infrastructure, transport
  • Married, single, co-habitating, children/dependants, divorced, widowed Variables of ‘family’ include: Relationship status Responsibilities and home duties Economic security, income Needs for closeness and security Local community support networks and friends Includes: Human relations Leisure time Hobbies If out of home, positive effect on Workability Resources for close relationships Resources for care
  • Policies and services = social, health, education, employment Productivity Commission 2008 “Trends in Aged Care services: some implications” Over the next 40 years, population ageing and growing diversity among older people — in terms of their care needs, preferences and affluence — are expected to pose a number of challenges to Australia&apos;s aged care system. These include: a significant increase in demand — those aged over 85 tend to be the main users of aged care services, and their numbers are expected to increase at least four-fold by 2047 the changing pattern of disease among the aged is expected to increase the proportion of frail older people with more complex care needs an increased preference for independent living arrangements supported by community care, and a desire for greater autonomy and choice in aged care services generally many of the aged having higher levels of income and wealth with which to leverage services, although significant numbers — over three quarters of those of age pension age — will continue to be eligible for the age pension needing to secure a significant expansion in the aged care workforce at a time of &apos;aged induced&apos; tightening of the labour market, accentuated by competing demands from the acute care sector. The policy implications of these prospective challenges are broad ranging and complex. This study highlights several areas where further analysis seems called for to aid the development of an improved framework for aged care, including: assessing the potential for unbundling residential care (that is, accommodation, everyday living and personal care costs) to better reflect the underlying costs of these services and enable better targeting of public subsides to those most in need examining the current dual gate-keeping system and the scope to improve it by dispensing with the planning and allocation system (while retaining accreditation) and relying on the entitlement for aged care services established by aged care assessment teams considering the feasibility of introducing &apos;consumer-centred&apos; care arrangements to enhance the potential for older people to influence the nature and scope of the services they receive looking at ways of improving responsiveness in aged care education and training arrangements and extending scopes of practice to overcome inefficiencies and inflexibilities in the workforce.
  • Australian measure developed based on local research Part of this phase of the research is to pilot the concept and Australian measure in the aged care sector, further building the evidence base &amp; validity of the measure in the Australian context International data consistently demonstrates that Workability as a multifactorial concept can be usefully measured and can be improved regardless of age or impact of health &amp; well-being interventions Pre- and post-assessments = effectiveness of interventions, including training Tools, products &amp; resources now being tailored these to aged care industry
  • Introducing Workability

    1. 1. The Workability approach
    2. 2. What is Workability? Workability is the match, or balance, between an individual’s personal capacities and resources and the demands of their work.
    3. 3. The Workability Model
    4. 4. Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environment, management WORKABILITY <ul><ul><li>Lifestyle, diet, exercise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fitness, stamina </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stress, mental health </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heredity </li></ul></ul>Health and functional capacities
    5. 5. <ul><li>Knowledge and skills: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On-the-job-training </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confidence </li></ul></ul>Competence Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environment, management WORKABILITY
    6. 6. Values, attitudes and motivation Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environment, management WORKABILITY <ul><ul><li>Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meaningful work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Job Satisfaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Professional ethics </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Life course approach Life course 20 60 Age Life cycle 20 60 Age
    8. 8. Work demands Health and functional capacities Competence Values, attitudes and motivation Work environment, management WORKABILITY <ul><ul><li>Organisation of work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management, leadership </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Work tools and methods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physical work environment </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Operational environment Aged Care in Australia Society Culture Legislation Education policy Social and health policy
    10. 10. Family Close community
    11. 11. Society Family Close community Society Culture Legislation Education policy Social and health policy <ul><li>Society, culture, legislation and policy: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Population structure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Culture and values </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Policies and services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social partners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trade unions, employers, state </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. The Workability Model
    13. 13. Measuring Workability <ul><ul><li>Original measuring tool is the </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Workability Index (WAI) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Workability Survey (WAS) has been developed in Australia by BWA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current research on validating new tools to reflect the extended Workability model </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pre- and post- tests used to measure effectiveness of interventions </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. What the WAS involves <ul><ul><li>Introduction to Workability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informed consent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A confidential questionnaire </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data analysis to provide a workforce profile and identify opportunities to promote & maintain high workability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Report & recommendations for design & facilitation of intervention/s </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Would you like to learn more about Workability? Explore www.meteorworkability.com.au

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