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September 19 (83MW)

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September 19 (83MW)

  1. 1. September 19, 2011<br />Click to let me know you are here!<br />
  2. 2. Turn in Paragraph #2 with rough draft and peer review behind it!<br />
  3. 3. Go over Quiz #2<br />
  4. 4. Discuss Textbook<br />
  5. 5. Review of independent clauses<br />
  6. 6. Review of Independent Clauses<br />You can join two independent clauses with a FANBOYS!<br />
  7. 7. Independent Clauses<br />Pat enjoyed his first tennis lesson, but he was tired.<br />He learned to hit a forehand lob, and he learned to serve.<br />
  8. 8. Review of Independent Clauses<br />In the following sentences, underline the independent clauses.<br />Jill swam to the shore and Ben stayed on the boat.<br />Sam pet the dog.<br />Because he needed a quiet place, Frank went to the library.<br />After he typed his essay, Bill went to the store.<br />Someone should clean up the counter after he eats.<br />
  9. 9. Dependent or Subordinate Clauses<br />Although a dependent clause contains a subject and a verb, it cannot stand alone as a sentence.<br />To be part of a complete sentence, it needs to be attached to or part of an independent clause.<br />
  10. 10. Dependent Clauses<br />Dependent clauses are also called subordinate clauses because they often begin with one of these words, called subordinating conjunctions:<br />after if until <br />although since when<br />as that where<br />because though while<br />before unless <br />
  11. 11. Examples<br />Because my car broke down, I had to reschedule the dentist appointment.<br />Before my uncle retired, he was a welder.<br />I didn’t fly in a plane until I was seventeen years old.<br />
  12. 12. Dependent Clauses and Commas<br />As these examples show, you use a comma after a dependent clause that begins a sentence.<br />You generally do not use a comma before a dependent clause that ends a sentence.<br />
  13. 13. How to Identify a Dependent Clause<br />Check that the word group has a subject and a verb.<br />Check that it begins with a word such as because, until, before, after, although, when, or while.<br />Check that it cannot stand alone as a sentence.<br />
  14. 14. Activity 3: Identify Dependent Clauses<br />In each of the following sentences, underline the subordinate clause(s).<br />When the supervisor entered the office, Dean stopped playing his computer game.<br />On my street, the garbage is always collected before I wake up.<br />We toasted marshmallows and told ghost stories until the fire died.<br />If nobody has any questions, Ms. Skov will distribute the free samples.<br />Antonio wants to become a social worker because a social worker helped him through his long stay in the hospital.<br />
  15. 15. Activity 3: Identify Dependent Clauses<br />In each of the following sentences, underline the subordinate clause(s).<br />While the turkey roasted in the oven, the family played touch football.<br />Unless you pay your parking fines, you will not be allowed to register for classes when the next semester begins.<br />Since Kerry began jogging, she has been having pains in her knees.<br />After he graduates, Conrad wants to tour Mexico.<br />I have hidden your birthday present where you will never find it.<br />
  16. 16. Relative Clauses<br />A dependent clause may also begin with one of these words, called relative pronouns:<br /> that who<br /> what whoever<br />whatever whom<br /> which whomever<br />whichever whose<br />
  17. 17. Relative Clauses<br />A subordinate clause that begins with a relative pronoun is often called a relative clause.<br />Any soldier who passes the obstacle course will be allowed to leave.<br />Private Mejia, who passed the obstacle course, was allowed to leave.<br />Whoever cooked the food should be thanked.<br />
  18. 18. How to Identify a Relative Clause<br />Check that the word group has a subject and a verb.<br />Check that the word group begins with a relative pronoun such as that, who, what, which, whoever, or whichever.<br />Check that the word group cannot stand alone as a sentence.<br />
  19. 19. Activity 4: Identify Relative Clauses<br />In each of the following sentences, underline the relative clauses.<br />Janice is the only student who talked to the professor on the first day of class.<br />Ogbert is one of those people who work at night and sleep all day.<br />I worry about students whose extracurricular activities interfere with their studies.<br />Whoever ate Asher’s sandwich should fix him another one.<br />I recommend you buy the vehicle that has the least impact on the environment.<br />
  20. 20. Activity 4: Identify Relative Clauses<br />In each of the following sentences, underline the relative clauses.<br />Jolene is the only student whose research paper received an A.<br />Whoever comes home last needs to let the cat out.<br />Frankie is the only boyfriend who ever gave me a bouquet of roses.<br />Miss Sweden is the only contestant who played the accordion in the talent contest.<br />I feel sorry for the people whose jobs were eliminated last year.<br />
