Clast.final progressreport 2005

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This archival document is the progress report of the Research Centre for Learning and Social Transformation for the period 2002-2005 as part of our submission for recognition as Designated Research Group in the College of Social and Health Sciences, University of Western Sydney, 2005.

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Clast.final progressreport 2005

  1. 1. 1 PROGRESS REPORT 2002-2005 CENTRE FOR LEARNING AND SOCIAL TRANSFORM ATION RESEARCH TRAINING CONCENTRATION (CLAST) Authors (alphabetical order): Dr Merilyn Childs & Dr Regine Wagner. School of Social, Organisational and Community Studies, University of Western Sydney.We present below our progress report for the period 2002-2005 as part of our submissionfor recognition as Designated Research Group in the College of Social and HealthSciences. It demonstrates CLAST has continued to grow in the reporting period in allresearch performance indicators and in membership.IntroductionThe Centre for Learning and Social Transformation (CLAST) is built on integrating researchactivities, community partnerships, and teaching foci of its members. Our work is anexpression of the German tradition of social pedagogy [sozialpädagogik] which we explorein the Australian context through questions about social exclusion and inclusion in highereducation, the labour market, and as a consequence of social and educational reforms.The Centre adopts a clear position in relation to its theoretical stances. These are based inMarxist analysis, critical theory and radical democratic humanism. These stancesunderpin research and developmental activities and the social justice orientation of theCentres goals and aspirations.The Centre utilises Boyers (1990) concept of the scholarship of engagement as the basisof scholarly pursuits. That is, the Centres work is empirical, and is conducted with non-university partners. Through critical social pedagogy, our group distances itself from,and critiques, dominant neo-capitalist discourses. RESEARCH PROGRAM DEV ELOPMENTDuring 2002 - 2004 the Centre has continued to develop its research programs in theareas of o Community Services Research Program o Fire Services Research Program o Learning , Work and Organisations Research program From 2004
  2. 2. o Creative Expressions Research Program 1. COMMUNITY SERVICE S RESEARCH PROGRAMCLAST has been working beside and researching in to the community services sector. Inpartnership with the Association of Childrens’ Welfare Agencies, incorporation g theCentre for Community Welfare Training the CLAST has developed a research programfocussing on community service organisations as workplaces.The partnership was first established in 1996 and has grown considerably since then. Itsmain aims are the support of workforce development in the community services sectorand the improvement of working conditions for managers and frontline workers in theindustry.To this end we have established projects in the areas of1. Paucity Management in community services organisations Job satisfaction and staff morale Management and leadership responsibilities Partnerships and collaborations2. Work-based learning for the community services industry. Graduate Diploma in Social Sciences (Community Services)I) PAUCITY MANAGEMENT:Dr Regine Wagner’s research in this area has led to the development of ‘PaucityManagement’ as a new category for the description and analysis of management andworkplace practices under conditions of resource poverty in the community servicesindustry. Exploring in depth organisational responses in the areas of service delivery,collaborations and relationships between workers, managers and managementcommitteees, the research is contributing new insights into the ‘black box’ of smallcommunity organisations. Sue Mlcek and Ann Jensen are currently undertaking their PhDstudies in this area.II) WORKBASED LEARNING FOR THE COMMUNITY SERVICESINDUSTRYCLAST has combined its expertise in adult education with its research in the communityservices industry to develop an accessible professional development process forcommunity sector workers. This takes the shape of a Graduate Diploma in SocialSciences (Community Services). The Graduate Diploma is a workbased degree thatcombines traditional and non- traditional entry requirements to provide access toexperienced workers in the industry. The Graduate Diploma is jointly taught by UWS 2
  3. 3. and ACWA /CCWT staff. At its core are workbased projects undertaken by students intheir workplaces, which aim at the improvement of aspects of their organisations. Thisactivity feeds directly into the ‘learning and work’ research program and is subject to aPhD study. 