What is a drug?“A substance people take to change the waythey feel, think or behave.” It could be: a controlled drug, e.g...
Drugs – do we need to worry?Amid media stories about young people drinkingtoo much and experimenting with riskysubstances,...
Smoking, drinking and drug use falling Trends among 14 year olds over the past decade. 40%                                ...
But many young people are still risking  their health and future wellbeing Around one in seven 13 year olds say they  hav...
Questions for governors: 1 How does your PSHE provision match up to Ofsted’s standards? Are pupils learning how tomake goo...
Questions for governors: 2  Are drug-related incidents  managed with confidence  and consistency, and in the    best inter...
Questions for governors: 3 What arrangements are there to identify and safeguard the wellbeing of pupils who need help bec...
The answers to these questions will             help you… fulfil the school’s statutory duty to promote  pupils’ wellbein...
A reminder on how Ofsted determines           schools’ effectiveness:   achievement of pupils   quality of teaching   b...
Behaviour and safety of pupils Inspectors take into account a range of  evidence, rather than simply observations. This ...
Spiritual, moral, social and cultural                developmentExamples given as evidence of pupils’spiritual, moral, soc...
Answering the first question How does your PSHE provision match up to Ofsted’s standards?  Are pupils learning how to make...
PSHE (Personal, Social, Health and         Economic) education In enabling children and young people to  understand risks...
What do Ofsted look for in PSHE? Ofsted has criteria for its subject-specific  inspections which set out what it expects ...
In around a quarter of schools “teachers lackedthe necessary expertise to engage pupils and tochallenge their misconceptio...
What Ofsted look for in PSHE     inspections (in the classroom)* Teachers are skilled in discussing sensitive and  contro...
What Ofsted look for in PSHE       inspections (in planning)* PSHE is well resourced in terms of curriculum  time, staff ...
‘Current best practice’ in drug               education The basics: enough curriculum time; skilled  teachers; lessons ba...
Answering the second question    Are drug-related incidents    managed with confidence    and consistency, and in the     ...
Dealing with ‘Drug-related incidents’:            What are they? A ‘drug-related incident’ could involve finding  an unau...
How much of a problem is it for us? In some settings for older pupils, especially  Pupil Referral Units and colleges, dru...
 Even primary schools may have problems.  Recent surveys in some primary schools have  revealed behaviour is being affect...
Answering the third question   What arrangements are there   to identify and safeguard the   wellbeing of pupils who need ...
Identifying pupils’ needs and supporting    them with drug and alcohol issues These needs may be identified in response t...
Bringing all these together:         the school drug policyThis should set out: How the school manages drug-related  inci...
The school’s drug policy should include: Arrangements for ensuring that governors are  well informed on drugs issues as t...
Reviewing the school drug policy It should be agreed in consultation with the whole  school community including pupils, p...
Key questionsto ask in your          What are we doing to    school              promote health and                       ...
To find out more...   www.mentoruk.org.uk/resources/schoolsGovernors can find: advice on best practice in drug education...
School governors presentation - drugs and alcohol
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School governors presentation - drugs and alcohol

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School governors help shape the strategies that schools use to try and prevent drug and alcohol use by their pupils and in supporting and putting boundaries around those young people who get into trouble with substance misuse. This presentation sets out how governors can improve the response of their school to these issues and how they can use that process to explain to Ofsted how they are helping their pupils to stay safe.

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School governors presentation - drugs and alcohol