  21. 21. Process of Writing<br />Brainstorm<br />Narrow Your Topic<br />Thesis Statement<br />Topic Sentences<br />Introduction<br />Flesh Out<br />Conclusion<br />Revision and Editing<br />
  22. 22. Brainstorming<br />Ask questions<br />Listing<br />Free writing<br />Clustering<br />Researching<br />Talking to others<br />Drawing<br />
  23. 23. Narrow Your Topic<br />Education <br /> Higher Education<br /> Community Colleges<br /> Porterville College<br />Class size at PortervilleCollege<br />
  24. 24. Narrow Your Topic<br />Crime <br /> Increase in people going to prison<br /> Lack of rehabilitation<br /> Lack of schooling in prison<br /> We need to educate prisoners so they can be rehabilitated<br />
  25. 25. Narrow Topic As a Class<br />Technology<br />
  26. 26. Essay #1 Prompt<br />
  27. 27. Think back to past gatherings of your family, either around the table with your parent(s) or on a visit to a relative for a holiday. In every family there are stories told of past events: the time when your father was a boy and accidentally put a sling-shotted rock through the evil neighbor's window; or grandpa's story of walking ten miles through snow and ice to get to school; or the time when, as a young girl, you put your kittens in the washing machine to clean them!<br />
  28. 28. The type of story you want to focus on is one that is told often. It comes out of your own family's oral tradition.<br />
  29. 29. Here's how to get started on this essay:<br />First, jot down briefly a number of these type of stories you remember. For example, you might write “tuna fish story,” “grandma's ‘wee beastie’ story,” “dad's slingshot story.”<br />
  30. 30. Here's how to get started on this essay:<br />Next, choose one of these stories to work on for the moment. Freewrite on the story for about ten minutes, trying to retell the whole thing as you recall it.<br />
  31. 31. Here's how to get started on this essay:<br />Third, get a blank sheet of paper and list as many details, impressions, and phrases as you can recall. Also list details that you remember from the actually telling of the story such as where you have heard it before, when it's told, and who tells it. Some of these details of the story may need to be filled in by your imagination since you perhaps were not there when the story happened. Just get as much stuff down about the story as you can; don't worry about any sort of order.<br />
  32. 32. Here's how to get started on this essay:<br />Last of all, retell the story as fully and completely, and as entertainingly, as you can. Be as descriptive as you can, and include dialogue where needed. Imagine that your audience is your peers as well as your family and the original storyteller, and that your purpose is to get the original storyteller to nod their head and say, "yea, that's it, you told it just right." Try to practice showing and not telling.<br />
  33. 33. Note<br />If using a story from your family does not work for whatever reason, you can use a story from among your friends. The one criterion is it is a story that is "told often."<br />
  34. 34. Rough Draft<br />The rough draft is due Wednesday, September 28, 2011. We will be peer reviewing in class and you will have the opportunity to earn three extra credit points. Make sure you bring your highlighters on this day.<br />
  35. 35. Final Draft<br />The final draft is due Monday, October 3, 2011. Make sure you print papers early so you will have time to deal with any problems that should arise. Also, keep in mind that the final draft must be in my hands within the first ten minutes of class. If you are late, your paper is too.<br />
  36. 36. Points and Page Length<br />This essay should be about two pages (or five hundred to six hundred words) long and is worth 70 points. <br />
  37. 37. For homework<br />Follow the steps of brainstorming and narrowing your topic<br />
  38. 38. Brainstorm<br />First, jot down briefly a number of these type of stories you remember. For example, you might write “tuna fish story,” “grandma's ‘wee beastie’ story,” “dad's slingshot story.”<br />You must have at least five.<br />
  39. 39. Narrow Your Topic<br />Next, choose one of these stories to work on for the moment. Freewrite on the story for about ten minutes, trying to retell the whole thing as you recall it.<br />
  40. 40. Brainstorm<br />Third, get a blank sheet of paper and list as many details, impressions, and phrases as you can recall. Also list details that you remember from the actually telling of the story such as where you have heard it before, when it's told, and who tells it. Some of these details of the story may need to be filled in by your imagination since you perhaps were not there when the story happened. Just get as much stuff down about the story as you can; don't worry about any sort of order.<br />
  41. 41. Homework<br />Bring back your work for Essay #1<br />(Three brainstorms: One that is as many stories as you can think of (at least five), second, the free write of the story you narrow it down to, and third, your list of details)<br />Read and annotate “Making Room for Dad’s New Girlfriend” starting on page 358<br />

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