2. FIRE SERVICES RES EARCH PROGRAMDuring 2000-2003 the title for the Fire Services Research Program was called “Towards aResearch Culture in the NSWFB”, generalized to “Towards a Research Culture in theAustralian Fire Services” towards the middle of 2003. It was very successful in attractingindustry funds as a basis for applied research and for building IP and brand recognition inthe industry – over $500,000 over a 5 year period.However, CLAST began a strategic review of the Fire Services Research Program in late2003, and a decision was taken to align our activities more strongly to two keyCommonwealth Government policy agendas, and less strongly on the applied researchneeds of one industry partner.The two key national policy agendas that shaped our review were: 1. Productive Diversity [2001]; and 2. Research Priority 4: Safeguarding Australia [ARC National Research Priorities, 2004-2005]1.This review reflected a number of issues:Firstly, it was felt that the focus of the first three years of the fire services researchprogram (2000-2003) had achieved considerable outcomes for the industry partner at thetime (NSWFB), but these outcomes were inevitably tied the FSRP to a “researchdevelopment” agenda, and limited our capacity to achieve DEST recognized outcomes,research independence, and competitive grants.Secondly, the Bushfire Research CRC launched its research priority areas in 2003, andthese failed to recognize or place priority on the “sociology of disasters” in Australia, andthis has left a “gap” in knowledge production in this discipline area. Our work with thefire services makes us ideally placed to lead this research agenda in Australia. It alsomakes us highly placed to respond in innovative ways to the “Safeguarding Australia”research agenda; particularly1 http://www.arc.gov.au/pdf/2004_designated_national_research_priorities_&_associate.pdf 3
  4. 4. “enhancing our nation’s understanding of social, political and cultural issues will help Australia to engage with our neighbours and the wider global community and to respond to emerging issues.”We are working towards developing a convincing argument as to the links between“productive diversity” [including the gendered nature of emergency management] and“Safeguarding Australia”- an argument well accepted in Europe, but with poor uptake inAustralia. During 2004-5 our focus is being placed on refining this argument throughliterature review and theorization.Thirdly, it was felt that, given limited resources and the need for coherence betweenCLAST’s four RP areas, the FSRP needed to more strongly reflect the priorities ofCLAST. We felt a need to reappraise the coherence of our activities, to ensure that ourfoci could be recognized as characteristically expressing CLAST values; such as anexploration of “learning and social transformation”; “critical social pedagogy”. It wasclear that a strong but as yet poorly maximized intersection existed between the CLAST“Learning and Work RP” and the CLAST “Fire Services RP”, particularly as it related tosocial justice and productive diversity.We were keen to capture a research market that “made a difference” not only to one fireservices agency, but more broadly to social equity, and we had arrived at a “mind frame”where we felt we had to act to foster change in this white-male-dominated industry. Wehas already identified that the area of “productive diversity” in the fire services wasgreen-field, with only one other Australian academic conducting studies in the area (inVictoria) and where we could be achieve high brand recognition, and attract competitivenational and industry funds.Consequently a decision was taken to focus energy and resources towards a “ProductiveDiversity in Fire Services RP” 2004-2007, and this program were launched via a highlysuccessful media campaign in late 2004 using the www.firegirls.info web survey as thevehicle for the launch, which occurred soon after the visit of Dr Dave Baigent, a leadingresearcher in this area in Europe and the UK.Our strategic decision to focus attention of “Productive Diversity in the Fire Services”had implications for funding, in that we no longer rely on funding from one fire servicealone (NSWFB) but are now in the process of attracting funds from government sources(eg government competitive and non-competitive grants, broad industry donations,consultancies). This shift on our access to funds is reflected in the table below, andreflects a deliberate strategy. We have a long history of successful funding applicationsand feel confident in our capacity to attract funds, particularly following our high profilefirst national Women in Firefighting Forum which has established us as national leadersin this research area.Finally, a decision was taken to begin to report insights about the fire services that hadbeen gleaned at the intersection of the discipline “sociology of work” (including “the 4
  5. 5. changing nature of work”) and “adult education” (including “critical thinking”). Thisstrategy was developed in order to place the “fire services” methodologically as a casestudy of social and pedagogical issues associated with the nexus of work and learningbetween a university and industry. The first refereed article in this series will bepublished shortly. 