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National Women's History Month

This presentation provides an overview of the diversity in women's history; containing pictures and brief descriptions of women from various socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.

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National Women's History Month

  1. 1. National Women’s History Month Recognizing the plurality of voices in American women’s history. 1
  2. 2. 2
  3. 3. Phillis Wheatley Renowned poet -- 1773 (Library of Congress) 3
  4. 4. Harriet Tubman Former slave, and ‘Conductor of the Underground Railroad’ -- New York, 1911 (Library of Congress) 4
  5. 5. Sojourner Truth Preacher, abolitionist, and women's rights advocate (Library of Congress) 5
  6. 6. Ida B. Wells Journalist, civil rights advocate, suffragist –- 1891 (Library of Congress) 6
  7. 7. Members of the Women's League Advocates of women’s rights -- Newport, R.I. 1899 (Library of Congress) 7
  8. 8. Zora Neale Hurston Author, folklorist, and anthropologist (Library of Congress) 8
  9. 9. Day laborers picking cotton, near Clarksdale, Mississippi, 1939 (Library of Congress) 9
  10. 10. African American nurses, commissioned second lieutenants in the U.S. Army Nurses Corps, working-out during an advanced training course in Australia -- 2/1944 (U.S. National Archives) 10
  11. 11. Ella Fitzgerald Renowned Jazz musician during the Harlem Renaissance –- New York, September 1947 (Library of Congress) 11
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. Mary Wollstonecraft Early feminist; author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman -- 1792 (Library of Congress) 13
  14. 14. “Call to the First Women's Rights Convention as it appeared in the Seneca County Courier, July 14, 1848” (National Park Service) 14
  15. 15. Susan B. Anthony Well-known abolitionist; worked together with Elizabeth Cady Stanton to publish a woman's newspaper, Revolution, and form the National Woman Suffrage Association (Library of Congress) 15
  16. 16. Lucy Stone Antislavery and women's rights lecturer; coordinator for the first national American women's rights convention; co-editor of the Woman’s Journal, a women's suffrage newspaper (Library of Congress) 16
  17. 17. Carrie Chapman Catt Leading member of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) and key player in the success of the suffrage movement (Library of Congress) 17
  18. 18. Alice Paul Sewing another star on the suffragist flag, around 1919 (Library of Congress) 18
  19. 19. Women marching in a national suffrage demonstration -- Washington, D.C. 5/9/1914 (Library of Congress) 19
  20. 20. Prison cell (U. S. National Archives) 20
  21. 21. 1st women jury -- Los Angeles, November 1911 (Library of Congress) 21
  22. 22. 22
  23. 23. Mary Edwards Walker First female Army medical officer (Civil War); suffragist and dress reformer -- 1912 (Library of Congress) 23
  24. 24. Marie Curie (center) Chemist; two-time Noble Prize winner, co-discovered the radium element (Library of Congress) 24
  25. 25. Scientists making cultures of parasites -- 1910-1920? (Library of Congress) 25
  26. 26. Margaret D. Foster American chemist -- October 4, 1919 (Library of Congress) 26
  27. 27. Amelia Earhart First woman to pilot a plane across the Atlantic Ocean (Library of Congress) 27
  28. 28. Willa Beatrice Brown Trained pilots for the U.S. Army Air Forces, the first African American woman be commissioned as a lieutenant in the U.S. Civil Air Patrol during the WWII-era (U.S. National Archives) 28
  29. 29. Sally Ride America's first woman astronaut -- 06/18/1983 - 06/24/1983 (U.S. National Archives) 29
  30. 30. 30
  31. 31. Soledad Chavez Chacon 31 First female secretary of state for New Mexico, 1922 (National Women’s History Museum)
  32. 32. Dolores Del Rio 32 Early Mexican American actress (Library of Congress)
  33. 33. 33 Carrot pickers -- Edinburg, Texas, February 1939 (Library of Congress)
  34. 34. Chamisal, New Mexico -- July 1940 (Library of Congress) 34
  35. 35. “Sorting and packing tomatoes at the Yauco Cooperative Tomato Growers Association, Puerto Rico” -- January 1942 (Library of Congress) 35
  36. 36. 36 Dolores Huerta Labor activist (National Women’s History Museum)
  37. 37. 37 Sandra Cisneros Renowned author of the The House on Mango Street and Caramelo (Library of Congress)
  38. 38. Works Cited National women’s history museum. Retrieved from https://www.nwhm.org. Notable women’s rights leaders. National Park Service. Retrieved from http://www.nps.gov/wori/historyculture/notable-womens-rights- leaders.htm. Prints & photographs online catalog. Library of Congress. Retrieved from http://www.loc.gov/pictures/. Women of protest: photographs from the records of the National Woman's Party. Library of Congress. Retrieved from http://www.loc.gov/collection/women-of-protest/. Women’s History. U.S. National Archives. Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/collections/721576262 53040564/. Women striving forward, 1910s-40s. Library of Congress. Retrieved from https://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/sets/72157614805050 380/. 38

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This presentation provides an overview of the diversity in women's history; containing pictures and brief descriptions of women from various socio-economic and cultural backgrounds.

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