Parties and Elections in California Anagnoson et al., chapter 4
California’s weak political parties <ul><li>Reforms from the Progressive Era </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Presidential and partis...
Changes in CA Party Registration, 1978-2009
Party Registration by Age
Party Registration by Gender
Party Registration by Education
Party Registration by Race/Ethnicity
Party Registration by Nativity
Figure 4.3  Percent Difference between Democratic and Republican Registration by County (2008 Presidential Primary) Govern...
CA Population and Voter Registration, 1978-2009
CA Voter Turnout
Qualified Third Parties <ul><li>American Independent, Green, Libertarian & Peace and Freedom Parties </li></ul><ul><li>Rel...
Staying Qualified <ul><li>To stay qualified, a party must past both of the following tests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of i...
Can Third Party Candidates Win? <ul><li>In March 1999, Green Party member Audie Bock, 53, bested Democrat Elihu Harris in ...
Why Did Audie Bock Win? <ul><li>Feb. 1998: Ron Dellums retires from Congress </li></ul><ul><li>April 1998: State Senator B...
Party Affiliation <ul><li>Registration in the two major parties has declined in recent years. </li></ul><ul><li>Democrats ...
Party Registration by County <ul><li>Democratic areas (blue) tend to be coastal and urban. </li></ul><ul><li>Republican ar...
The Battle Over the Primary <ul><li>Until 1998, closed system </li></ul><ul><li>1996: Proposition 198, blanket primaries <...
Moving the Primary <ul><li>Until 2000, California held its primary elections in June. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Left Californi...
Proposition 93 <ul><li>Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.   </li></ul><ul><li>Re...
Next Local Election: 11/08/11 <ul><li>County Registrar   </li></ul><ul><li>Menlo College polling place: Fireside Lounge </...
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Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)

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Parties in the california state government (chapter 4)

  1. 1. Parties and Elections in California Anagnoson et al., chapter 4
  2. 2. California’s weak political parties <ul><li>Reforms from the Progressive Era </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Presidential and partisan primaries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nonpartisan elections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Office block ballots </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cross-filing (until 1959) </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Changes in CA Party Registration, 1978-2009
  4. 4. Party Registration by Age
  5. 5. Party Registration by Gender
  6. 6. Party Registration by Education
  7. 7. Party Registration by Race/Ethnicity
  8. 8. Party Registration by Nativity
  9. 9. Figure 4.3 Percent Difference between Democratic and Republican Registration by County (2008 Presidential Primary) Governing California in the Twenty-first Century , 3rd Edition Copyright © 2011 W.W. Norton & Company
  10. 10. CA Population and Voter Registration, 1978-2009
  11. 11. CA Voter Turnout
  12. 12. Qualified Third Parties <ul><li>American Independent, Green, Libertarian & Peace and Freedom Parties </li></ul><ul><li>Relatively easy for third parties to get on the ballot </li></ul><ul><ul><li>By registration (1% of voters in past general election) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By petition (10% of voters in past general election) </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Staying Qualified <ul><li>To stay qualified, a party must past both of the following tests: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One of its candidates for statewide office must receive at least 2% of the vote in any gubernatorial election. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The party must maintain at least 1/15 of 1% of the total registration. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The Peace and Freedom Party was removed from the ballot in 2000 for failing to meet these requirements, but re-qualified in 2003. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Can Third Party Candidates Win? <ul><li>In March 1999, Green Party member Audie Bock, 53, bested Democrat Elihu Harris in a special election to the Assembly, winning by just 327 votes out of 29,021 cast (turnout was 15%). </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bock was the first third-party candidate to be elected to the state's legislature since 1917. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bock lost (running as an Independent) in November 2000 to Democrat Wilma Chan. </li></ul>News clip
  15. 15. Why Did Audie Bock Win? <ul><li>Feb. 1998: Ron Dellums retires from Congress </li></ul><ul><li>April 1998: State Senator Barbara Lee elected to replace Dellums </li></ul><ul><li>Sept. 1998/Nov. 1998: State Assemblyman Don Perata elected to replace Lee </li></ul><ul><li>Feb. 1999: Elihu Harris (D): 49%, Frank Russo (D): 37%, Audie Bock (G): 8.7% </li></ul><ul><li>March 1999: “Chicken-dinner&quot; vouchers </li></ul>
  16. 16. Party Affiliation <ul><li>Registration in the two major parties has declined in recent years. </li></ul><ul><li>Democrats have lost the most registrants, while Decline to States have increased. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>44.6% Democrats </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>30.8% Republicans </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20.1% Decline to State </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(report) </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Party Registration by County <ul><li>Democratic areas (blue) tend to be coastal and urban. </li></ul><ul><li>Republican areas (red) tend to be inland and rural. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Although most counties are red, most Californians live in the blue counties </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. The Battle Over the Primary <ul><li>Until 1998, closed system </li></ul><ul><li>1996: Proposition 198, blanket primaries </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ruled unconstitutional, 2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>June 2010: Proposition 14, Top Two </li></ul>
  19. 19. Moving the Primary <ul><li>Until 2000, California held its primary elections in June. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Left California out of the presidential nominating game. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Switch to early March in 2000 and 2004 </li></ul><ul><li>Back to June for 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>February AND June for 2008 (Prop 93) </li></ul><ul><li>2012? </li></ul>
  20. 20. Proposition 93 <ul><li>Limits on Legislators’ Terms in Office. Initiative Constitutional Amendment. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces the total amount of time a person may serve in the state legislature from 14 years to 12 years. Allows a person to serve a total of 12 years either in the Assembly, the Senate, or a combination of both. Provides a transition period to allow current members to serve a total of 12 consecutive years in the house in which they are currently serving, regardless of any prior service in another house. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Next Local Election: 11/08/11 <ul><li>County Registrar </li></ul><ul><li>Menlo College polling place: Fireside Lounge </li></ul><ul><li>Nov. 5-7, Menlo College Get-Out-the-Vote effort (with Dr. McCabe) </li></ul>

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