4. LEARNING, WORK AND ORGANIZATI ONS RESEARCH PROGRAMThis research program focuses on issues of lifelong learning at the intersection of highereducation, organisational development and employment. Researchers in this programexplore questions of organisational change, learning and development, access and equityand the role of partnerships in the co-production of knowledge. CLAST provides anumber of workbased degrees for industry partners and they form part of our researchinto learning and organisational change. ‘Workbased Learning’ is currently the subject ogMick Houlbrook’s PhD study, “Political Economy of Workbased Learning withinAustralian Universities”.Recognition of prior learning (RPL)There are two overlapping projects in this area, Research into philosophy and practices ofRPL in higher education and employment. Dr Merilyn Childs has investigated theaccessibility of RPL in Australian universities and Dr Regine Wagner is leading researchinto the recognition of qualifications, skills and experiences of skilled migrants andrefugees,Organisational ChangeDr Adrian Carr s was involved in a co-operative research venture with Centre forHospital Management and Information Systems Research at UNSW and the PrinceAlfred Hospital/Central Sydney Area Health Service. This venture had the title “A projectto measure and manage the psychological impact of reform on clinician managers asagents of organisational change” and involved a grant of $171, 294 (AUD). TheUniversity of New South Wales personnel that were involved in this project have nowmoved to Durham University in England where a similar project is now under way. Thisnew project also involves Dr Carr and the initial grant for this project is £1.3 million(BPS). 5
  6. 6. 5. CREATIVE EXPRESSI ONS RESEARCH PROGRAMThe Creative Expressions Research Program was formed in 2004 between academics andresearch students of the school in response to shared interested and a growing impetus forresearch opportunities from the graduates of the Master of Art Therapy.The Creative Expression Research Program provides a "home" for researchers interestedin the use of visual and other artistic expression as the mode for exploring, constructingand interpreting social change and social transformation. Researchers draw on a range ofartistic frameworks, and use artistic expression for different purposes: to exploreindigenous identities, to create narrative, as part of art therapy, in semiotic analysis, as aform of exegesis, to demonstrate alternate ways of understanding and expressing, insynaesthetic research and where a non-verbal, non-written form can express a meaningmore fully.There is an established research link between the University of London, GoldsmithsCollege Art Psychotherapy Unit, Dr Andrea Gilroy & University of Western Sydney,School of Applied Social & Human Sciences, Art/Expressive Therapies Programs, JillWestwood/Dr Adrian Carr. This collaboration has been supported by school IGS fundingand has generated the following:Dr Andrea Gilroy: Research Fellowship Nov/Dec 2003. Involvement in supporting thedevelopment of a research culture by input into PhD supervisory panels and jointdevelopment of proposed publications and recruitment of research students. 6. INCOME  The RTC developed a projected plan for expenditure of IGS and RTS (see Attachment 1). This plan is “on track”.  The RTC has income from a number of grantsResearch Grants Outcomes Partners2005 UWS Regional Wagner In progress Fairfield MigrantDevelopment grant. Piloting Resource Centre,RPL for skilled NESBmigrants$25,0002004-2006 APA (I) Linkages Wagner PhD Scholarship Association ofGrant Childrens Welfare 6
  7. 7. $85,000 Agencies2003 International Research Wagner Establishment of research SozialpädagogischesInitiatives Scheme UWS partnership Institut Berlin$68302002-03 Office of Regional Wagner In progress Association ofDevelopment, University of To date: three groups of Childrens WelfareWestern Sydney: Exploring managers established in AgenciesPaucity Management. Developing Campbelltown, Mt Druitt Centre for CommunityAction Learning networks with and St Mary’s. Welfare Traininglocal community services managers.$25,0002002-03 UWS Research Wagner Proposal to establish Skills Office of the DirectorPartnership Grant, Occupational and Experience and of Equal Opportunitymobility for skilled migrants and Development Unit for in Public Employmentrefugees. $40,000 skilled migrants and (ODEOPE) refugees at UWS. Report: So doctors become taxis drivers final draft stage)2002-03 Combined Pensioners Wagner Training Manual CPSAand Superannuant Association(CPSA) Review of theMedicine Information PersonsTraining$96802002 Department of Family Wagner 6 Scholarships for Association ofand Community Services, managers of community Childrens WelfareIntegrated Management and organisations in rural Agencies and CentreLeadership in Rural Community communities to enrol in for Community WelfareOrganisations, $ 30,000 the Graduate Diploma Training Social Sciences (Community Services – all Barnados-Mudgee graduated in 2003. Report: Wagner, R and Romic, M. (2003) The good, the bad and the invisible. Partnerships and collaborations between three sectors in Central Western New South Wales2005 Industry donations Childs First National Women in Fire Fighting$27,000 Firefighting Forum Organisations2004 International Research Childs Visiting Scholar, Dr Dave UWSInitiatives Scheme, Baigent, Fireworks, UKUWS$17,0002004 Industry grant Childs Developing a degree link NSW Firebrigads$25,000 program for the fire services2003 Industry grant Childs Towards a Research NSW Firebrigades 7
