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M8 technology timeline

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M8 technology timeline

  1. 1. In 1830 The dark chambers before we had cameras. There was the camera obsura. this camera you had to take picture in complete darkness to capture the image ‘ http://chestofbo oks.com/referen ce/American- Cyclopaedia- 2/images/Came ra-Obscura.jpg
  2. 2. 1837 was the next inventions of the Daguerreotype according to history he as the first inventor of the practical process of photo by: keystone-france/hulton archives/getty images
  3. 3. 1840-1847 was the Calotype, he used the previous process to perfect his way of taking pictures. According to history Around the same time that “Daguerreotypomania” was taking hold, the British inventor William Henry Fox Talbot unveiled his own photographic process called the “Calotype.” This method traded the Daguerreotype’s metal plates for sheets of high-quality photosensitive paper. Information from http://www.history.com/news/history- lists/8-crucial-innovations-in-the-invention-of-photography
  4. 4. 1851 the Wet-Collodion Process  Since Daguerreotype and Calotype inventions where both not recorizned ther was yet another person that came up with another way of taking picture .  Frederick Scott Archer pioneered a new photographic method that combined crisp image quality with negatives that could be easily copied. Archer’s secret was a chemical called collodion, a medical dressing that also proved highly effective as a means for coating light-sensitive solutions onto glass plates. While these “wet plates” reduced exposure times to only a few seconds, usin them was often quite the chore.
  5. 5. 1871-1878 the inventions of dry plates, research found that for most of the 1800s, the panoply of noxious solutions and mixtures involved in using a camera made photography difficult for anyone without a working knowledge of chemistry, finally changed in the 1870s, when Robert L. Maddox and others perfected a new type of photographic plate that preserved silver salts in gelatin. Since they retained their light-sensitivity for long periods of time, these “dry” plates could be prepackaged and mass-produced, freeing photographers from the annoying task of prepping and developing their own wet plates on the fly http://www.ohs58.net/000/6/9/9/9996/yearbook/Robert-Maddox- Teacher-1958-Odessa-High-School-Odessa-Texas-Odessa-TX.jpg DryPlates
  6. 6. 1884-1889 Flexible Roll Film:  Photography didn’t truly become accessible to amateurs until the mid- 1880s, when inventor George Eastman began producing film on rolls. Film was more lightweight and resilient than clunky glass plates, and the use of a roll allowed photographers to take multiple pictures in quick succession. In 1888, Eastman used flexible film as the primary selling point of his first Kodak camera, a small, 100-exposure model that customers could use and then send back to the manufacturer to have their photos developed  Eastman’s camera was remarkably easy to use—he marketed it to Victorian shutterbugs under the slogan “You press the button, we do the rest”—but its coated paper film produced fairly low quality photos
  7. 7. 1907 Autochrome  the French brothers Louis and Auguste Lumière—perhaps better known as early pioneers of cinema—began marketing an additive color process they dubbed “Autochrome.” The Lumieres found the key to their invention in a most unlikely place: the potato. By adding tiny grains of dyed potato starch to a panchromatic emulsion, they were able to produce vivid, painterly images that put all past attempts at color to shame.  Autochrome would reign as the world’s most popular color film technique until 1935, when a more sophisticated color process arrived in the form of the Eastman Kodak Company’s legendary Kodachrome film.
  8. 8. 1974 this first Digital Camera  By the 1990’s we where in the age of technology article written by Samidha Verma  modern day cameras have long history that goes back far in time. Cameras have witnessed many phases of evolution – camera obscura, daguerreotypes, dry plates, calotypes, film to SLRs and DSLRs.  http://www.engineersgarage.com/invention-stories/camera- history
  9. 9. Source cited  http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/8-crucial-innovations-in-the-invention-of- photography  http://www.engineersgarage.com/invention-stories/camera-history

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