Strategies for implementing an efficient e-waste management system - David Rochat

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Strategies for implementing an efficient e-waste management system - David Rochat

  1. 1. Strategies for an efficient and controled management of e-waste Skopje, 23 rd November 2011 David Rochat, SOFIES [email_address]
  2. 2. Contents <ul><li>Why is e-waste a problem and why do / should we care? </li></ul><ul><li>Where to start and how to go forward </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why is e-waste a problem and why do/should we care?
  4. 4. Why is e-waste an issue?
  5. 5. The problems related to e-waste <ul><li>E-waste management poses problems of two kinds: </li></ul><ul><li>Because of its toxic content, dumping e-waste into the environment will contaminate to soil and groundwater </li></ul><ul><li> indirect contamination of communities </li></ul><ul><li>Because of improper recycling practices, can affect the workers, their communities and the environment </li></ul>
  6. 6. Wild dumping of e-waste
  7. 7. Wild dumping of e-waste
  8. 8. The problems related to e-waste <ul><li>E-waste management poses problems of two kinds: </li></ul><ul><li>Because of its toxic content, dumping e-waste into the environment will contaminate to soil and groundwater </li></ul><ul><li> indirect contamination of communities </li></ul><ul><li>Because of improper recycling practices, can affect the workers, their communities and the environment </li></ul>
  9. 9. Improper recycling practices
  10. 10. Improper recycling practices
  11. 11. Improper recycling practices
  12. 12. Keller, 2005 Low efficiency (data from the informal sector in India)
  13. 13. Low efficiency : not any better in the formal sector!
  14. 14. How can a maximal value be recovered?
  15. 15. Electronics industry: a big consumer of resources
  16. 16. The (lost?) opportunities related to e-waste <ul><li>E-waste management can present fabulous opportunities: </li></ul><ul><li>Because of its valuable content, e-waste recycling can create added value to the recycling sector </li></ul><ul><li>The recovery of metals and other valuable materials gives privileged access to expensive resources </li></ul><ul><li>Some materials contained in e-waste are very rare  controlling such materials provides strategic advantages to national economies (e.g. Indium, predicted first natural element we will run out of) </li></ul><ul><li> Improper recycling practices lead to a loss of value! </li></ul>
  17. 17. So, where do we start ?
  18. 18. Conduct a nation-wide e-waste assessment: know what’s going on <ul><ul><li>the description and assessment of e-waste management practices in the formal and the informal sector </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>assessment of mass flows </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>potential impact to human health and the environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>an assessment of needs to ensure environmentally sound management, and a detailed description of the legal and regulatory infrastructures in place </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recommendations for the development of an environmentally sound management policies for e-waste management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The results of the country assessments are shared with all stakeholders </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Result of national assessment (Example) 1 2 3 End-of-life equipment from corporate consumer: - Often declared as „donation“ for cheap disposal <ul><li>Material recovery in the informal sector: </li></ul><ul><li>Manual dismantling of hazardous component </li></ul><ul><li>Wires and cable burning </li></ul><ul><li>precious metal recovery in a hazardous manner (e.g. gold leaching) </li></ul><ul><li>Informal dumping and burning: </li></ul><ul><li>Emissions from dumped residues </li></ul><ul><li>Emissions from informal burning sites </li></ul>Consume Collect Recover Dispose F unction M aterial E nergy Private Consumer Informal Sector System Boundary Informal Dumping & Burning 1 2 3 Importers Manufacturers Retailer Informal Collector Imports (Donations) Corporate Consumer Scrap Dealers Middlemen (Auctions) Landfill Repair & Refurbish
  20. 20. Develop a Framework for a National Strategy (Example) Consume Collect Recover Dispose F unction M aterial E nergy Private Consumer System Boundary Middlemen (Auctions) Informal Dumping & Burning Policy & Legislation Business & Finance Technology & Skills Intervention Mechanisms: <ul><li>Licensing </li></ul><ul><li>Legislation </li></ul><ul><li>Technical control and fixed contracts </li></ul><ul><li>New business models </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge and technology transfer </li></ul><ul><li>Formalizing the informal sector </li></ul><ul><li>Trainings </li></ul>Marketing & Awareness <ul><li>Information Campaigns on all levels </li></ul>Monitoring & Control <ul><li>Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Audits </li></ul><ul><li>Monitoring Massflows </li></ul>Importers Manufacturers Retailer Informal Collector Large Recyclers Imports (Donations) Corporate Consumer Authorized Dealers Landfill Repair & Refurbish Smelter Refinery Small recyclers
  21. 21. Conclusion <ul><li>e-waste presents a threat, as much as it presents an opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>there is no simple answer  tackle the problem from its different aspects (education, legal, technical, economic, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>A proper management strategy can significantly reduce threats and increase opportunities </li></ul><ul><li> Many nations have started to react </li></ul><ul><li> Join the global network! </li></ul>
  22. 22. THANK YOU FOR YOUR ATTENTION! <ul><li>www.ewasteguide.info </li></ul>[email_address]

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