  8. 8. $120,000 Culture in the NSWFB2002 Industry grant Childs Towards a Research NSW Firebrigades$120,000 Culture in the NSWFB2002 UWS Research Grant Childs Evaluation of RPL UWSScheme information on Websites18,000 of Australian universities 7. RESEARCH TRAINING TRADITIONAL STRATEGYCurrently the following research students are supervised by members CLASTPhDs Masters (Hons) B (Hons) Lisa ArmitageMick Houlbrook Michael MorrisAnn Jensen Jo PiskSue Mlcek Phil ChambersLesley Hanney Clare DashJill Westwood Maggie WilsonCompletions in de reporting period(PhD)Lucy Crawford (GraduatedM(Hons)Margaret Bourne(Graduated)Marie Casamento,Claire Edwards, (Submitted)RESEARCH TRAINING PATHWAYIn additional to our traditional strategy, we have developed a Research Pathways TrainingScheme to actively encourage community services and emergency services professionalsto enter research training on the basis of high quality learning at and through work.  Our workbased degrees are a key part of our Research Training Pathways strategy by providing professionals with access to research training at the nexus of work and learning. The Graduate Diploma of Social Sciences (Community Services has successfully enrolled 45 FT students in 2003. The Graduate Certificate in Social 8
  9. 9. Sciences (Emergency Services) is in its first year, and will have enrolled 25 FT students in 2003.1, sponsored by the NSWFB. Plans are already in place to open this degree to the Rural Fire Services and other fire services organisations.  Our plan is to aim for 50% of each cohort (roughly 30 per annum) to enter a research-training pathway via Master of Social Sciences (coursework) and of these, to encourage 5% (4 per annum) to Masters (Honours) and PhD. We are sourcing scholarships and fee relief to support this strategy 8. DISSEMINATIONWEB PRESENCEDeveloped, see http://www.uws.edu.au/ashs/clast/Acknowledged and link at http://www.uws.edu.au/uws/research/units/ BOOKSCarr, A., & Hancock, P. (2003). Art and aesthetics at work. Hampshire, England: PalgravePress (Macmillan). ISBN: 0333 968638. PEER REVIEWED JOURNA L ARTICLESCarr, A., & Hancock, P. (Eds.) (2002). Art and aesthetics in organisation studies. Guesteditors of a special edition of the Journal of Critical Postmodern Organisation Science(TAMARA), 2 (1), 1-105.Carr, A., & Hancock, P. (2002). Art and aesthetics at work: An overview. Journal ofCritical Postmodern Organisation Science (TAMARA), 2 (1), 1-7.Carr, A. (2002). Art as a form of knowledge: The implications for critical management.Journal of Critical Postmodern Organisation Science (TAMARA), 2 (1), 8-30.Carr, A. (2002). Jung, archetypes and mirroring in organizational change management:Lessons from a longitudinal case study. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 15(5), 477-489. 9
  10. 10. Carr, A. (2002). Managing in a psychoanalytically informed manner. Guest editor ofspecial edition of Journal of Managerial Psychology, 17 (5), 338-434.Carr, A. (2002). Managing in a psychoanalytically informed manner: On overview.Journal of Managerial Psychology, 17 (5), 343-347.Carr, A. (2002). Organisation culture: Organisation change. Journal of OrganizationalChange Management, 15 (4) 425-432.Carr, A. (2002). The bewildering collection of ‘bric-a-brac’ called organisationaldiscourse: ‘Whence and when cometh the phoenix?’. Journal of Management Systems, 14(4), 61-81.Carr, A. (2003). The ‘separation thesis’ of self and other: Metatheorizing a dialecticalternative. Theory & Psychology, 13 (1), 117-138.Carr, A. (2003). Organisational discourse as a creative space for play: The potential ofpostmodernist and surrealist forms of play. Human Resource Development International, 6(2), 197-217.Carr, A. (2003). The Prosecutorial State: A response to Foxs "Big Brother" scenario.Administrative Theory & Praxis 22 (5), 81-90.Carr, A. (2003). Rethinking educational administration: Going beyond the paradigmdebate and considering educational administration as a moral art. Journal of ManagementSystems, 21 (3).Carr, A. (2003). The psychodynamic conception of the death instinct and its relevance toorganisations. Journal of Psycho-Social Studies, 2 (1), 1-15. Retrieved March 27, 2003, fromhttp://www.btinternet.com/~psycho_social/http://www.btinternet.com/~psycho_social/Vol2/JPSS2-AC3.htmlCarr, A., & Downs, A. (2004). Transitional and quasi-objects in organization studies:Viewing Enron from the object relations world of Winnicott and Serres. Journal ofOrganizational Change Management, 17(4), 352-364.Carr, A. (2004). Management as a moral art: Emerging from the paradigm debate.Philosophy of Management, 4 (3), 47-62.Carr, A., Downs, A., & Durant, R. (2004). Emergent strategy development, abduction,and pragmatism: New lessons for corporations. Human Systems Management, 23 (2), 79-91. 10
