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Michael O'Toole DfE presentation: Supporting schools to develop young people's resilience

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Mentor CEO Michael O'Toole DfE presentation 29 September 2016

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Michael O'Toole DfE presentation: Supporting schools to develop young people's resilience

  1. 1. The importance of supporting schools to develop young people’s character and resilience to risks Michael  O’Toole Chief  Executive,  Mentor
  2. 2. “Instilling positive character traits and academic excellence are two sides of the same coin – children that develop resilience are far more likely to succeed, not only in school but in later life, too.” -­ Edward  Timpson,  Children  &  Families  Minister
  3. 3. Life skills education “a holistic approach to the development of values, skills and knowledge in the learner, which assists young people to protect themselves and others in a range of risk situations.” - UNICEF, 2009
  4. 4. What does the evidence tell us?
  5. 5. Evidence tells us where need is Evidence tells us what works Evidence keeps us accountable Evidence helps us test, learn and improve
  6. 6. “I want schools across the country to seize the opportunity to help their pupils thrive.” -­ Edward  Timpson,  Children  &  Families  Minister
  7. 7. We must support schools so they can seize opportunities to help young people thrive
  8. 8. A community of practice: forms collaborative partnerships shares best practice and learning supports each other builds a strong evidence base
  9. 9. A connected ecosystem COMMUNITY YOUNG   PERSON FAMILY SCHOOL Carers Parents Teacher  &  staff   training Healthy   Schools Extracurricular   activities Leadership Resilience   education Life-­skills   education PSHE Faith-­based   organisations School policyHealthcare   services (incl.  mental   health) Emergency   services External   service   providers Research  and   resource  centres Local  Education   Authorities Media  and   advertising Youth  /   community   groups Child   protection   services Rehabilitation   services Prisons Charities Government National   policy Data   collection Legal  services Carers’  support   services International   policy NGOs Businesses Work   experience PRUs
  10. 10. Case study #1: Brighton & Hove
  11. 11. Identifying the need In  the  absence  of  statutory  PSHE,  local  schools  were   delivering  alcohol  and  drug  education  in  a  variety  of   ways  with  inconsistent  outcomes  for  pupils
  12. 12. What we did ü Develop  new  drug  and  alcohol  education  policy  for  schools ü Feed  back  outcomes  directly  to  PSHE  leads,  headteachers and  partners  through  local  conference  and  infographics   ü Train  pastoral  teams  on  young  people  and  substance  use,   including  'Train  the  Trainer'  sessions  for  local  staff ü Strengthen  links  between  schools  and  commissioned specialist  service ü Support  area-­wide  normative  campaigns  on  tobacco,  alcohol   and  cannabis
  13. 13. “Mentor understood the challenges faced by schools and local authorities and built relationships with colleagues in schools quickly that led to open and honest conversations.” -­ Sam  Beal,  Partnership  Adviser:  Health  &  Wellbeing Feedback
  14. 14. Case study #2: The Good Behaviour Game
  15. 15. What is the Good Behaviour Game? The  Good  Behaviour  Game  (GBG)  is  an  evidence-­ based  approach  to  classroom  management  that  helps   children  learn  how  to  work  together  to  create  a   positive  learning  environment.   Mentor  is  currently  running  a  two-­year  trial  of  the  GBG   funded  by  the  Education  Endowment  Foundation  (EEF).   This  ground-­breaking  research  will  measure  the  impact   of  the  GBG  intervention  in  UK  schools.
  16. 16. The evidence base More  than  40  years  of  international  research  has  shown  the  GBG  to   have  dramatic  benefits  on  children’s  behaviour,  as  well  as  significant   long  term  educational  and  health  benefits,  including: ü Immediate  improvements  in  pupil  behaviour,  particularly  for   disruptive  boys ü Improved  attainment  and  achievement ü Increased  numbers  of  students  continuing  into  further  education ü Reduced  substance  abuse,  mental  health  problems  and  criminal   behaviour  in  later  life
  17. 17. Feedback At  the  beginning  of  the  year  children   were  very  adult  dependent,  they   wouldn’t  speak  to  each  other  and  they   wouldn’t  offer  advice  to  others  either.  .  .   now  that  they  are  playing  the  game   they  will  clearly  see  someone  struggling   and  will  help  them. -­‐ Year  3  Teacher The  Good  Behaviour  Game  has   enhanced  children’s  behaviour  and   significantly  impacted  their  motivation   and  approach  to  learning.  Children  are   taking  greater  responsibility  for  the   completion  of  tasks,  they  are  working   together  and  increasingly  supporting   each  other. -­‐ Headteacher Find out more at gbguk.org
  18. 18. Strengthening schools COMMUNITY YOUNG   PERSON FAMILY SCHOOL Carers Parents Teacher  &  staff   training Healthy   Schools Extracurricular   activities Leadership Resilience   education Life-­skills   education PSHE Faith-­based   organisations School policyHealthcare   services (incl.  mental   health) Emergency   services External   service   providers Research  and   resource  centres Local  Education   Authorities Media  and   advertising Youth  /   community   groups Child   protection   services Rehabilitation   services Prisons Charities Government National   policy Data   collection Legal  services Carers’  support   services International   policy NGOs Businesses Work   experience PRUs Peers
  19. 19. Further Reading For  more  information  on: Ø Supporting  life  skills  education  in  schools Ø Evidence-­based  prevention Ø Building  a  community  of  evidence-­based  practice Ø Building  young  people’s  character  and  resilience Visit  mentor-­adepis.org
  20. 20. Contact Michael O’Toole: michael.otoole@mentoruk.org mentoruk.org.uk @Mentortweets

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