  1. 1. What is a drug?“A substance people take to change the waythey feel, think or behave.” It could be: a controlled drug, e.g. cannabis alcohol tobacco prescription and over-the-counter medicines volatile substances, e.g. sniffing glue, aerosols or petrol
  2. 2. Drugs – do we need to worry?Amid media stories about young people drinkingtoo much and experimenting with riskysubstances, it is easy to miss the actual trends...
  3. 3. Smoking, drinking and drug use falling Trends among 14 year olds over the past decade. 40% Ever taken 30% drugs 20% Drank alcohol in the past 10% week 0% Regular smokerSmoking, drinking and drug use among young people in 2011, Office for National Statistics
  4. 4. But many young people are still risking their health and future wellbeing Around one in seven 13 year olds say they have been drunk at least twice.1 11% of 15-16 year olds surveyed said they had had unprotected sex after drinking.2 19% of 15 year olds smoked cannabis in the past year and 5% took a Class A drug.3 1. WHO (2012) Health behaviours in school-aged children 2. ESPAD (2009) The 2007 ESPAD report 3. Fuller, E. (2012) Smoking, drinking and drug use
  5. 5. Questions for governors: 1 How does your PSHE provision match up to Ofsted’s standards? Are pupils learning how tomake good decisions whenfaced with risky situations?
  6. 6. Questions for governors: 2 Are drug-related incidents managed with confidence and consistency, and in the best interests of those involved?
  7. 7. Questions for governors: 3 What arrangements are there to identify and safeguard the wellbeing of pupils who need help because of their own, or someone else’s, drug and alcohol use?
  8. 8. The answers to these questions will help you… fulfil the school’s statutory duty to promote pupils’ wellbeing demonstrate to Ofsted that the behaviour and safety of pupils is ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ demonstrate to Ofsted the contribution that PSHE education makes to pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development
  9. 9. A reminder on how Ofsted determines schools’ effectiveness: achievement of pupils quality of teaching behaviour and safety quality of leadership and managementInspectors must also consider: pupils’ spiritual, moral, social and cultural development the extent to which the education provided meets the needs of the range of pupils at the school
  10. 10. Behaviour and safety of pupils Inspectors take into account a range of evidence, rather than simply observations. This includes the extent to which pupils are able to understand and respond to risk, including risks associated with substance misuse.* *School inspection handbook, September 2012
  11. 11. Spiritual, moral, social and cultural developmentExamples given as evidence of pupils’spiritual, moral, social and cultural developmentinclude where pupils… “are reflective about beliefs, values and more profound aspects of human experience” “develop and apply an understanding of right and wrong in their school life and life outside school” “take part in a range of activities requiring social skills”
  12. 12. Answering the first question How does your PSHE provision match up to Ofsted’s standards? Are pupils learning how to make good decisions when faced with risky situations?
  13. 13. PSHE (Personal, Social, Health and Economic) education In enabling children and young people to understand risks, PSHE can contribute to their behaviour and safety. By developing life skills and helping young people think about their own and other people’s values and attitudes, for example to drugs, it can enhance their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development .
  14. 14. What do Ofsted look for in PSHE? Ofsted has criteria for its subject-specific inspections which set out what it expects to see in PSHE. The last time it carried out a survey of PSHE, the results were mixed:
  15. 15. In around a quarter of schools “teachers lackedthe necessary expertise to engage pupils and tochallenge their misconceptions”In many schools, “students’ knowledge aboutthe social risks and physical effects of excessivealcohol consumption was rudimentary.”
  16. 16. What Ofsted look for in PSHE inspections (in the classroom)* Teachers are skilled in discussing sensitive and controversial issues. Lessons use a wide range of strategies and active participation and effective discussion are a strong feature. Pupils have a strong understanding of key issues and how to keep themselves safe. PSHE develops personal skills, including critical thinking. *themes drawn from subject-specific guidance for inspectors
  17. 17. What Ofsted look for in PSHE inspections (in planning)* PSHE is well resourced in terms of curriculum time, staff training, management time and the use of external services and materials. It is informed by current best practice. Pupils and teachers are engaged in evaluating and influencing the curriculum. Local data is taken into account. It is supported by links with partner schools, parents, carers and external agencies *themes drawn from subject-specific guidance for inspectors
  18. 18. ‘Current best practice’ in drug education The basics: enough curriculum time; skilled teachers; lessons based on assessment of pupils’ needs; interactive learning. Scare tactics or ‘information only’ don’t work. Developing life skills and allowing pupils to practise them through interactive teaching.
  19. 19. Answering the second question Are drug-related incidents managed with confidence and consistency, and in the best interests of those involved?
  20. 20. Dealing with ‘Drug-related incidents’: What are they? A ‘drug-related incident’ could involve finding an unauthorised drug at school, use on school premises or on a school trip, or concerns raised about misuse outside school. Misuse may be by a pupil, but may also be by parents or school staff.
  21. 21. How much of a problem is it for us? In some settings for older pupils, especially Pupil Referral Units and colleges, drug misuse is a daily challenge Ofsted has suggested that in most secondary schools there are drug-related incidents at least once a term. *Ofsted (2005) Managing challenging behaviour
  22. 22.  Even primary schools may have problems. Recent surveys in some primary schools have revealed behaviour is being affected by use of high-caffeine energy drinks.* Drug and alcohol abuse in families may also have a significant impact on pupils wellbeing. It is important to have an accurate picture for your school. *Nottingham D-vibe survey
  23. 23. Answering the third question What arrangements are there to identify and safeguard the wellbeing of pupils who need help because of their own, or someone else’s, drug and alcohol use?
  24. 24. Identifying pupils’ needs and supporting them with drug and alcohol issues These needs may be identified in response to a breach of the school rules Pupils may also disclose problems to a member of staff Do pupils know how they can access confidential advice? Does the school have a policy on young carers?
  25. 25. Bringing all these together: the school drug policyThis should set out: How the school manages drug-related incidents Support for pupils The provision of drug education
  26. 26. The school’s drug policy should include: Arrangements for ensuring that governors are well informed on drugs issues as they affect the school. The role of governors (or a designated governor if appointed) in policy development; overseeing the drug education programme; and contributing to any case conferences called, or appeals against exclusions.* *DfE (2012)Drug advice to schools
  27. 27. Reviewing the school drug policy It should be agreed in consultation with the whole school community including pupils, parents and staff. Consultation:  Helps people ‘buy in’ to the policy  Helps them understand the issues  Helps build a better functioning policy Mentor’s toolkit is a simple how-to guide www.mentoruk.org.uk/resources/schools
  28. 28. Key questionsto ask in your What are we doing to school promote health and wellbeing around drugs, alcohol and What impact tobacco? have thesemeasures had? What is the What needs to evidence for happen next...? that?
  29. 29. To find out more... www.mentoruk.org.uk/resources/schoolsGovernors can find: advice on best practice in drug education a toolkit to help in reviewing the school drug and alcohol policy more questions to ask in your school

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