  11. 11. Carr, A., & Downs, A. (2005). ERON: Taking our cue from the world of object relations.Special Issue of Journal of Critical Postmodern Organisation Science (TAMARA), 3 (2), 1-15.Carr, A. (2005). The challenge of critical theory for those in organization theory andbehaviour: An overview. Accepted commissioned paper with peer review for a specialissue of the International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior on the topic of criticaltheory, organization theory and behavior, A. Sementelli (Special issue editor).Childs M., Morris M., and Ingham V. (2004). “The rise and rise of clean, white collar (firefighting)work”. Disaster Prevention and Management: an International Journal, 13, 409-414.Childs, M. (2002). “Improving the quality of non-emergency leadership: a casestudy”, DisasterPrevention and Management: an International Journal, 11, 102-108.Childs, M. (2002). Improving the quality of non-emergency leadership: a case study. Disaster Preventionand Management, Vol 11, No.2, 2002, pp.102-108.Childs M. (accepted Wed 2/9/2004) “Beyond training: new firefighters and critical reflection.”Disaster Prevention and Management: an International Journal.Childs, M (in progress). Towards Strategic Research Priorities in Fire Services in NSW. AustralianJournal of Emergency Management.Childs M. (submitted). “Productive diversity in the Australian Fire Services”, Journal of EmergencyManagement Australia, February 2005.Childs, M. (submitted). “Not through women’s eyes. The social construction of a gendered tsunamidisaster”, Disaster Prevention and Management: an International Journal, 23rd April, 2005.Degeling, P., & Carr, A. (2004). Leadership for the systemization of health care: Theunaddressed issue in health care reform. Journal of Health Organization and Management,18 (6), 399-414.Downs, A., Durant, R., & Carr, A. (2002). Emergent strategy development for organizations". In K.Richardson (Ed.), Proceeding of the conference on Managing the Complex, The Institute for the Studyof Coherence and Emergence, MA: USA. [Published on the World Wide Web:http://isce.edu/site/Agenda.html,http://www.isce.edu/site/Downs_Durant_Carr.pdfDowns, A., & Carr, A. (2004). Abjection, globalization, ethics and organizationaldynamics: Lessons from ‘The Sopranos’. Journal of Psycho-Social Studies, 3 (2), 1-17.Retrieved July 7, 2004, fromhttp://www.btinternet.com/~psycho_social/http://www.btinternet.com/~psycho_social/Vol5/V5.htmlGabriel, Y., & Carr, A. (2002). A history of approaches to managing in a psychoanalytically informedmanner. Journal of Managerial Psychology, 17 (5), 348-365.Lowe, S., Carr, A., & Thomas, M. (2004). Paradigmapping marketing theory. EuropeanJournal of Marketing Theory, 38 (9/10), 1057-1065. 11
  12. 12. Lowe, S., Carr, A., Thomas, M., & Watkins-Mathys, L. (2005). The fourth hermeneutic inmarketing theory. Journal of Marketing Theory, 5 (2), 185-203.Wagner, R., Childs, M. and Houlbrook, M. (2002) Work-based learning as critical social pedagogy.Adult Learning Australia, 41(3), 314-334Wagner,R. and Spence,N., (2003). In times of shrinking resources: Paucity management practices inAustralian nonprofit human services organisations. Journal for Nonprofit Management 7(1) 44-56Wagner, R. and Spence, N., (2003). Paucity Management: How do non-profit human serviceorganisations manage to survive? Third Sector Review, 9 (1)119-137 PEER REVIEWED CONFER ENCE PAPERSCarr, A. (2002). Lost-and-found: Using metaphor in organisation studies. Paperpresented to The International Academy of Business Disciplines Fourteenth AnnualConference, Merina del Rey, Los Angeles, April 4-7th, 2002.Carr, A. (2002). Organisation studies turning from the dark side: Moving from scientismto the embrace of hermeneutics. Paper presented to The International Academy of BusinessDisciplines Fourteenth Annual Conference, Merina del Rey, Los Angeles, April 4-7th, 2002.Carr, A. (2002). The embrace of hermeneutics: The implications for organisation studiesand public administration. Paper presented to The Fifteenth Symposium On PublicAdministration Theory, Cleveland, Ohio, May 30th - June 1st, 2002.Carr, A. (2002). Management as a moral art: Emerging from the paradigm debate. Paperpresented to The Philosophy of Management Conference, St Annes College, Oxford, June 26-29th, 2002. [See #C75 of the publication list below]Carr, A. (2002). The modernist preoccupation with speed: A psychoanalytic and criticalreading. The 20th Anniversary Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism, Budapest,Hungary, July 10-13th, 2002.Carr, A. (2003). Thanatos and the organisation: Preliminary thoughts on thepsychodynamic conception of the death instinct and its relevance to organisations". TheInternational Academy of Business Disciplines Fifteenth Annual Conference, Orlando, Florida,April 3-6th, 2003.Carr, A., & Downs, A. (2003). Quasi-objects & Eron". The International Academy ofBusiness Disciplines Fifteenth Annual Conference, Orlando, Florida, April 3-6th, 2003.Carr, A., Degeling, P., Winters, M., & Kennedy, J. (2003). Understanding thepsychodynamics of culture and the psychological contract in a period of organization 12
  13. 13. change: Results from an empirical study. 11th European Congress on Work andOrganizational Psychology, Lisbon, Portugal, 14-17th May 2003.Carr, A., Lowe, S., Thomas, M., & Watkins-Mathys, L. (2003). Paradigmapping:Marketing as a potential moral art. Annual conference of the Administrative SciencesAssociation of Canada (ASAC), Halifax, Nova Scotia, June 14-17th, 2003.Carr, A., & Lowe, S. (2003). Polytropy, Zeitgeist and metaphors: Re-exploring, andhandling with care, the use of metaphor in organisation studies. The 19th Colloquium ofthe European Group for Organizational Studies, Copenhagen, July 3-5th, 2003.Carr, A. (2003). The construction of identity and selfhood: Glimpses of the relevance ofthese psychodynamics to work organisations. 3rd International Critical ManagementConference, Lancaster University, England, July 7-9th, 2003.Carr, A. (2003). The psychodynamic conception of the death instinct and its relevance toorganisations. The 21st Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism - Organizationalwellness: mens sana in corprate sano?, University of Cambridge, July 9-12th, 2003.Carr, A., Degeling, P., Winters, M., & Kennedy, J. (2003). Physician heal thyself: Theresults of an empirical study into stress amongst medical clinicians and otheroccupational subgroups during a period of organization change in a hospital system".The 21st Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism - Organizational wellness: menssana in corprate sano?, University of Cambridge, July 9-12th, 2003.Carr, A. (2004). What it means to be ‘Critical’: A case of the appropriate conceptual lens.Workshop: Critical Perspectives on International Business, Durham Business School, April5& 6th, 2004.Carr, A. (2004). The embrace of hermeneutics: Implications for organization andmanagement studies. The 21st Annual Association of Management Conference, Norfolk,Virginia, April 15-18th, 2004.Carr, A. (2004). Lessons for organization studies and management from the realm ofart”. The 21st Annual Association of Management Conference, Norfolk, Virginia, April 15-18th, 2004.Carr, A., & Downs, A. (2004). Ambivalence, abjection and organizational discourse: Theinvisible hand of the repressed”. The 6th International Conference on OrganizationalDiscourse: “Artefacts, Archetypes and Architexts”, Amsterdam, July 28-30th, 2004.Carr, A. (2004). Art as ‘The Great Refusal’: Lessons for organization studies andmanagement. The Second Art of Management and Organisation Conference, Paris, September7-10th, 2004. 13
  14. 14. Carr, A., & Lapp, C. (2005). Holding patterns: A psychodynamic review of the deathinstinct in organizational change. The Western Decision Science Institute, 34th AnnualMeeting, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, March 22-26th, 2005Carr, A., & Lapp, C. (2005). Nothing ventured, nothing gained: The psychodynamics ofthe death instinct’s influence on organizational conflict management. Paper presentedto the Northeast Decision Science Institute, 2005 Annual Meeting, Philadelphia,Pennsylvania, March 30th – April 1st 2005.Carr, A., & Lapp, C. (2005). A case of ‘acting out the missing leader’: Understandingaspects of the psychodynamics of group identity. the Standing Conference for Management& Organization Inquiry (ScMoi), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 7-9th, 2005.Chambers, P. (2003) Educator Jones and the search for ‘creds’: searching for credibility in workplaceeducation; Emergency Management Australia conference, August, 2003, Canberra,Childs M. (Accepted 24/11/2004). Imagining the (almost) Impossible: Female, Indigenous andEthnic Firefighters in the Australian Fire Services. The Fifth International Conference on Diversty inCommunities, Organizations and Nations, Beijing 30 June- 3rd July, 2005.Childs M. (2004). Struggling with terrorism- the sting in the tail of socially engaged pedagogy,Education and Social Action Conference. 6th-8th December, (Centre for Popular Education, University ofTechnology, Sydney. ISBN 1 86365 298 1, pp.441-445.Childs, M (paper accepted). Building Sustainable Research Partnerships in the fire services in NSWSafer Sustainable Communities, 2003 Australian Disaster Conference, National Convention Centre, Canberra,10 - 12 September 2003Childs, M and Wagner, R (paper accepted). More Than Putting Out Fires: The Changing Nature ofCareer Fire Fighter’s Work in a Western Urban Environment, 36th World Congress, International Instituteof Sociology, Social Change in the Age of Globalisation, Sociology of Disaster Stream, July, 2003.Childs M. (Accepted 24/11/2004). Imagining the (almost) Impossible: Female, Indigenous andEthnic Firefighters in the Australian Fire Services. The Fifth International Conference on Diversty inCommunities, Organizations and Nations, Beijing 30 June- 3rd July, 2005.Childs M. (2004). Struggling with terrorism- the sting in the tail of socially engaged pedagogy,Education and Social Action Conference. 6th-8th December, (Centre for Popular Education, University ofTechnology, Sydney. ISBN 1 86365 298 1, pp.441-445.Downs, A., Durant, R., & Carr, A. (2002). Emergent strategy development fororganizations. Managing the Complex Conference, Fort Myers, Florida, 7-10th December2002.Downs, A., & Carr, A. (2003). Doing a Boje: Using dramaturgical analysis in criticalmanagement studies. 3rd International Critical Management Conference, LancasterUniversity, England, July 7-9th, 2003. 14
  15. 15. Downs, A., & Carr, A. (2004). Abjection, Globalisation, Ethics and organisationaldynamics: Lessons from The Sopranos. The International Academy of Business DisciplinesSixteenth Annual Conference, San Antonio, Texas, March 25-28th, 2004.Houlbrook. M and Wagner. R. 2004. Learning Contracts as Dangerous Practice? Proceedings of the 12thAnnual International Conference on Post-compulsory Education and Training, Surfers paradise, Gold CoastQueensland 6-8 December, 2004. Brisbane: Australian Academic Press 230-237Lowe, S. & Carr, A. (2003). Paradigmapping and management as a moral art: Clearing apath through the incommensurability debate in organisation and management studies.The International Academy of Business Disciplines Fifteenth Annual Conference, Orlando,Florida, April 3-6th, 2003.Lowe, S., & Carr, A. (2003). Being/Well. The 21st Standing Conference on OrganizationalSymbolism - Organizational wellness: mens sana in corprate sano?, University ofCambridge, July 9-12th, 2003.Lowe, S., Carr, A., & Watkins-Mathys, L. (2003). Gurus, knowledge, self andorganization. The 17th Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management Conference,Fremantle, Australia, December 2-5th, 2003.Lowe, S., & Carr, A. (2004). Comparative architextures and organizational discourseanalysis: Some reflections. The 6th International Conference on Organizational Discourse:“Artefacts, Archetypes and Architexts”, Amsterdam, July 28-30th, 2004.Wagner, R. and Mlcek, S. (2004) Partnerhips and collaborations as Paucity ManagementPractice in Australian Community Based Human Service Organizations. 6th InternationalConference of the International Society for Third Sector Research. July, 2004Wagner,R., Childs, M. and Constable,J. (2003) Oh Lucky Country – Barriers to labourmarket integration of skilled migrants and refugees in Australia. 36th World CongressInstitute of Sociology, Beijing, postponed to 7-11 July, 2004 due to SARS.Wagner, R and Spence, N. (2002) Organisational Practices in Paucity Management. Anenquiry into good management practice in non-profit human service organisations inAustralia. The Sixth International Research Symposium on Public Management 8-10 AprilWagner, R., Mlcek, S. and Spence, N. (2004) Fostering Integrated Community Leadership in Regionaland Rural New South Wales. 1st National AUCEA Conference. Bathurst 14-16 JulyWhitty, M., & Carr, A. (2004). Breaking the rules: applying Klein’s work to understandcyber-cheating. The 51st Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society, Liverpool,September 1-3rd, 2004. REPORTS 15
  16. 16. Chambers, P. & Evans R. (2003) Report on the first round of New South Wales Fire Brigades StationOfficers Promotional Programme July 2002 to June 2003.Childs, M. and Ingham, V. (2002). [From Senior Fire Fighter to Station Officer-What does it take? A career development resource.] Research Centre for Learning and SocialTransformation: Penrith, pp.1-21.Childs, M and Ingham, V. (2002). [The Professional Development of SeniorFire Fighters Seeking Promotion to Station Officer in the New South Wales Fire Brigades], ResearchCentre for Learning and Social Transformation: Penrith, pp.1-28.Wagner, R. (ed) 2003) Recognition of prior learning in higher education and the Australian labourmarket. The case of skilled migrants and refugees. UWS report, ISBN 1863418245Wagner, R. and Spence, N. (2002) Organisational Practices in Paucity Management. An enquiry intogood management practice in non-profit human service organisations in Australia.http://www.ems.ed.ac.uk/irspmvi/papers/index.htmlWagner, R., Romic, M. (2003) The good the bad and the invisible: partnerships and collaborationsbetween three sector in the Central Western New South Wales. UWS/ACWA, ISBN 1 86341 8237 AWARDSChilds, M. 2005. Edna Ryan Award for services to women doing firefighting work. WEA, Sydney.Carr, A. 2002, 2003, 2004. MCB University Press/Emerald publishing Award for Excellence inresearch for papers by the Editor and the Editorial team of a journal for the most "OutstandingPaper" in the volume for that year.Fire Services Research Team (CLAST). 2004. UWS VC’s Excellence Award Highly Commended(Industry and Community Partnerships).Wagner, R.. (2003) UWS Vice Chancellor’s Excellence Award Highly Commended (Regional andCommunity Engagement). KEY NOTE ADDRESSESChilds, M. 2005. “It’s time for productive diversity in the Australian fore services; or why there was aneed for a National Women in Firefighting Forum”, Key note address National Women in FirefightingForum, Sydney Airport Hotel, May 12-13th 2005.Childs, M. 2003. Building sustainable research partnerships in the fire services in NSW” SaferSustainable Communities, EMA Australian Disaster Conference, National convention Centre, Canberra,101-12 the September. 16
  17. 17. BOOK CHAPTERSCarr, A. (2002). Lost-and-found: Using metaphor in organisation studies. In J. Biberman& A. Alkhafaji (Eds.), Business research yearbook: Global business perspectives (Vol. 9, pp.519-523). Michigan: McNaughton & Gunn Inc. ISBN: 1-889754-06-4.Carr, A. (2002). Organisation studies turning from the dark side: Moving from scientismto the embrace of hermeneutics. In J. Biberman & A. Alkhafaji (Eds.), Business researchyearbook: Global business perspectives (Vol. 9, pp. 534-538). Michigan: McNaughton &Gunn Inc. ISBN: 1-889754-06-4.Carr, A., & Hancock, P. (2003). Preface: Art and aesthetics at work. In Carr, A., &Hancock, P. (Eds.), Art and aesthetics at work (pp. viii-xi). Hampshire, England: Palgrave.Carr, A., & Hancock, P. (2003). Art and aesthetics as a way of knowing organization. InCarr, A., & Hancock, P. (Eds.), Art and aesthetics at work (pp. 3-6). Hampshire, England:Palgrave.Carr, A. (2003). Art as a form of knowledge: The implications for critical management. InCarr, A., & Hancock, P. (Eds.), Art and aesthetics at work (pp. 7-37). Hampshire, England:Palgrave.Carr, A. (2003). Thanatos: The psychodynamic conception of the death instinct and itsrelevance to organizations. In J. Biberman & A. Alkhafaji (Eds.), Business researchyearbook: Global business perspectives (Vol. 10, pp. 803-807). Michigan: McNaughton &Gunn. ISBN 1-889754-07-2.Carr, A., & Downs, A. (2003). Transitional and quasi-objects in organization studies. In J.Biberman & A. Alkhafaji (Eds.), Business research yearbook: Global business perspectives(Vol. 10, pp. 823-827). Michigan: McNaughton & Gunn. ISBN 1-889754-07-2.Downs, A., & Carr, A. (2004). Abjection, Globalisation, Ethics and organisationaldynamics: Lessons from The Sopranos. In C. Gardner, J. Biberman & A. Alkhafaji (Eds.),Business research yearbook: Global business perspectives (Vol. 11, pp. 781-784). Michigan:McNaughton & Gunn. ISBN 1-889754-08-0.Durant, R., Downs, A., & Carr, A. (2004). Emergent strategy development, abduction,and pragmatism: New lessons for corporations. In C. Gardner, J. Biberman & A.Alkhafaji (Eds.), Business research yearbook: Global business perspectives (Vol. 11, 795-799).Michigan: McNaughton & Gunn. ISBN 1-889754-08-0.Hancock, P., & Carr, A. (2003). Work as an aesthetically ordered activity. In Carr, A., &Hancock, P. (Eds.), Art and aesthetics at work (pp. 67-69). Hampshire, England: Palgrave. 17
  18. 18. Hancock, P., & Carr, A. (2003). Aesthetics and the hierarchical ordering of inter-personaland institutional power relations. In Carr, A., & Hancock, P. (Eds.), Art and aesthetics atwork (pp. 135-137). Hampshire, England: Palgrave.Lowe, S. & Carr, A. (2003). Paradigmapping and management as a moral art: Clearing apath through the incommensurability debate in organisation and management studies.In J. Biberman & A. Alkhafaji (Eds.), Business research yearbook: Global business perspectives(Vol. 10, pp. 778-782). Michigan: McNaughton & Gunn. ISBN 1-889754-07-2.Wagner. R., Childs. M. & Constable. J. (2004). Oh lucky country, non-english-speaking backgroundskilled migrants and refugees and the Australian Labour Market. In Leonard. R. (Ed.) A fair go, domeissues of social justice in Australia, Common Ground (pp 147-156). Alton Vic. MEDIA COVERAGEWagner, R. ‘So Doctors become Taxi Drivers’ UWS Forum on Skills Recognition for SkilledMigrants and Refugees, February 2004 5 pm News Bulletin (Writer), & SBS (Director) (2004). UWS research launched today into problems facing skilled migrants and refugees [Radio]. In S. Radio (Producer), SBS News. Sydney: SBS. 7 Oclock News (Writer) (2004). Unit to test the skills of new migrants [Radio]. In C. News (Producer), ABC 666 7am News. Canberra: ABC. BERNAMA (Writer) (2004). Your taxi driver could be a doctor or engineer [Newspaper]. In BERNAMA (Producer), Malaysia General News. Malaysia: Malaysian National News Agency. Catterns, A. (Writer), & D. Drew (Director) (2004). Study to test the skills of new migrants [Radio]. In D. Drew (Producer), Breakfast, ABC 702 Sydney. Sydney: ABC Radio. Daily Telegraph. (2004, 27th February). Putting Skills back to work. Daily Telegraph,. Davey, C., & Dyett, G. (Writer), & D. Willman (Director) (2004). UWS Helping skilled migrants and refugees find work in Australia. [Television]. In SBS (Producer), World View, SBS Ethnic Radio (Melbourne). Melbourne: SBS. Devai, V. (2004, 26th February). Fed: UWS to set up Australias first skilled migrant program. AAP Newsfeed. Devai, V. (2004, 27th February). Uni to set up the nations first skilled migrant program. General News. Enus, A., & Sarumpaet, R. (Writer), & B. Thomson (Director) (2004). World News Tonight [Radio]. In B. Thomson (Producer), SBS World News Tonight. Sydney: SBS. 18
  19. 19. Higher Education Supplement. (2004, 3rd March). Employing migrants abilities. TheAustralian, p. 30.Kostakidis, M. (Writer), & M. Boyd (Director) (2004). SBS World News [Television]. In M.Monitors (Producer), SBS World News. Sydney: SBS.McCrossin, J. (Writer) (2004). Skilled Migrant experiences [Radio]. In K. Gollan (Producer),Life Matters. Sydney: ABC.Newsreader (Writer), & M. Bass (Director) (2004). Unit for the skills and qualifications of newmigrants in Australia [Radio]. In ABC (Producer), News 7:45 am. Melbourne: ABC 774Melbourne.Westwood, J. 7 Aug 2003 ABC TV, Compass, Healing the Soul. 19
  20. 20. A T TA C H M E N T 1 P L A N N E D E X P E N D I T U R E I G S , RT S A N D R I B G RTC L E A R N I N G A N D S OC I A L T R A N S F O R M A T I ONBudget source 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006IGS 011 1 2 2 continuing Unclear dueScholarships to College restructureIGS 010 Replace Lap top (Phd Lap top Income to Unclear dueResearch Mac in AE103 student, (Phd to CollegeInfrastructure $4,000 Research student) S JSC restructure Serv.) $4,000 $4,000 Audio equipment $500IGS 015 Industry RA Level 5/5 RA Level 5/5 RA Level Income to Unclear duelinkages 1 day per week 1 day per 5/5 SJSC to College x 26 weeks week x 48 1 day per restructure (approx $6,000) weeks (approx week x 48 $12,000) weeks (approx $12,000)RTS 401 RA Level 5/5 RA Level 5/5 RA Level Income to Unclear dueStrong Research 1 day per week 1 day per 5/5 SASHS to CollegeCulture x 26 weeks week x 48 1 day per restructure (approx $6,000) weeks (approx week x 48 $12,000) weeks (approx $12,000)RIBG 14hrs/week, Unclear due 48 weeks at to College HEW level restructure 5/5 including on-cost and loading 20

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